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ANNUAL REPORT 
1975 -1976 


THE FINE ARTS MUSEUMS 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 


3 1223 03473 5432 


A^IUAL EEPORT 1975-1976 


THE FINE ARTS MUSEU14S OF SAN FRANCISCO 
M« H, de Yoimg Memorial Museum 
California Palace of the Legion of Honor 

Ian McKibbin lAiite 
Director of the Museums 


7 49380 SFPL: EfONO TRi: 

61 SFPL 05/0^? 'OL 


IMDEX 


Par^e 

Director’s Foreword i 

Organizational Chart 
I. Collections Division 

Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas 1 

Department of Decorative Arts 4 

Department of Painting and Sculpture 11 

Department of Prints and Drawings l4 

(Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts) 

Department of Exhibitions 5 

Temporary Exiiibitions 7 

Painting Conservation Laboratory 12 

Registrar - de Young Museiim 17 

Registrar - California Palace of the Legion of Honor 20 
Library 22 

II* Education Division 23 

Program Office 25 

Art School 28 

Docent Council 33 

III. Administration Division 38 

Public Information Office 4l 

IV. The Museum Society 4-3 

APPETElICSS 

Appendix I - Achenbach Foundation 46 

Appendix II - Registrar - de Young Museum 53 

Appendix IH - Registrar - Legion of Honor 66 

Appendix IV - Program Office 73 

Appendix V - Docent Council 78 

Appendix VI - Art School 78 

Appendix VII - Administration Division 80 

Appendix VIII - Board of Trustees 85 

Appendix IX - Museum Society 86 



• -f,’ , .y.r.rf .;a<Uiiyen:Ht8i»Mi»/iim^i«OTUM4c»«Ui^Pi?ANCi«»nf8yyf^ 


I 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

1 

DIRECTOR 
Ian McKibbin White 


• EDUCATION 
'ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 
Thomas K. Seligman 


— PROGRAMS 
ASST. CURATOR 
Bruce Merley 
Charles Mills 


ORGANIST 


THEATER MANAGER 


— INTERPRETATION 
ASST. CURATOR 
Lizabeth Cohen i 
RESEARCH 

— ART SCHOOL 
CURATOR 
Elsa Cameron 
ASSOC. CURATOR 
Richard Fong 
STAFF AIDE 

John Chiu 2 

COMMUNITY WORKER 



COLLECTIONS 
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 


• PAINTING & SCULPTURE 
CURATOR 
William Eisner 
CONSERVATOR 
Ten Oikawa 


VISITING CURATOR 
Donelson Hoopes 

— GRAPHIC ARTS 
CURATOR 
Robert F. Johnson 
ASSOC. CURATOR 
Fenton Kasiner 
CURATORIAL ASST. 
Masine Rosston 3 
CONSERVATOR 


— DECORATIVE ARTS 
CURATOR 
D. Graeme Keith 
ASSOC. CURATOR 


CURATORIAL ASSOC. 
Anna Bennett 3 

CONSERVATOR 



— AFRICA. OCEANIA i THE AMERICAS 
ASST. CURATOR 

— PUBLICATIONS 
PUBLICATIONS MGR. 

Edward T. Engle i 


— LIBRARY 
LIBRARIAN 


— REGISTRATION 
REGISTRAR 
S. DeRenne Coerr 
Fred Snowden 
REGISTRATION ASST 
Harry Fugl 
PHOTOGRAPHER 


1 

EXHIBITIONS 
CURATOR 
Thomas H. Garver 
ASST. CURATOR 
Susan Lev, tin 



— INSTALLATION 
DESIGNER 
Royal Basich 
GRAPHIC DESIGNER 
Ron Rick 1 
EXHIBITION MGR. 


I— PREPARATORIAL 

ACTING CHIEF PREPARATOR 
John Almond 

PRINCIPAL PREPARATOR 
Ray Raczkowski 
PREPARATOR 
Rell Case 


Tad Foster 2 
David Hyry 2 



MUSEUM PACKER 
William Boyd 


ADMINISTRATION 
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 
Ronald Egherman 

I 


PAYROLL CLERK 


VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR 


SENIOR ACCOUNT CLERK 
losephine Regan 
ACCOUNT CLERK 
Lauro Cruz 
VENEXYR 
Francis Creedon 


STENOGRAPHIC SECRETARY 


CLERK STENOGRAPHER 


Sharon Hanford 2 

— ENGINEERING 

CHIEF STATIONARY ENGINEER 


STATIONARY ENGINEER 
Glenn Brakelield 
JoeCarvm 
Alphonso Morales 
Frank Ritchie 


OPERATIONS 

MUSEUM SERVICES COORDINATOR 
Salvatore Priolo 


I — SECURITY 

CHIEF GUARD 
Elvin Howard 


I 

JANITORIAL 
JANITOR SUB-FOREMAN 
Uveme Chatman 


SENIOR GUARD 
Myron Hahn 
Roger Moslev 


guard IANITRESS 

l37include58C.E.T.A I ,,, 

WATCHMAN 


FOOTNOTES 
1 - Museum Society funded 
2.C.E.T A. 

3 -Volunteer 


ii 




DIKUCTOR'S FOREV/ORD 


The year just ended was one of accomplishment, one bristling with 
import for the future, and one not v/ithout controversy. The event v/ith 
perhaps the most far-reaching effect was the imposition of a general 
admissions fee to the Iluseums for the first time ever which began to be 
collected in December. After meeting the cost of collecting the admissions, 
one-half of the additional revenue goes to support the Museiams' needs, the 
other half provides a new source of revenue for the City. Attendance to 
date is down by over a third and the effect on public relations v/as pre- 
dictable, The Museums have received letters of protest and questions of 
alternatives have been raised, but perhaps the best that can be said about 
the policy at this point, is that it is too early to adequately evaluate. 

Since admissions are directly affected by the Museums^ programs wliich 
fluctuate in popularity, it may take two to three years before we 
thoroughly understand the effects of the policy. 

Certainly the most exciting news of the year was that the Trustees had 
raised the money, million dollars to undertake the first major renovation 

to the de Young Museum building since the completion of the Brundage ^'^.ng 
ten years ago. Over half the year was spent on the architectural and 
engineering planning for the construction which began in March. An estimated 
completion date is projected from early to mid-1977* The elaborate 
preparations to clear the space for the renovation are described in the 
Assistant Directors’, Registrar’s, and the Art School Reports. Great thanlcs 
go to Tom Seligman, Fred Snov/den and their team of assistants who took on 
additional duties to accomplish this onerous task. The effect on the Art 
School was nothing less than traumatic. Classes at the Museum ceased 
temporarily and the School moved to a nev; location. The Downtown Center 
v/as the result, '^th a nev/ audience, new kinds of classes, an exhibition 
program, and in spite of increased operating costs, the possibility of a 
future after the School returns to the Museum. The renovation itself is 
fully described elsev/here, but tv/o very important points must be emphasized. 
Upon completion of the suite of conservation laboratories for paintings, 
fumit-ure, textiles (emphasizing tapestries) along vri.th the newly established 
regional conservation laboratory for v/orks of art on paper at the Legion of 
Honor, The Fine Arts Museums soon v/ill have one of the best museum conser'/’- 
ation facilities in the country. The Museums’ fine collection of American 
paintings, the Legion of Honor and de Young Museums collections wliich were 
combined after the merger of the Museums but inadequately housed, at last 
will have appropriate exhibition space in a new suite of American Galleries. 
These galleries are a Bicentennial gift to the Museum from the many donors 
who responded to the challenge of the Merrill Trust’s matching grant and 
funds provided by the bequest of William Noble. Conceptual planning for 
the galleries got under*way v/ith the impetus coming from the Education 
Division and the curatorial staff who decided we could do better than just 
hang the pictures on the wall. 


- 1 - 


'Hie major Bicentennial exliibition was the American paintings collection 
of and fh's. Jolm D. Rockefeller 3i*d. The exliibition was critized by a 
ft'w for not being a survey of American art, which it never intended to be, 

Init otherwise was enthusiastically received and accompanied by the most 
elaborate and innovative educational programs yet undertaken by the Museums, 
'ihe exliibition procirnm generally was marked by its diversity, including 
such chows created by the museum staff as the Lewis Land collection of 
Pre-Columbian sculpture (AOA Department), a Food Show and a Foot Show (Art 
School), two elegant exliibitions for local sculptors, Sam Richardson and 
Robert Cremean (Tom Carver) and the unexpected boon of Master Paintings 
from tlie Hermitage and the State Russian Museum. Attendance at the latter 
was severely curtailed when the Museums were closed by a citywide strike. 
Nonetheless, 95,295 people paid to enjoy such pictures as Caravaggio's 
"Lute Player", Rembrandt's "Sasld.a as Flora", tv/o early large scale Matisses, 
a pair of monumental Picassos and thirteen examples of the indigenous 
Russian School of painting. In January, a nev/ hanging of the Norton Simon 
French Collection was presented at the Legion of Honor with important new 
paintings added, a reinstallation v/hich celebrated the publication of 
Volume II of the collection catalogue. The paintings moved to Pasadena 
in June as expected, completing the agreed three year loan, certainly one 
of the most significant in the life of the museum. 

A flurry of exhibitions and activity was generated by Robert Johnson, 
the new Cijirator in Charge of the Prints and Drawings Department, the Achen- 
bach Foimdation for Graphic Art. It is a great relief and pleasure after 
a long search to have this important post so well filled. Conservator Roy 
Perlcinson returned to Boston in June after establishing the Paper Conservation 
Laboratory as a regional facility in two years as he had promised to do. 
Although anticipated, it was a loss. It was typical, however, of this 
competent and conscientious person that he left the laboratory in the hands 
of a well-trained and promising successor, Robert FuterrJ.ck, Lanier Graham's 
resignation at raid-year after six years as Chief Curator, was also a loss, 
if an inevitable one. During his tenure his primary accomplishments v;ere 
the reorganization of the collection by national school and the institution 
of a professional publications program, not only exliibition but collection 
catalogues. A number were v/ritten by Lanier himself, others by various 
staff members and a few by visiting guest curators. The pace was ambitious 
and eventually overwhelming for one person. In part, the solution to the 
problem has been to divide the burden of the job by creating a new position 
of Publications Manager funded by the Museum Society, In this capacity, 
the production of the publications is being handled capably by Ned Engle. 

During the last several months, great strides have been made in the area 
of personnel and administration and the credit goes to Ron Egherman v/ho 
has brought to the job a measure of creative thinking which has been missing 
for many years from this area of museum operations. One of the accomplish- 
ments of the year was recognizing the considerable potential of volunteer 
assistance available to the Museums, organising it and utilizing it in a 
broad spectrum of tasks. A by-product of the effort was the organising and 
writing of the Volunteer Handbook of policies, regulations and practices 
for the operation of the Museimis. Chuck Mills was largely resporjsible for 
compiling this information which also formed the basis of Joanne Backman's 
work on a similar employees handbook which we expect to publish next year. 


- ii - 


Important also was the isstiing of a written Acquisition Policy for works of 
art developed by the Acquisition Committee on the recommendation of staff 
and approved by the Board of Trmistees, At the request of the Museum Society, 
a study was imdertaken jointly by the Art Department of Stanford University 
and the Stanford Law School resulting in a Curatorial Code of Ethics. The 
study deals not only with the specific question of fees and royalties to be 
paid to curators for their publications but with the broader subject of the 
ethics of curatorial behavior, Althougli the Museums have not adopted any 
of the recommendations of the study as yet, the work was brought to the 
attention of the museum profession by the Association of Art Museum Directors 
at its annual meeting in June. 

A very profound issue came under discussion concerning the role of the 
Docent Council in the reorganization of the Education Division, namely the 
autonomy of a volunteer organization. The problem was not resolved at the 
end of the reporting period but the indication was clear that the Board of 
Trustees sets the policies for the Museums and the volimteer organizations 
such as the well established Docent Council or the newly established Bay Area 
Graphic Arts Council would have to adjust their bylaws to be in step with 
the policies of the Board of Trustees. 

A great deal of progress was made in getting out the story of the Museums, 
most noticeably in establishing a degree of rapport vn.th City Hall which the 
M-useums have never enjoyed before. The very tangible positive result was a 
modest increase in the annual operating budget which included several much 
needed new positions. In the Spring the Museums agreed to the demands of 
the Art Workers Coalition to participate in an unprecedented meeting in which 
the Museums would discuss their policies in an open forum. In preparation 
for the meeting planned for early July, the staff compiled a descriptive and 
statistical profile of the institution. In this continuing process of self- 
evaluation and repoi*tage, greater and expanded use of this Anniial Report is 
contemplated. Principal credit for the more readable format goes to its 
editor, Ned Engle. Its production has been well executed as usual by 
Earl Anderson. I hope the report is a fair indication of i\7hat continues 
in my opinion to be a very dynamic department. 


Ian McICibbin V/hite 
Director of Museums 


- iii - 





DEPARKffiNT OF ^^JTRICA, OCEAiaA AM) THE AlfflRICAS 


This year, the major efforts of the department have been directed tov/ards 
the creative utilization, development, maintenance, and interpretation of 
our collections. To this end, we have presented five exhibitions, completed 
two major permanent gallery reinstallations, added over 400 objects to our 
permanent collection, and endeavored to explore a number of new interpretive 
approaches and educational programs. 

Exhibitions 


The year began in July va.th the opening of 'Fire, Earth and V/ater: 

Sculpture from the Land Collection of Mesoamerican Art a major exhibition 
at the ualifornia Palace of the Legion of Honor whicbTincluded over l4o 
objects, a fully illustrated l4o-page catalogue with scholarly essays, an 
audio-visual presentation explaining the cultural context from which the 
objects came, extensive labels which challenged people to draw their own 
conclusions about the objects before them (after receiving clues as to ivhat 
they might mean) , and an atmospheric installation evoking Maya architect-ure 
and environment. Docent tours were given six days a \7eek and several 
musical programs v/ere planned around the exhibition, Tlie catalogues sold 
out and the exhibition proved so successful that it wels extended until 
December. It was circulated to the Honolulu Academy of Arts, and then to 
the Seattle Art Museum, 

In October, an exhibition celebrating the Mexican Day of the Dead was on 
view in our Introductory Gallery; it included a simulated Oaxacan altar, 
a number of religious objects and offerings, examples of special candies 
and breads, and a variety of children*s. toys and games (75 objects total). 
Labels relating the customs, history and significance of the celebration 
were written by Yolanda V/oo, owner of the collection. A poster was designed 
to publicize the exhibition. 

A cross-cultural exhibition of jewelry followed in the Introductory Gallery 
space’ in February, which included over 8o objects primarily dra\ni from the 
Museum’s ovm collections. The labels in this exhibition took a rather novel 
interpretive view, encouraging people to think about some of their o’^m 
motivations for wearing jewelry, the variety of materials from which jewelry 
can be made, where it can be i/orn, and the feelings that a particular piece 
of jewelry might inspire, 

A new exhibition space was created by covering a wall in Gallery H with 
dark brown burlap to permit changing exhibitions of tv/o-dimensional objects 
which relate to our permanent collection, T-wo photographic exhibitions by 
Bay Area artists took place this year, 'Photographs of V/est Africa by 
Lucas Kiers included 21 superb black and v/hite photographs of v.'est "African 
people showing cultural continuity and change. The Otavalo ' by Benna 
Kolinsky was a different kind of exhibition - a photo essay documenting 
the traditional life processes of an Ecuador Indian group ;d.th which she 
lived. The 51 photographs were grouped according to themes, and exter^sive 
labels were provided which documented traditional ciILture and change: a 
personal view as seen by Benna Kolinsky in 197^, 


- 1 - 


AFRICA « OCTANIA APID THE ATiEniCAS (continued ) 


Two major reinstallations took place in oiir permanent gallery this year, 
and v/e are gradually replacing loan objects with new acquisitions. In 
July, five cases were changed in the Precolumbian section, and 37 new 
objects were added. In August, sijc more cases v/ere reworked (Southwest, 
Eastern Guinea Coast, Yoruba, Guinea Coast - Ivory Coast, Peru, and 
Polynesia) and over 20 new objects were installed. Both times the label 
panels were largely rewritten to accommodate new changes, and in the process 
a new system for label production was developed in conjunction with our 
Graphic Design Department. 

This year we also utilized the seating area of the permanent gallery to 
display textiles from each of the four major culture areas ive represent, 
and we have also maintained our Recent Acquisitions case. 

Collections 


This year we have been very conscious both of seeldng new objects to fill 
gaps in the collection and of utilizing our existing collection in the most 
beneficial way possible. V/e have received over 100 donations this year, 
plus a collection of over 370 goldv;eights from A.frica« V/e have made several 
exchanges with galleries and museums to trade deaccessioned objects (for 
which v;e have duplicates) for items that v;e do not have. Exchanges have 
talcen place vn.th the Lowie liuseum of Anthropology, The James V/illis Gallery 
and Galleiy Anushlca in Amsterdam. 

V/ith the extensive help of the Registration Department we have inventoried 
and catalogued over 16 gO Precolumbian objects of minimal aesthetic or 
archaeological value, and loaned them on a long-term basis to the San 
Francisco Unified School District where they will be used in classroom 
study kits. V/e have also given objects to oin* School Program for use by 
cur docents. 

Collection maintenance, research and documentation continued. For example, 
a new system for storing small items such as goldweights v;as devised and 
implemented. Since we have received so many donations, we have made a con- 
certed effort to update our photographic and slide records. 

Prof?rams, Planning, and On-going Research 

In conjunction vn.th the Environmental Science Center of the San Francisco 
Unified School District and our Docent Coordinator, a program was planned 
wherein 8 gifted 9th grade students v/ere trained to give tours to elementary 
school children. During the months of February and March, these tours 
reached over 27 classes. The focus of these tours v/as animals and environ- 
ment, with an "African Safari" theme. Evaluations of the program by par- 
ticipants and teachers were positive. 


- 2 - 


AFRICA, OCSANIA AKD THE AMSKCCAS (Continued ) 


A film supported hj National Endowment for the Humanities on a Pomo basket- 
maker, Alice Elliott, was finally completed this year, and v;on a national 
film award. Fne film is being used by our school docents and we hope even- 
tually to make it available to school districts. 

We continue to receive enthusiastic responses and requests for the Intro- 
ductory Gallery audio-visual program. This year v/e compiled an information 
sheet which is sent out to interested people, on the music used in the shew, 
V/e have also compiled a guide to Bay Area galleries concerned with ethnic 
art that v/e send out upon inquiry. 

Research and planning was initiated for an exhibition of Huichol Indian art 
to complement the Musemn's collection. Material was previewed in the Smith- 
sonian film archives, as were Huichol collections in New York, New Mexico 
and California. Several funding sources were approached and a number of 
scholars were contacted. 

Staffing 


One major difficulty this department has faced since its inception has been 
staffing. The Museum Society alleviated the problem on a temporary basis 
by providing funds for a full-time Assistant Curator. This position v/as 
needed for the continued maintenance of the department. Projects which 
otherwise v/ould not be accomplished are planned for the coming year. 


Thomas K, Seligman 
Curator in Charge 
Department of Africa, Oceania 
and The Americas 

Kathleen Benin 
Assistant Curator 
Department of Africa, Oceania 
and The Americas 


- 3 - 


DEP.-\RT!'lEin' OF DECORATIVE ARTS 


Tho year was inarked by a number of importairb additions to the peimanent 
collection: 

RQSCOE ADD MARGARET OAICES FQTTNDATION ; 

Triptych (’’Entry into Jerusalem, Last Supper, Washing of the Feet”)* 

Tapestry . Flemish, ca* 1^0; and the exchange of 7 tapestries. 

Covered Porringer & Stan d. Silver* English (London), 1662* leaker R,F* 

CHARLES E. MERRILL TRUST, through the I^gowan Decorative Aits Fund; 

Fair of Mirrors & Console Tables* Wood, carved and gilded* English (London), 
ca. 1765* Carved “by John Linnell. (Article on and pictures of these gifts 
were published by Helena Hayward in the January 1976 issue of Connoisseur 
magazine* Adding to their interest and importance is the fact that Linnell *s 
origiml drawing for these mirrors and console tables has survived and is new 
in the Victoria & Albert I^useum, London* 

Sofa, Mahogany * American (New York), ca* I 83 O 

Settee, Mahogany * English (London), ca* 1780* 

GIFT OF imS* J. A* CON^TERSE IN MEI^IORY CF HER HUSBAND; 

Card Table * Roset-rood with brass inlay* American (New York), ca* I 835 * 

GIFT OF IffiS, JOHN E. AND ROSS MAGNIN (transferred to the Museum upon the 
death of Rose lignin. This large gift included many important paintings 
and objects of decorative arts, including French Medieval and Renaissance 
enamels, furniture. Oriental porcelains and Italian majolica as well as a 
number of sculptures. 

The architectural enrichment of Galleiy 17 at the de Young Museum (financed 
by the Museum Society Auxiliaiy) was completed and the galleiy installed as 
a divided period setting devoted to Queen Anne and Hepplewhite furniture and 
English paintings of the period* The two hall cases flanking the entrance 
to Galleiy 17 were re-installed with English earthenware, stoneware and 
porcelain, making this area a totally English experience* 

During the year under review? the Textile Conservation Laboratoiy has washed 
seven tapestries arjd completed work on five in preparation for the November 
(1976) Thpestiy Exhibition at the Legion of Honor, After completing a year 
of study abroad, Bruce Hutchison was appointed Supervisor of the Tapestiy 
woikshop replacing Renee Fkrsh who had been Acting Supervisor during his 
absence* Ffrs* Anna Bennett has completed work on the catalogue of our 
important tapestiy collections 5 the material for this ambitious publication 
is now in the hands of the piintera* Ralph Bennett wrote and illustrated 
with dravTings a brochure entitled ’’Tapestiy Conservation Equipment in The 
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco”, 'Bie 20-page brochure was sent to 35 
museums throughout the count ly which have textile conservation departments* 

D* Graeme Keith, Curator in charge 
Decorative Arts 


- 1 ; . 


DEPAETOENT OF EXI-IIBITIOUS 


The Department of Exliibitions is responsible for all aspects of the physical 
installation of works of art, both temporary exliibitions cvnd permanent gallery 
installations, in the Museums. In addition, the Department worlcs vn.th the 
Education Department to coordinate the production and use of interpretative 
material prepared for e:d'.ibition use. The Department also works with other 
departments in the preparation of catalogue materials and maintains the master 
exhibition schedule for several years in advance. The Department may also be 
responsible for the direct organization of temporary exhibitions. The Depart- 
ment is involved vn.th the supervision of lighting and arcliitectiaral changes 
for temporary and permanent exhibition spaces in both buildings. 

During the Fiscal Year 1975-1976 the Department of Exhibitions was involved 
with the planning, coordinating and mounting of 33 temporary exhibitions, in 
addition to re-installations of some of the museums’ peivnanent galleries. 

Two of the exhibitions. Master Paintings from the Hermitage and State Russian 
Museum, Leningrad , and American Art: An Exhibition from the Collection of 
Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd required the greatest amount of space, 
time, and staff energy in organizing and planning. It v/as anticipated that 
the collection from the Hermitage and State Russian Museum would attract the 
largest crov/ds, but the unexpected City craft v/orkers strike forced the museum 
to close for a time and curtailed public transportation. 

The most noticeable change in our permanent galleries v/as the opening of the 
English Rooms at the de Young. Although the Classical Gallery (Gallery One) 
v/as scheduled to open this year, the strain of our active exhibition schedule 
forced the delay of this project which now will open in September 1976. 

Some improvements were made to the deteriorating physical plants, v/ith a new 
lighting system iristalled in Gallery 13 at The California Palace of the Legion 
of Honor. The floors in the de Young’s temporary exhibition v/ing were stripped, 
sanded, and stained, and all of the ceilings v/ere painted. The addition of 
ten modules to our stock of exliibition furniture became necessary, as the 
size and scope of the exhibitions increased. The completely revised system 
of internal musevim graphics is undervi/ay, with a scheduled debut in August 
1976. The museums galleries ;d.ll be more clearly identified and keyed to a 
map available in each museum. 

The small but vigorous exhibition program of contemporary Bay Area art 
continued as we instituted a series of programs called "Meet the Artist” 
in which an artist appeared in the galleries to speak informally vnth museum 
visitors and ansv/er questions about his or her art. 

An information packet about The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco v/as 
researched and prepared by Susan Levitin (Assistant Curator of Sxhibitiorjs) 
and Susan Melim (Administrative Assistant) for a meeting with the Artv/orkers 
Coalition, It v/as the first time a definitive "balance sheet” for the museums 
had been made public dealing v/ith their governance, funding, staffing and 
programs. 


- 3 - 


DSPAl^-lTnuIT OF ILvHIBITIONS (Continued) 


T)ie Depai'tmoiit is pleased to armoiuice the creation of a new City-f-unded 
position for the Assistant Curator of Exliibitions , thus relieving the Museum 
Society of the financial burden. The funding for this position, held by 
Suscui Levitin, \^dll begin July 1, 1976. Michael Cox xvas appointed to the 
new part-time position of Exliibition Manager, created by the Museiim Society, 
Beginning August 1st he will serve as liaison person and coordinator for 
all museum installations. 

Adequate staffing remains our most critical problem. Our small crew of five 
Preparators, assisted on a temporary basis by a C.E.T.A, employee, is res- 
ponsible for installing exhibitions in over 100,000 square feet of gallery 
space. As the exhibition program escalates in quantity and content, the 
sise of our prepara torial crew has become so glaringly inadequate that it 
has been necessary to hire additional crew members on a temporary basis 
from exhibition to exhibition. The need for ne\j preparator positions must 
be acknowledged as one of the most crucial problems to resolve in the coming 
year, 

A listing of the temporary exhibitions mounted in The Fine Arts Museums of 
San Francisco follows. 


Thomas H, Garver 
Curator of Sdiibitions 


- 6 - 


TEMPORAHT EXHIEETIOJK 197^-1976 
California Palace of the Legion of Honor: 


FIRE, EARTH & WATER: SCULPTURE FROM THE LAND COLLECTION OF MESOAIIEIRICAN ART 
July k - September lii 

Approximately 1^0 Pre-Columbian works of art from Mexico and Central America, 
selected from the collection of Louis K* Land. 

JOSE LUIS CUE7AS August l6 - October 12 

Recent drawings by a Mexican artist xjho works in the Spanish tradition. 

AFGA - RECENT ACQUISITIONS Au^t l6 - September 28 

An exhibition of recent acquisitions of the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic 
Arts including more than forty prints and drawings from the l6th Centuiy 
through the 20th Centuiy. 

CALLIGRAPHY September 20 - October 26 

An exhibition of historic and contemporaiy calligraphy, drawn primarily from 
the Special Collecrbions Department of the San Francisco Public Library. 

ELEANOR DICKINSON LINS DRAl/IENGS October 8 - December li; 

Line draxdngs of nudes by the winner of a one-person show at the 197h San 
Francisco Art Festival. Ihe artist taught drawing classes in the galleiy, 
using live models. 

WOlffiN ARTISTS: REVIEW AND RECOGNITION October 11 - December 28 
A selection of prints, paintings, drawings and sculpture by women artists, 
from the permanent collections, spanning the l6th to the 20th centuries. 

ARTISTS » PORTRAITS AND SEIF PORTRAITS FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION 
December 20 - Februaiy 22 

Prints by Rembrandt, Jacques Villon, Augustus John and Leonard Baskin, 
selected from a private San Francisco collection. 

ARTISTS » PORTRAITS AND SELF PORTRAITS FROM THE ACHENBACH FOUNDATION FOR 
GRAPHIC ARTS December 20 - April 2^ 

Prints ty Goltzius, Rembrandt, Kaethe KoHwitz, Grant Wood, Max Klinger, 

Jim Dine, Robert Bechtle and others. 

PRIinS BY EDGAR CHAHINE January 10 - Februaiy 29 

90 etchings dating from 189^ to World War n shoxving genre scenes of Paris 
at the turn of the centuiy. The etchings are from the collection of Albert 
Nalbandian of San Francisco, 

THREE CENTURIES OF FRENCH ART January 22 - June 27 

One hundred paintings and sculptures of the 17th, l8th and 19th centuries, 
loaned by the Norton Simon Foundation and Norton Simon Inc. Foundation, 
reinstalled to coincide with the publication of Volume H of the catalogue. 

TSUTSUMU: THE ART OF THE JAPANESE PACICAGE tferch 13 - May 9 
Approximately 200 examples of the art of distinctive packaging in Japan that 
has developed over thousands of years. 


- 7 - 


T.2 TCP^XKY TICMG 

Cnlifornia Palace of the Legion of Honor (Continued) 

MASTEH PAINTINGS FROM T^IF. HLRI-HTAGS AND STATE RUSSIA!'! MUSEU14, LENINGRAD 
March 2? - May 9 

A selection of 43 masterpieces of l/estern European and Russian paintings from 
tl^e collections of the Hermitage and State Russian Museum. Included in the 
e:diibition are v;orks by Caravaggio, Rembrandt, Rubens, Van Dyck, Gauguin, 
i'latisse, Picasso, Bakst, and Repin. 

•rjRN OF TI!E CENTURY AIIERICAN POSTERS: THE ARTHUR U. BAPLIEY COLLECTION 
May 22 - July l8 

An exliibition of over 70 posters illustrating America at the turn of the century, 
DRA\/INGS BY GOPUON 3ALDV/IN May 22 - June 2? 

Pen and ink drav/ings by a Bay Area artist rendering his personal fantasies in 
detailed, precise, representational images, 

WOOD SCULPTURE BY RAY SELLS June 19 - August 15 

Sculpture emphasising the inherent texture of laminated xvood by a winner at 
the San Francisco Art Festival, 

DALE ERICICSON June 19 - August 15 

Representational drawings and prints of capped objects and forms by a Bay 
Area artist who is the recipient of a one-person show award at the San 
Francisco Art Festival. 

M, H. de Young Memorial Museum: 

JOSE BERNAL RAI'IOS July 4 - August 17 

Photographic essay of life in the Salinas Valley by a winner of a San Fran- 
cisco Art Festival av;ard for a one-person shov/, 

IMAGES FOR ETEPIIITY: THE ART OF AI!GIENT EGYPT July 26 - October l8 
120 works, "on loan from the Lov/ie Museum of Anthropology and The Brooklyn 
Museum; sculptxire and decorative arts from the entire 3000 year span of 
Egyptian art. 

LEIRNY SILVERBERG August 23 - October 26 

V/atercolors by a Bay /area artist who combines drav^dng and color washes, 
producing paintings that suggest representations of living tissue. Silverberg 
appeared in the gallery as part of the continuing program, "Meet the A-rtist". 

COILLE HOOVEN August 23 - October 26 

Vdiite porcelain bowls, cups, teapots and other objects decorated with fantastic 
animals, by a Bay Area sculptor. The artist appeared in the gallery as part 
of the continuing program, "Meet the Artist", 


lEMPORARI EXHEBITIOr© 


M. H* de Young Memorial Ifeeum: (Continued) 


CHRISTO’S RUmUHG FENCE: A PROJECT IN PROCESS August 30 - October 12 
An ffichibition of drawings, collages, documents and photographs with accompany- 
ing text to record Christo ’s proposal to construct a 2I4. mile fence across 
part of Sonoma and I-krin Counties from east of Highway 101 to the Pacific 
Ocean. Christo participated in the "Meet the Artist" program, 

DAY OF THE DEAD October 28 - January 30 

A reconstruction of a Oaxacan altar for DIAS DE LOS MUERTOS, surroimded by 
associated religious objects, toys, food and offerings typical of this im- 
portant observance in Mexico, 

INTRODUCTION TO PAINTING COl'SSRVATION November - April 15 

Special informative material including photographs, text, and pigment analysis 
of the recently completed treatment by the Museums ’ painting conservation 
department of LUCRETIA by Joos van Cleve. 

CLAYTON BAILEY: WONDERS OF THE WORLD ICTSEUM November ^ - January 11 
A Bay Area Funk artist ’s satire upon tum-of-the-century archaeological 
and natural history museians, dajrbon Bailey appeared in the gallery as 
part of the "Meet the Artist" program, 

SM RICHARDSON: LIGHTLINE November l5 - January I4. 

A work created in the museum by a Bay Area sculptor. The public was invited 
to observe the construction in progress, 

THE FOOD SHOW November 22 - January 25 

A collection of foods (augmented by photographs) intended to shoc-r the multi- 
cultural composition of San Francisco, 

ART AND THE I^TTEN WORD: AN EIHIBITION OF DOCUMENTS FROM THE ARCKTTES OF 
Al-IERIGAN ART December 6 - February 15 

Historical documents of national significance, including correspondence of 
well-known artists, 

ROBERT CRETffiAN SCULPTURE January 17 - iiarch lit 

Two autobiographical pieces by a Bay Area artist, HOMAGE TO PAUL APOSTLE in 
marble, and VATICAN CORRIDOR in wood, 

ORANGE CRATE LABELS February 7 - March 28 

Approximately UOO labels, augmented by photographs, from the late 19th century 
to World War II, most designed and printed in the Bay Area, 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF WEST AFRICA BY LUCAS KLEES February 12 - May 12 

100 black and white photographs that portray daily life of many West African 

tribal people, by a Bay Area photographer. 


r:y^>o?^A^^Y zxiiidi ticms 

M, 11. de Youn^ Meinorial Museiim (Continued) 


AlCn^ICAIJ ART: AI'I EXHIBITION FROM THE COLLECTION OF MR. AND MRS. 

1.1 OHN D. ROClvEFELLER April 17 - August 15 

106 worlcG, including painting, d^a\^^.ng, watercolors and sculptures, selected 
from the collection assembled by Mr. and Mrs, John D, Rockefeller 3rd. The 
exliibition includes major works by American artists such as Copley, Feke, 
Sinibert, Johnson, Peale, Eakins, Homer, and Wyeth, 

MURAL PROJECT May - August 

A fantasy of the future in mural form measuring sixty feet long and sixteen 
feet liigh, against the northeast v/all of the de Young Museum, by artists 
Johji Wherle and John Rampley, The mural shows a section of the James Lick 
Freev/ay complete v/ith cars and the skyline of the City, but the scene is 
completely devoid of humanity and is populated only by \dLld animals now on 
the endangered species list. 

PHOTOGRAPHS BY BENNA KOLINSKY June through September 26 

An e:diibition documenting the traditional life of a small group of Indians 
in Highland Ecuador, 


- 10 - 


DEP*y^TI”lENT 0? PAINTING SCULPTIIRS 


Durinc 'the year 1975-1976 Vol. II of the catalogtie of the Norton Simon loan 
was' completed. Tliis publication, becun in 1975 1 catalogues and illustrates 
52 paintings in addition to the worlcs included in Vol, I, It became avail- 
able at the opening of the third and last installation of the Simon collection 
which opened January 22, 1976, As of the closing of the period of this report, 
preparations have been made for the return of the collection after the exhibit- 
ion closed on June 27, 1976. 

Simultaneously, planning was under way for the re-installation of the Simon 
galleries with 19th century material from our French collections. Included 
in the installation will be decorative arts and sculpture as well as paint- 
ings. 

A survey was made of all paintings in the Museums' collections to classify 
them as being of exhibition quality, for study collections or recommended 
for ’’de-accessioning”. 

In cooperation xd.th the registration dep£irtment, numerous loan requests for 
art works \/ere processed. This involved the recommendation to the Board of 
Trustees as to the granting of a loan, the arrangements for condition reports 
from the conservation department and the determination of values for insurance 
purposes. 

Effective January 31* 1976, F. Lanier Graham, Chief Curator and Curator-in- 
Charge of the Painting Department, resigned. V/illiam H, Eisner, Ciirator in 
the department, was named Acting-Curator in charge. Mr, Graham, who had held 
his position in the department since May 1970, re-organized the housing of the 
collections on the basis of "school". Thus all v;orks of French origin are nov; 
housed at the California Palace of the Legion of Honor v/hile all other schools 
are housed at the M, H, de Young Memorial Museum. 


William H, Eisner, Curator 
Department of Painting and 
Sculpture 


- 11 - 


PAIIITIIIG COMSEPVATION L;U30r?iiT0RY 


One of the major accomplishments of the laboratory was the special exhibition 
about painting conservation at the de Young Tiasterpiece Gallery from 
November 1975 to April 1976. Based on the recently completed restoration 
by this department of Lucretia by Joos van Cleve, it presented didactic 
material and photographs of the different aspects of painting conservation 
to acquaint the public v;ith the principles and practice of museum painting 
conservation. Tliis is the first time in the Museums’ histo 2 ry that such 
material was made available to the public; the response of the public and 
the press was very favorable, and it has been requested for loan by another 
museum. 

The planning for the new lab and the purchasing of additional equipment 
(from National Endowment for the Arts funds) v/ere given priority in 
anticipation of the move next year, Ne\7 equipment has been put to good 
use in the complete technical and analytical examination of paintings, 
including those being considered for major treatment and acquisition, and 
the recently acquired paintings from the Rose Magnin bequest. Detailed 
examination consists of visual, microscopic and analytical examination and 
documentation, including the use of ultraviolet, infrared and x-rays. 

For each loan exhibition during the year (Rockefeller, Russian, Norton 
Simon collection) , paintings had to be thoroughly ir^pected for condition 
upon arrival .■& 'departure, with frequent inspections during their stay here. 
Tliis department is responsible for any treatment they may require. In order 
to minimize the time v;hich ordinarily has to be spent on paintings on loan 
that arrive at the Museums in poor or damaged condition, a different procedure 
v/as established foi the Rockefeller loan of American paintings. As they had 
not been under a conservator’s care, I went to Nev/ York to inspect and record 
their condition, and do whatever work was necessary to prepare them for 
traveling, Tliis no doubt resulted in a considerable saving of time and 
liability, and prevented potential harm to them in shipment. 

In preparation for the opening of the American V/ing next year, major con- 
servation v/ork was centered on our permianent American paintings, V/ork on 
the Magnin paintings v;as started, but since each of them is in need of 
major treatment, only technical examinations, emergency work and some cleaning 
has been possible to date. Lesser treatment, though time-consuming as well, 
v;as given to many paintings; these were mainly damages which occurred in the 
museums. In August, I carried out a survey to measure light intensity and 
other factors in both museums with all heating and most artificial lights 
turned off. 

Since improper framing can cause considerable damage to paintings, a project 
was initiated two years ago to inspect and correct this in the galleries. 

Due to lack of time, this could only be done intermittently vm.th the help 
of volunteers; unfortunately so much time was spent training and supervising 
them that the program had to be discontinued. 


- 12 - 


PAINTING CONSERVATION (Continued) 


As a public service to other institutions, I supervised in a pigment 
analysis project an intern from the Nev; York University School of Conservation. 
I was also guest lecturer on conse3rvation the past two years at seminars 
sponsored by the University of California-Lowie Musevim. 

Upgrading the department to today* s professional stcindards and the application 
of modern scientific methods in the conservation of paintings has meant that 
the department’s worl-cload has trebled since 1970. Tne department is oven-zorked 
and there is increasingly less time available for the work on paintings in the 
Huseuras’ permanent collections, I have estimated that the amount of- v/ork 
necesscury to properly conserve them (aside from the normal household care) 
would require a staff of five conservators (three painting conservators and 
two technical assistants) for five years. (The Magnin paintings alone would 
take a conservator several years to complete). It is imperative that 
additional help be given this department. 


Teri Oilcawa-Pi canto 
Painting Conservator 


- 13 - 


ACH3JEAC!I FOUTIDATIOri FOR GR^'J^IIIC Ai^TS 


In 19^0 Ml*, and Mrs, Moore S, Achenbach created the Achenbach Foundation for 
drapliic Arts (AFGA), and presented their entire collection of prints to the 
City and County of Gan Francisco, with the provision that it would be housed 
in the Legion of Honor. Tlie Foundation is, in effect, the Museums* department 
of prints and drawings, \\rLth the largest graphics collection in the western 
United States. It houses not only a systematic representation of the history 
of printmaJclng from the 15th century to the present (vd.th approximately 100,000 
prints) but also nearly 2,000 drav;ings, a collection of illustrated books, and 
an e>xollent reference library of more than 3j000 volumes. 

Ihe graphics collection has been substantially increased through an ehdov.mient 
bequest of the Achenbachs and by generous benefactions of other donors. AFGA. 


undertook an active program in 1975-76, 
acquisitions. 

1. EXHIBITIONS 

Ruth Lilienthal Memorial Exhibition 

kprll 19- July 8, 1975: 


P-o din Gra-phics 

June 10- August 10, 1975 i 


F.c din’s Contemporaries 
June 25- August 10, 1975: 


Ac quisitions - 197^ - 1973 
Au{^st l6-September 28, 1975 : 


including exhibitions and further 


93 Items of Painting, Sculpture, 

Dravrijigs and Prints; the 1975 Bequest 
of Ruth Haas Lilienthal to the Calif- 
ornia Palace of the Legion of Honor, 
incorporating v/orks from the old masters 
to the contemporaries. 

6k Graphics (Prints and Drav/ings), 3 
Sculptures, 9 Books, illustrating the 
graphic vrork of the French artist, 

Auguste Rodin, accompanying an illustrated 
catalogue raisonee of Rodin’s graphics, 
l4l pages, by Dr, Victoria Therson. 

20 Prints by the French Contemporaries 
of Auguste Rodin: Albert Besnard, Eugene 
Carriere, Alphonse Legros, Camille 
Pissarro, Puvis de Chavannes, Odilon 
Redon, Pierre Auguste Renoir and Edouard 
Vuillard; to correlate \\d.th and comple- 
ment the Rodin exhibition in the adjoin- 
ing gallery, 

55 Prints and Draiangs acquired in the 
last eighteen months to this date by 
pirr chase and the gifts of various bene- 
factors, but excluding those of the 
Lilienthal bequest which was exhibited 
earlier in the year, comprising a small 
selection of the total of some 600 
acquisitiorxS for the period. 


- 14 - 


AGHENBACH FOUT-IDATION FOR GRAPHIC ARTS (Continued) 


Jose Luis Cuevas - Drav;in>'?s 

August l6-Septsniber 2o, 1975: 


51ea.nor Dickinson - Drp/ings 

October 8 - December 1975: 


Artistes Portraits & Self-Portraits 

December 20, 1975-February 29 j 1976: 


Artist’s Portraits u Self-Portraits 

December 20, 1975-February 29 j 1976: 


Edfcar Cliahine - Prints 
January 9-February 29, 1976: 


Japanese Ukiyo-e Prints 

March 13-May 9, 1976: 


liirn of the Century American Posters 

May 22-July l6, 1976: 


82 Recent Pen and Mash Dravn.ngs by tlte 
contemporary Mexican Artist, Jose Luis 
Cuevas, a circulating exhibition organ- 
ized by the Phoenix (Arizona) Art 
Museum, sponsored and e:diibited at the 
Phoenix Art Museum, Fine Arts Gallery 
of San Diego, Achenbach Foundation at 
California Palace of the Legion of 
Honor, Bienal de Sao Paulo, Brazil, 
and Museum of Contemporary Art, Mexico 
City. 

100 current line drav/ings in a constant- 
ly changing exhibition v/ith the artist, 
a 197^ San Francisco Art Festival Av/ard 
winner, at work, dravd.ng from models, in 
the exhibition gallery, A 30 page cata- 
logue \d.th full page illustrations was 
published. 

78 Prints, ranging through most of the 
print media, illustrating hov; artists, 
from the old masters dovm to the con- 
temporaries, have seen themselves and 
other artists, 

16 Prints borrovred from a San Francisco 
collection to complement the above 
exhibition. 

90 Period fraiTied prints by the late 
Armenian-French artist, Edgar Chahine, 
borrov/ed from the San Francisco col- 
lector, Albert Nalbandian, 

15 Japanese Color Prints by the master 
artists of the Ukiyo-e school, to com- 
plement the Tsutsmu exhibition of 
Japanese packaging, 

80 Posters by a number of American art- 
ists v/hose v/ork regularly appeared at 
the turn of this century in national 
publications such as Harper’s, Century, 
Scribner’s, Lippincott, and others, all 
from the recent bequest of the Arthur 
Barney collection. 


- 15 - 


ACIIENBACH FOUNDATION FOR QRAFEEC ARTS (Continued) 


DravrLnrrs by Gordon Baldvrin 2^ Precise Pen and Ink Draijings ty an 

’iviy 2*2 -July lb, 11^7 b: artist of the San Francisco Bay Area, 

197^-1976 Fiscal Year Totals; 12 exhibitions, comprising 718 objects of art. 


n. 

Following is a summaiy of the loan activity of the Achenbach Foundation for 
the 197^-1976 fiscal year; a coii^lete listing is found in Appendix I 

13 Loan& lent Out - lUS Items, li; Destinations, 

II 4 . Loans ^ AFQA - UoS Items, 27 Sources, 

27 Loans, 556 Items, Ul Sources and Destinations, 

in, ACQUISITIONS 


For a complete listing, see Appendix I 

A. Gift A.cquisitions 

1, DraTmigs - 8 drai'iings from 7 donors. 

2, Prints - 266 prints from 19 donors, 

B, Purchase Acquisitions 

1, Draxd.ngs - U draxdngs, 

2, Prints - 66 prints from 11 sources, 

IV, GIFTS TO THE ACHBNBACH LIBRABY 

7 books and miscellaneous equipment; see Appendix I 

V, TOTAL DS-ACCESSIO^S 
21 items; see Appendix I 

VI, BAT APEA GRAPHIC APTS COUNCIL 

The Bay Area Graphic Arts Council sponsored a varied series of events over 
the past year. Some of these events included the reception for Robeii: Flynn 
Johnson as the new curator of the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts, 
opening reception for the Edgar Chahine exhibition, lecture by Joseph R, 
Goldyne on Turner water colors and lecture by Robert Futernick on care of 
xvorks of art on paper. In addition, there were Saturday morning roundtable 
discussions in the Achenbach libraiy on Japanese woodcuts, American prints 
and Italian Old 1-^ster Draxirings, For more infoniiation on the Bay Area Graphic 
Alts Council see the Iiuseum Society’s report, 

Robert Flynn Johnson 
Curator-in-charge 
Achenbach Foxmdation 
for Graphic Arts 


- 16 - 


REGISTI?AR'S REPORT - M, H. de Yoiing Memorial Museum 


The 1975-1976 fiscal year proved to be atypical when compared vd.th past 
years at the de Young Museum, An increase in scheduled exhibitions, nev/ 
departments with added personnel, the de-accessioning project and the fact 
that over one-half of the museum was under construction added up to 
unparalleled diverse activities affecting the whole museum in general and 
the Registrar’s Office in particrular. These activities may be divided into 
three sections: 

Routine Procedures 


The Registrar continued to receipt, number, catalogue, insure safe housing 
and handling of and return of all incoming/outgoing gifts and extended 
loans to the permanent collection; arrange for the pick-up, receipt, safe 
keeping and return of all temporary exhibitions; be responsible for all 
storage facilities; review the receiving, unpacking, crating and shipping 
of all art objects; maintain the photography file and arrange for special 
reproduction orders; supervise the museum vehicle and its scheduling; 
and kept in order the Accession, Research, Archival, Uchibitions and 10 
other file systems. 

Some 10,255 objects in the above activities v/ere handled by the Registrar, 
assisted in various degrees by 6 graduate student volunteers and 7 Docent 
Council volunteers working for limited time periods, 1 driver/messenger 
and 5 quasi-Registration functionaries (a Curator I in charge of basement 
storage area, a Museum Shipper/Packer and the Museum Photographer). 

In addition, the Registrar -personally prepared the monthly insurance 
reports; handled damage and loss claims; conducted tours of his depart- 
ment and museum facilities; made records available to scholars, students, 
representatives from other institutions and qualified individuals; v/orked 
with local representative on Smithsonian Institution’s bicentennial 
project registering all American paintings in the country; ansv;ered 
written inquiries and was available, in the absence of curators, to 
answer telephone inquiries of a curatorial nature; continued to accompany 
the transport of art objects of more than nominal value; and supervised, 
in curators’ absences, the hanging of paintings or special movement of 
art objects through the museum. 

De-accession Project 

David Hyry and Sharon Hanford v/ere hired tharough CSTA in mid September 
1975 to help the Registrar v/ith the de-accession project. V/ork began on 
paintings and decorative arts items from the Kress Basement Storage Area 
in 6 galleries and hall areas closed to the public. In order to prepare 
lists to present to the Accessioning/De-accessioning sub-committee of the 
Board of Trustees vdien they came to inspect the objects September 20, 1975. 
the procedure established (and used in the preparation of subsequent lists) 


- 17 - 


REGISTRAR'S REPORT - M, H. de Young Memorial Museiara (Continued) 


consisted of: checicing each object to an accession number; where a number 
e>d.stcd, checldLng records for donor, date of accession and any additional 
information; and measuring and describing each object, \Vhere no numbers 
were found, an arbitrary "X" number v;as assigned to the piece, and complete 
accession records were made. The tedious aispects of the work and the frus- 
ti'ation of trying to correct errors made by former staff members in access- 
ioning records cannot be emphasized too strongly. The work v;as time con- 
suming and exacting. For the betterment of the museum collection, however, 
it vras a job that needed to be done, and it ^^ras v/ith this in mind that the 
project v;as approached by those who v;orked on it. 

At the September 20th meeting, 8 paintings, 5 pieces of furniture and 
approximately 285 war relics were approved for ds-accessioning by the 
committee, contingent upon final approval six months later. 

During the remainder of 1975* 42^7 pre-Columbian objects were inventoried, 
catalogued, photographed and listed, V/ith the approval of T, K. Seligman, 
Curator in Charge of the AOA collection, on April 4, 1976, 3247 objects 
were packed and sent to the San Francisco Unified School District on long- 
term extended loan for use in the public schools. The remaining 100 
objects ^^^ere left for de-accessioning or a possible loan to San Th’ancisco 
State University, Also, between April 7th and May 27th some 8l5 oilental 
objects v;ere transferred to the Asian Art Museum,, 

The Spring of 1976 was spent readying objects for inspection by the Board 
of Trustees. To stage the inspection properly: Gallery ?f9 was stripped 
dovm and dressed for the occasion, special lists were made, four Preparators 
(2 staff, 2 hired) spent one day arranging and the next day carrying objects 
for viewing by the committee. Present at the July 22nd meeting were the 
Director, 4 members of the Board of Trustees sub-committee, the Secretary 
to the Board, 5 Curators, the Registrar, Miss Hanford, acting as assistant 
to the Registrar and the 4 carriers, Tlie objects shovm were some 623 weapons, 
132 paintings, 111 decorative art items, 175 books and documents, and 297 
miscellaneous objects. These items, plus the ICOO AOA pieces, for a total 
of 2,338 objects, were given initial approval for de-accessioning by the 
committee to be viewed again in six months for final approval. The items 
reviewed in September 1975. were given final approval at the Ji-ily meeting, 

VJhen the Secretary to the Board filed her report on the event, some 36 pages 
v/ere added to the Minutes Book of the Board of Trustees. 

To complete the project, it remains to actually dispose of the objects 
designated for de-accessioning - no small task in itself - whether it be 
by public auction or fair trade as prescribed by official City policy. 

V/hen this is done, approximately 6,698 objects will have been removed from 
the museum as a result of extended loans, transfer or de-accessioning. 

There were 7 personnel involved in the de-accessioning project; 3 Civil 
Service, 2 CETA employees and 2 experienced v-zorkers hired for 2 days. 


- 18 - 


REGISTRAR’S REPORT - M. H. de Yoiing Memorial Museum (Continued) 


Relocation of Permanent Collection and Other Museum Property from Areas 

Desip:nated for Renovation and Partial Dismantling 


In the Fall- of 1975 j T, K, Seligman was assigned direction of all preparations 
at the de Young Museum necessary to clear spaces for remodelling in the 
proposed building renovation. The Registrar, because of similar experience 
at the Oakland Art Museum, during \7orld War II and elsewhere, was asked to 
assist in. over-seeing the project. 

Four men were hired on a contractural basis to help clear' the area 'and with 
the help of one CETA Preparator the project commenced December 15, 1975* 

Also participating, of course., . were various staff members v/hose departmental 
areas were affected by the new construction. In all, 30,798 square feet of 
museum space was affected by the renovation. Four used cargo containers, 
each containing 1,536 cu. ft,, were purchased for storage. We also hired 
the largest dumpster available, and by the time the piroject reached its 
conclusion on March 23, 1976 some nine such -open containers had been filled 
and carried away. A total of 8,308 art objects and salvageable pieces of 
museum property v;ere relocated elsewhere by 2 Civil Service personnel, 1 CETA 
employee . and 4 experienced workers hired -specially for the project. 

In summation, in addition to many activities not reducible to numbers, the 
Registrar -processed in detail some 10,255 objects in the normal routine and 
6,698- objects in the de-accession project for a total of 16,953 items, and 
handled personally - or supervised the movement of - some 8,308 items for a 
total of 25,^61 for the period 1975-1976, He xvas assisted in various degrees 
of capacity and for intermittent time periods by 5 Civil Service personnel, 

13 volunteers, 3 CETA employees and 6 experienced workers hired by other 
than City funds for a total of 2?. " 

For a listing of objects handled by this office, see Appendix II. 


Frederic Palmentier Snowden., Registrar 
M, H, de Young Memorial Museum 


- 19 - 


Srr.TCTSAP'O K-POM' - losion of Honor 


ao processins of Slloa^r?™ nfbf ", SeGistrar's tir,e. 

descriotion a^d stSare S e^o- h fr.volves individual condition 

of shipments, record!'Seotrp::/ insurance, aohednling 

■help of badi; needed aSSlS 

majority of the permanent" v .., 4 . ^egisj:rcition of the non- traveling 

voluateera ,.,ith Wns eirti^e Sd 

originated exhibition''"of^mOTe thIn°iffpesolre-icln^"^^*^°^ T' " 
object exacdnation notes were crStefalonv 1* f" Detailed 

auseucs in Hawaii and Seattle- aMrneS ^ *0 aid the 

upon collation of the ::-:;;-:;re1oSSLSd brS; 

and foSarding'^S the^Sia^.literp^eo^ 

'^ntil it left again on inte^^a^io-^^ landed at rhe S^x prancisco airport 
Ser\d.cas office^, Sal ^rtoiT* journ^ts, Registrar and Museum 

escorted evei^ ;ippo^t^ Sinllnt Sheriff's Department 

-e?s KgSs™ -hS:Se“E5S^^ 

l‘^iS°fL^bSrthnLsiS'"a^rSton^Sirf"-,""'"’'®’i?"' 

16 separate aimort shipments of up tn ti. '‘°? ‘'°^ ooUeciions, and oversaw 
the 116 Prench loth century raintiios Ipd 1®*®! Begirrins in June 1976, 

Norton Simon Museum of '^VtVaehtn ^ sculpture being returned to the 
Villiam Eoyd, and, at the reaues-“of^>-r"'® ®’^®^*^y '^ate'i BJ' Exhibit Packer 
to every piaie, reques, of the owner, escorted by the Registrar 


- 20 - 


REGISTRAR'S PJ3?0RT - Legion of lionor (Continued) 


In the fall of 1975* International V/omen’s Year, an ezdiibition of art by 
v/omen artists v;as assembled by the Registrar entirely from the Museums’ 
collections. An initial survey yielded a list of 250 rarely shovm art works 
of which 72 of mixed media were exhibited. Volunteers and Docents worked 
with the Registrar to augment individual art object records and to research 
6l v;omen artists’ careers over four centuries and in 11 countries. Gallery 
talks by the Registrar and volunteer Ebdiibition Assistant Angela Rice were 
given for interested Docents v;ho then gave public tours, some in sign-language 
for the Deaf, The Registrar produced free bibliographic brochures available 
in the exliibition. On three weekends slide talks, music, theater and poetry 
by v;omen, scheduled by the Program Office, were hosted by the Registrar in 
October and November 1975. Public response was enthusiastic. 

Other projects to v;hich volunteers contributed time included: cataloguing 
and creating I,D, photos of the .Arthur Putnam sculpture collection; labeling 
of art storage areas for improved inventory control; preparation of a storage 
room for eventual educational research use as an art Archives Room for older 
museum records; updating records of exhibitions and intra-museum transfers; 
answering correspondence and inquiries necessitating research into past 
records; answering and invoicing orders for photographs of Museum objects. 

The Registrar encouraged the following volunteers: Mary Long, Matt Hesemans, 
Jay Bricker and Betsy Graham - undergraduate artists and photography students 
from San Francisco State and Lone Mountain College; Linda V/atson, Toni Manuel 
and Ann Rasmussen - -undergraduate art history and history students from San 
Francisco State University and U, C, -Berkeley; Diane Dittemore - graduate 
Anthropology student from Denver; Pat Donovan and Angele Rice - independent 
M,A, Art Historians, Several Docents have also been of assistance in 
internal registration v/ork as well as independent research. 

For a complete listing of objects handled by this office, see Appendix III 


S, DeRenne Coerr, Registrar 
California Palace of the 
Legion of Honor 


- 21 - 


irUSEU:-! LIBRAI^Y 


As the fiscal year ended, the library v/as being greatly changed as part of the 
larger remodeling program being carried out at the de Young I-Iuseim, bhUe 
the current staff shortage vnll remain a problem, it is expected that the 
ne\-r quarters v-oll be a great improvement in security and improved v/orkLng and 
research conditions. 

Use of the Library 

Ihe library is used primarily by staff members and volunteers (including 
docents). It also ser'.'ed 77 members of the public (students, scholars, other 
researchers) by appointment during the last fiscal year. 

Staff 

mne library’’ cf The Fine Arts Museums is the only one in a museum of com- 
parable size in the United States v;hich operates vri.th a staff of one. 
Volunteers are helpful, but the need for a regular trained assistant is 
urgent. The nurfcer of staff members and volunteers v;ho use the library 
nncreases each year. The staff of the libra 2 :* 3 ' does not, 

^enbach Four4ation . Jpr. Grannie Arts Library 

Approxinazely 2/3 of the total collection of 3500 books has been catalogued, 
ms nas taken two years. The v/oric has been done by the librarian on a 
once-a-v;eek basis, with the help of tv/o excellent volunteers. But maintaining 
a cazalog^ae is a full tine job in most libraries; the work in the Achenhach 
nas oeen done at tne e^rpense of The Fine Arts Museums library in the de Young 
:nase''am, furthermore, the Aclienbach library is used by students and scholars 
and reogoires the assistance of at least a part-time professional librarian, 

B oplis Added to the Collection 

By Purenase : 1^7 

As gifts or Dy exchange ; 293 

-otal: Zfhg 

This represents fev;er purchases than last year, because the library budget 
•mas frozen by the City in late 1975 » dhe rsumber cf catalogues received on 
the exchange program, however, is higher this year. In 1575-1976 the 
library sent 163 copies of 3 museum catalogues to museums and libraries in 
she United States and abroad. 

Periodicals : cl titles are currently received. This is a lov;er number than 
last year (84 titles) due in part to periorUrals v/hioh have discontinued 
p'aclishing, but due more to bndgehery cuts. 


Jane Nelson, Librarian 


22 - 


EDUCATION DIVISION 


As one of the three major divisions within the Iluseums, the Education 
division is responsible for the use of the permanent and temporary col- 
lections to teach the public about: the history of art and culture, the 
appreciation of art, the mald.ng of art and the interrelationships between 
different forms of arts. To this end the division has several departments 
v/hich specialize in carrying out aspects of this responsibility. Each of 
the departments (Program, Art School, Docents and Volunteers) has its ovm 
report detailing its activities immediately after this report. 

The activities of ray office have been broadened this year as the overall 
programs of the Museums have continued to expand, Tlie primary areas of 
activity have been in overall museum planning, long range planning and 
reorganization of the Education division, special educational programs 
for exhibitions, and intern and volunteer training. 

This office has had a central role in the planning of the ne^^/ American V/ing 
and galleries currently under construction, as v/ell as in helping to 
formulate the long range development needs and plans of the Museums, 

This year we have also finally developed signage for each gallery explaining 
its contents as well as a map and gailery guide to help orient visitors to 
the Museiiras and aid them in making the choices they v;ant to make for their 
visit. 


In terms of the long-range planning for the Education division, we have been 
actively involved in trying to make our programs more responsix^e to the 
public. 

In the area of exhibitions, the educational programs that we put together 
for the exliibition American Art from the Collection of Mr, and Mrs, John D, 
Rockefeller 3nd v;as the most ambitious ever undertaken hj this Museum. 

V/e sponsored 2 coinrses in American Art history at the University of 
California-Berkeley, and Mills College, X’jhlch bussed the students to the 
Museums on a regular basis to study the works of art, V/e also trained 10 
students to give lectures on the exhibition; they gave over 50 free public 
lectures to different groups around the Bay Area. V/ith a generous grant 
from the National Endowment for the Humanities, v;e published a comprehensive 
handout on the exhibition including an historical background, bibliography, 
lists of programs at the Museums and around the Bay Area, V/e also produced 
a program called /m American Sampler (See Program Department for full 
description) and collaborated iidth U, C. Extension on a one-day scholarly 
symposium on American Art. 

Other exhibition-related activities have been varied. For the exhibition of 
Ancient Egyptian Art, ■Tma.ges for Eternity , v;e produced an audio visual 
program, a free brochure on the exhibition, sponsored two public lectures 
on the art and collaborated v/ith U, C, Extension on a symposium. For the 


- 23 - 


EDUCATION DIVISION (Continued) 


exhibition Fire, Earth and Water - Sculpture from the land Collection of 
h'esoanerican Art , ue produced an a-gdio ^/isual program outlining the coin^lex 
liistorj’- of Pre -Columbian I-Iexico as well as stimulating interpretative labels 
for each object. After we remodelled trro of our peimanent English galleries, 
we produced interpretative labels to stimulate the visitors ’ understanding 
and awareness. For the exhibition Day of the Dead honoring the Mexican 
festival, we developed interpretative labels arji worked with the San Fran- 
cisco School Department on special workshops for students. An exhibition 
called Introduction to I^inting Conservation x-ias developed to sho;-j hear a 
painting is treated after it is damaged, and we developed extensive didactic 
material for the exhibition including a free flyer handout explaining the 
process. For Women A.rtists from the Permanent Collections , we produced a 
free brochure, and for Three Centuries of French Art we developed intro- 
ductor^r wall labels and used quotations from the artists concerning their 
ait • For faster Paintings from the Hermitage and State Russian Museum , 
Leningrad are prodraced a 2h-page free handout explaining each painting and 
artist in the exhibition, based on a brochure oiigiTially publistied by the 
Ilational Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C, 

The last major area of involvement has been in the training in museum 
practices of interns from various universities including U, C, -Davis, 

U, C, -Berkeley ar^ Bernington College, the training of volunteers (including 
the orgarization of a Volunteer Council), and the continued training of and 
a-Tork ad.th Docents under the s’jpervision of a recently-hi 2 red Docent Coordinator, 

The most irrmortant continuing aspect of this entire program aiill be in the 
reorganization of the Education Division, using the results of public surve^^ 
on various aspects of the Museums * performance, so that the various depart- 
ments are effectively working together at all levels to bring the best possible 
programming to the public. 


'Thomas K, Seligman 
A-Ssistant Director 
Education Division 


- 2ii - 


PRCGI?^M OFFICE 


The progranHning for fiscal 1975-76 reflects our interest in developing a 
closer relationship betv/een the Performing Arts Programs and the E:diibition 
Programs to reach a v/ider museum audience and to enhance both the exliibitions 
and the programs. Examples of that philosophy were reflected in the series 
of programs related to the exhibition V/omen Artists and in the humanities 
series entitled "An American Sampler: l8th and 19th Century Arts and Enter- 
tainment," produced in conjunction with the exliibition of American Art from 
the Collection of Mr, and Mrs, John D« Rockefeller 3rd , The American Issues 
Forum awarded S6^5C0 to the Museums for production of a brochure for the 
exhibition. In addition to these sizeable efforts, the program office was 
involved in the production of many other events held in conjunction with 
exhibitions , 

Vi/ith the advent of admission charges to the Museums, the program office 
also instituted a 75^ charge to programs, V/e felt that most people v;ould 
not readily give a donation at the Theater after having paid to get into 
the building. The attendance at the programs was affected by the change 
in policies, but revenues increased for the Performing Arts Programs, 

Tlie Little Theater, felt by many to be one of the finest small theaters in 
the area, was greatly improved v/ith the removal of the canvas top and the 
re finishing of the stage floor. This allov/s for great flexibility in the 
use of the stage and in some instances (such as the Dance Series) reduces 
costs since special considerations for the floor have become unnecessary. 

The organ concerts presented by staff organists Ludv/ig Altman and Nevrton 
Pashley continue to draw v;hat is quite nearly a group of devotees. Ad- 
mission charges have affected the attendance. 

The Tivilight Concerts v/ere moved from the de Young Museum to the Legion 
of Honor during the Chinese Exhibition, The results of the move were con- 
sidered positive, and Ti'd-light Concerts at the Legion of Honor are continuing 
Attendance is hjLgh and audience response quite good, 

"An American Sampler" 


The ideas for this series emerged from the Program Office and the Docent 
Council simultaneously, Tlie goal was to present a look at various points 
in American history and at the ways which artists of different disciplines 
used to make a statement about those times, Wanda Corn, art historian, 
professor at Mils College, and Guest Curator for the American Art Exhibition 
was selected as Artistic Director for the American Sampler Series, A Com- 
mittee was selected which in addition to Dr. Corn consisted of the folloMng 
people: Stephen Arkin-Literature , San Francisco State UrJLversity; V/esley 
Chamberlin- Art History, San Francisco State University; Sister Mary Dominic- 
American Music Research Center, Dominican College; Paul Karl strom- Archives of 
American Art; and Dianne Sachko-Leni Sloan Dance-Lone Mountain College. At 
the end of the series a written evaluation was obtained from the audience 
which will be useful in setting up future programs of this sort. 


- 25 - 


PKCC.rvAM OFFICE (Continued) 


f-!ur.eujii Tlieatro 


In November 1975 1 acting on a proposal submitted by Robert V/oodruff, the 
Program Office made a public announcement concerning the solicitation of 
nev/, unproduced (in the Bay Area) short tv;o act plays by local playwrights. 
By January the Program Office had received over 300 scripts. Due to the 
overv/helming response and other factors, we decided to postpone presentation 
until the Fall of 1976 and to seek additional funding, 

ACUAA 

In addition to its continued membership in the Western Alliance of Arts 
Administrators, the Museums nov/ have membership in the Association of 
College, University and Community Arts Administrators, Inc, (ACUAA), a 
national organization v;hich holds conferences related to all aspects of 
performing arts - presentations, planning, and behind the scenes aspects. 

In addition, ACUAA has several publications which contain useful information 
ranging from sample contracts to audience surveys. 

Volunteer Council 


The Program Office was responsible for the reorganization of the Volunteer 
Council and for the publication of the Volunteer Handbook. The reorganization 
included orientation sessions v;hich were designed to give volunteers a sense 
of the variety of activities which occur in the Museums and to put the staff 
in touch with museum volunteers. The Volunteer Handbook was designed to 
provide supplementary information concerning the Museums’ operations and 
procedures. In addition, a Current Events book and an artists’ card file 
were developed for use by Volunteers, 

Under the supervision of staff coordinator Ola Kupka, volunteers sei*ve the 
year round on public information desks at the Legion of Honor and de Young 
Museums, In the past year volunteers were placed on special assignments in 
the office of the Director, in the Library and in the Development, Regis- 
tration, Programming, Exhibitions and Conservation department. Volunteers 
serve on a regular basis in the Public Relations office, the Achenbach 
Foundation for the Graphic Arts and in the Museum Society offices. 

During major public exhibitions, volunteers sell tickets, catalogues and 
Acoustiguides, distribute surveys and educational handouts, and work in the 
Museum Bookshop, Daring the Chinese Archaeological Exhibit, the Hermitage 
Exhibit and the Rockefeller Exhibit volunteers served a total of l6,300 hours, 

A total of 179 volunteers completed one of the five Volunteer Training and 
Orientation Sessions offered in 1973-76. 


- 26 - 


THE DE YOUNG ART SCHOOL 


The de Young Museum Art School is a non-profit educational corporation 
within the administrative structure of The Fine Arts Museums of San Fran- 
cisco, City and County of San Francisco. The Art School is a department 
in the E,ducation Ei‘ vision of the museum, employing 3^ artists to share 
their skills and resources with the museum, the school system, other cul- 
tural and educational institutions, and the Bay Area community at large. 

It is the purpose of the Art School to develop educational and cultural 
programs in conjunction with the museuiii; these include studio art classes, 
production of films, video and slide presentation, art programs for the 
San Francisco Unified Schools, art events for communities, exhibitions, 
and consultant work for other non-profit agencies. 

In the 1975-76 fiscal year, the Art School relocated from the de Young 
Museum to a downtoira location at Hov/ard Street and New Montgomery. The 
move was necessitated by the museum’s building project: new American galleries, 
a restaurant, workshops and new Art School quarters. Existing programs vi/ere 
lost, but new programs began. A majority of the past students no longer 
enrolled in classes, but a business commimity audience developed, and programs 
for this audience emerged. There are no longer classes for children nor a 
curriculum based on the museum collection, but now there are professional 
studios for jewelry, photography, printmal^ing, painting and drai\dng, a \’ldeo 
and film resource department, and a thriving Dovmtown Art Gallery at 651 
Howard Street, 

The move has resulted in a financial loss to the Art School of :|$8,000 expended 
in moving and renovation costs. This figure coupled with a monthly overhead 
of an estimated 4^1,700 per month and a decrease in student fees presents 
a tremendous biirden to the Art School, 

At the museum location, there were no rent, utilities, garbage collection or 
telephone costs, yet the Art School has survived these increased costs 
vn.thout any financial support from the museum or the City and County of 
San Francisco, 1/ith a 56/o decrease in student attendance and constantly 
rising operating costs, the Art School faces problems but hopes to maintain 
a program at the Downtovra Center through June 1977* The school \d.ll return 
to the de Young Museum in the \^d.nter of 1977 with a full class schedule 
slated for March of that year. 

The dedication of the Art School staff (5^?^ of which are artists working 
through the Mayor’s Office of Employment and Training (C.E.T.A.), combined 
with community support and assistance from the museums, the San Francisco 
Art Commission’s Neighborhood Arts Program, the California Historical Society, 
the San Francisco Library, and the San Francisco Zoo, enabled the Art School 
to continue its programs and to expand in new directions to meet some of this 
city’s ciiltural needs. For a list of Art School persormel, see Appendix VI. 


- 28 - 


PKCX}RAM OFFICE (Continued) 


Sunii^iary 


ProGrains presented in whole or in part by the Frograni Office, with their 
total attendance fi/];\ires, are as follows: 

Number of 


rrofrrams 


Attendance 


Exhibition Related Programs 

10,800 

36 

V/eekend Performing Arts 

7,200 

30 

Other Performing Arts 8c 



Special Events 

10,000 

104 

Organ Concerts 

10,400 

3 

Twilight Concerts 

2,300 

21 

Outside Organizations 

— 


TOTAL 

40,900 


For a listing of specific events sponsored by the Program Office, see 
Appendix IV 


Bruce Merley 
Charles Mills 
Assistant Curators, 
Programs and Education 


- 27 - 


THZ DS YQW.G AS? SCPICCL (Continued) 


In the 1975-76 fiscal year the Art School was responsible for the foUov/in^ 
projects and pro grans: 

Classes 

Prior to the relocation, the Art School functioned as it has for the past 
ten years offering studio classes for children and adults that related to 
the museum collection, as v;ell as drop-in studio workshops relating to 
temporary e^chibitions , artist demons trs.tions and field trips. Durdng the 
1975-76 year, l 6 l 7 adults and 1145 children attended studio classes, -and 
54 cO people attended drop-in classes and ’workshops. 


Perhaps the most obvious change was the suspension of classes for children. 

The nev; location did not meet the Field A.ct code for a school nor was the 
neighborhood conducive to children, A limited program for children, however, 
has continued v/ith classes being held in the galleries of the de Young Museum, 
the Legion of Plonor, and the Academy of Sciences. 

Tri p-Out Tiycks / Trio-Cut Tnorlcs 

The Trip-out Truck is a mobile outreach program conducted b^.^ the Art School 
which brings artists, art programs, and art objects to the schools and to 
community locations in San Francisco. The -program has t’wo brightly painted 
vans well stocked \-rLth supplies and a staff of ten artist/instructors from 
the Art School ’who 'work nart time on the trucks. There are also eight suit- 
case exhibits, called Trip-out Trunks, containing masks, textiles, puppets, 
je’welry, ceramics, printmaking, calligraphy and basketry, ’which are either 
used on the trucks or loaned to classroom teachers. The trucks operate all 
year, 3 to 4 days each ’week. V/e have more requests for the program from the 
teachers than v/e can possibly fill. Funding for the trick program during thns 
fiscal year ’was provided by the National Zndo’/.’ment for the Arts Special 
Projects and the Museum Society, Tnere ’was no cost to the City and County of 
San Francisco, 

The Trip-out Truck program ’wcrlcs ’vith classroom teachers to create an art 
program that v/ill assist both the student and the teacher, Tliis 3 /ear we 
decided to do a more formal evaluation of the program to find out how teachers 
and students react to specific aspects of our program. The results indicate 
that teachers are aided in developing ne’w instructional materials and ’wa 3 /s 
to organise projects, and they gain confidence in teacrJng about art objects. 
Students get more indivHdual assistance, feel mors freedom in their art 
projects and learn to face stiffen educational challenges. 

The trucks once again received national recognition as the program is featured 
in a -video tape on CETA artists produced bvr Optic Ner’/e and is a fea-tured 
program in the National Sndovmient for the Arts City S-cirit film by Glen Fleck, 
In summar 3 /, the trucks visited l4l schools and 17 commuriity centers, and 
reached a total of 53 j 321 children and ad-ults. 


- 29 - 


AKT SCHOOL (Continued) 


Exiiibitions 


Tlio Art School remained active in the museum's exhibition program with the 
following contributions; 

Made \d.th Paper - July-August 1975 - Legion of Plonor 

This was a small exliibit organized by Chere Mah, a Rockefeller Fellow, 
showing uses of paper for art and for utilitarian purposes. 

Callir:raphy - The Art of Beautiful Handwriting - September-November 1975 - 
Legion of Honor 

Tlie Calligraphy collection from the San Francisco Public Library was dis- 
played along 'AO-th the tools of the calligrapher. 

The Food E:<hibit - November 1975-January 197^ - de Young Museum 
This was a year long major project tackled by the Art School staff. The 
purpose of the exhibit was to shov; the art and rituals of the various 
ethnic groups residing in the San Francisco Bay Area. Food was selected 
as the theme because it provided a common element. This program would not 
have been possible without C.E.T.A. personnel, 

Tlie Pursuit of Happiness - American Issues Forum - May- June 1976. 

California Historical Society 

C.E.T.A. personnel v/orked together in research, photography, and design to 
produce a community traveling exliibit for the California Historical Society. 
The exliibit based on the theme. Pursuit of Happiness, focused on California 
as the land of plenty and illustrated concepts with details from San Fran- 
cisco's VJPA murals. 

Zoo Introduction to Animal Habitat , an exhibition at the San Francisco Zoo 
which provides an introductory experience for the zoo visitor. Prepared by 
two Rockefeller/NEA Training Fellov/s assisted by C.E.T.A, personnel, it 
includes folk art apieces of animals, prints, photographs and dravm.ngs. 

There has been a grant proposal submitted to the National Endowment for the 
Arts for the purpose of expanding this project to include more panels and 
video tapes a.bout the zoo. 

Mural Projects - Four major works of art were produced id-th private funding 
and available monies from the museum's exhibition allocation of the City and 
County of San Francisco: 

Johji Rampley and John V/ehrle worked on v/ooden panels in the de Young Museum 
parking lot to produce two murals; the two artists completed a landscape 
mural at Kaiser Foundation Hospital in South San Francisco; and Jose Grant, 
also a C.E.T.A. artist v/orking vith the Art School, singlehandedly found 
funding and executed a mural at the Page and Gough Street mini -park. 

Film and Video Productions 


Using film and video as a tool for education about the visual arts and about 
museums, the Art School has established a department of film and video under 
the direction of Michael Lerner, with Alan Babbitt and Michael McMillan, a1 1 
C.E.T.A, artists 


- 30 - 


ART SCHOOL (Continued) 


Video tapes and multi-media slide shows have been produced in conjunction 
with exhibitions and for circulation to schools and to community centers. 
The follovm.ng video tapes are presently available: 

1) Calligraphy - Methods and Styles 

2) Preparing for and Painting a Mural 

3) Tlie Masked Recycler - Use of Recycled Materials for Teaching Art 

4) Loyd Reynolds, Calligrapher 

5) Conservation of V/orks on Paper 

6) Making a Mannequin for the Exhibition of Textiles 
Dov/ntovm Art Center 


This two story brick building at 631 Howard Street has become the temporary 
home of the de Young Museum Art School as well as an exhibition space or 
branch gallery of the museum. Over 90,000 persons v/ork in a ten block radius 
of the Downtov;n Center; it is this audience we v/ant to serve. In addition 
to the exhibitions and classes, programs are offered at lunch time and after 
work for the business community, such as Video Lunches, Mixed Media Art 
Adventures, Textile V/orkshops, Ceramic Field Tinps, Architectural V/alking 
Tours, Ceramic Lectures and Demonstrations, Printmald.ng Demonstrations and 
Workshops, and Life Drawing Studios. 

Museum Training and Intern Programs 

The de Young Museum Art School has been involved in training persons for 
work in museum education and in providing museum experience for young persons 
for the past three years; it is helped by the Art School's varied programs 
and close relationship with the school district and other community agencies. 

I, Training for Museum Professionals : The Rockefeller/National Endowment 

for the Arts Training Fellowsliips in Museum Education. 

Ten persons were selected from the thirteen western states to participate in 
a work/study program concentrating on museum education and community arts 
administration. The purpose of the project is to provide practical expeiuence 
and professional training in the form of seminars and field trips for persons 
v;ho wish to enter the museum profession, 

II, Training Program for Teenagers and Young Adults. 

In the summer of 1975 the National Endowment for the Arts Expansion Arts 
Program and the Neighborhood Youth Corps program provided funds and salaries 
for a youth v;ork/study project. Nine students were recruited from every area 
of the city to work in the museum and in the urban outreach programs. The 
program has been funded again this summer and is being coordinated by tv/o 
C.S.T.A, artists. 


- 51 - 


AKT SCHOOL (Continued) 


C.E>T.A. ProfTrani - Tlie Mayor’s Office of Sirployraent and Training 

Tliroughout the year, Art School projects were initiated and conducted by 
C.E.T.A, employees, a federally funded employment program addressed to the 
national problem of unemployment. The Art School supervised and supported 
tlie projects of twenty C.E.T.A, artists. In addition, five C.E.T.A, personnel 
v;ere assigned to the Art School through The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, 
Tliis program has benefited the San Francisco artist who is traditionally un- 
employed or underemployed, the city's education and cultural institutions, 
and the people of San Francisco, 

Tlie C.E.T.A, program has acted as a catalyst to the Art School program and 
has provided a strong and dedicated staff to initiate projects and to meet 
community cultural needs. It has further enabled the Art School to 
coordinate programs v/ith the other city agencies who share our C.E.T.A., 
personnel; the San Francisco Zoo, Kearny Street V/orkshop, Jackson Street 
Gallery, California Historical Society, the Maritime Museum, San Francisco 
Neighborhood Arts, San Francisco Unified School District, Chicano/Xatino 
conmnunity programs, and the San Francisco Public Library. 

It ’.dJLl be a major loss to the de Young Museum Art School, The Fine Arts 
Museums of San Francisco, and to the community at large should the C.E.T.A, 
artist project end this coming fiscal year. 


Elsa Cameron, Curator in charge 
de Young Art School 


- 32 - 


COUNCIL 


' Docent Council Profrrams 

The primary function of the Docent Council is to interpret the permanent 
collections and special exliibitions of the Asian Svrt Museum and Tlie Fine 
Arts Museums to the museum visitor - adults, school children and special 
groups of senior citizens, the deaf community, and educational groups of 
all ages. Secondarily, docents provide support to the staff by doing 
research, library v/ork, special projects such as tapestry conservation, 
and assisting in the Registrar's office. 

To acliieve its primary goal in a professional manner, the Docent Council 
gives its members advanced and continuing training in the Arts of Asia, 
Europe, Africa, Oceania, and the /imericas. This past year such training 
was handled in several v;ays: through lectures and seminars by professors 
from near-by universities or from the Ilxuseums’ staff. In addition, sma 3.1 
monthly v/orkshops organised by docents themselves were devoted to specific 
topics in v;hich docents felt they needed further v;ork. Attendance at the 
weekly advanced training is mandatory if a docent is to continue to tour 
actively. Docents give a minimum of two tours per month. 

In 1975-1976 the Docent Council, with guidance from the Museums' staff, 
provided continuing training v/ith the emphasis on developing "participatory" 
tours for the visitor. All western docents are nov; qualified to give tours 
at both the de Young and Legion of Honor museums for the first time since 
their merger, and sixteen docents completed their two-year training in the 
Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas and are now qualified to tour 
in these galleries. 

Another facet of the Docent Council is its "Docents for the Deaf Program," 
established six years ago to reach the deaf community of all ages and to 
enable them to enjoy more fully the resources of our Iliuseums, An advanced 
class of thirteen and a beginning class of six docents were given training 
in sign language and lip reading, vn.th funding for the teacher provided by 
the San Francisco Community College District, TTiis program was further 
supported and its services consequently expanded b^r a grant from The San 
Francisco Foundation, In June, as a part of Deaf Awareness V/eek, the 
Docents for the Deaf gave a "celebration" for the Bay Area deaf community 
vn.th films and theatre, Tliis program is known not only in this area, but 
nationally as well; other museums have vised it as a model for their ovn 
programs. 

By operating on an extremely tight budget in the past fiscal year, the 
Docent Council was able to hire a Docent Coordinator, Ms. Lizabeth Cohen, 

As a member of The Fine Arts Museums staff, her function is to serve as 
liaison to the staff and to work with docents in evaluating their programs 
and in developing new ones. Her first resioonsibility in this position v;as 
to expand the School Program and to increase communication with the San 
Francisco Unified School District and neighborhood and community centers. 


- 53 - 


DQCI^NT COU^ICIL (Continued) 


Tl:e Docent Council provides daily tours of the permanent collections and 
special exliibitions. In addition, the Docent Council gives tours to special 
groups - college classes, convention visitors, and members of national or 
international art groups including tours in foreign. languages, 

Tlie Docent Council provides a valuable service to the nuseums it serves - 
as its members and their tours are the primary interface .between the col- 
lections and the public - and lool^ forward to expanding its programs and 
services. 

Lucy Pfund Kartell, Chairman 
Docent Council. 1975-1976 

Docent Council School Program 


Tlie School Program offers participatory museum experiences- -to school, grcra-ps 
primarily from the 2nd through 12th grades. Our objective is to develop 
cultural av/areness and, visual skills in children through exciting inquiry^ 
into the art of Asia, America and Europe, and the traditional arts of- Africa, 
Oceania, and the Americas. Our specific goals for the program this ’year 
included v;orking more closely v/ith the San Francisco public schools, and 
striving for better integration of the museum visit with on-going .classroom 
teaching. Accomplishment of the latter goal called for much. joint planning 
and coordination between museum staff, docents and teachers. 

Communication v.dth teachers and schools was aided by the presence- of three 
part-time Museum Teaching Assistants. Tlie Museum Teaching Assistant-..and the 
docents v;ould evaluate after every tour how well the program met the -original 
goals and ho\/ effective the over-all experience v/as for the oliildren.- 
School docents give at least one tour a v;eek, participating as a member- of 
a team that gives regular tours a specific day each v;eek, Vdiile most of our 
teaching occurs in the museum, on occasion programs are planned for the 
classroom as well. 

To improve coordination between the museum and schools, the 'School Program 
offered several v;orkshops to groups of teachers to acquaint them v/ith museum 
resources and suggest classroom activities that prepare students for and 
follow-up a museum visit. V/e also began to develop curriculum materials for 
use by teachers to assist in their integration of the museum id.th the class- 
room. In this coming year, v/e look forv;ard to expanding both -of these efforts. 

The follov/ing are examples of some of the programs offered in conjunction 
vdth the San Francisco Unified School District. 

1, \Je participated in an "African Safari" program organized, by the Environ- 
mental Science Center of the San Francisco Public Schools., Otir oontidbution 
involved training eight 9th graders from Presidio Junior High Scliool to be 
guides for 27 classes from three elementary schools. The girides helped the 
cliildren look at hov; African artists and craftsmen portrayed through art 
the same animals they had explored at the zoo, The Academy of Sciences, and 
in their classrooms. 


- 3 ^ - 


DOCSIIT COUI'ICIL (Continued) 


2. I7e participated in a v;orkiihop for ESEA Multi- Cultural teachers, suggestir." 
v/ays that a museuEi visit oriented around .-.fii.can £irt might make a study of 
Black History more exciting, 

3. V/e gave a v;orkshop at the museum to the Social Studies department of Luther 
Burbank Junior High School to explore v/ays that teachers could use the museum 
in many areas of their teaching. 

4. I7e v/orked v/ith forty resource teachers and aides from the Teacher Learrnmg 
Center of the SFUSD to plan museum experiences that developed skills of 
verbal and vnritten comiiiunication in primary school children. 

5o V/e offered a session to teachers of career education through the Industry- 
Education Council v;here v/e demonstrated the importance of visual skills in 
all vocations, encouraged instruction aimed at their development, and sug- 
gested the important role museum visits can play in these efforts. 


Lizabeth Cohen 

Assistant Curator, Education 


- 35 - 


An-IIl'IISTRATIOIJ DIVISION 


As one of the three major divisions ^^rithin the l^useums, the Administrative 
Division is responsible for the preparation and administration of the City 
budget, personnel, maintenance, security of the buildings and collections, 
development of new sources of funding, and generally for the coordination 
of activities id.thin the Museums* three major divisions. This past year I 
have been responsible for the planning, administration and coordination of 
the complex de Young renovation project, an exciting project which will 
serve many needs of the Museiims, 

Security 

The security staff is responsible for the safety of art objects, visitors 
and the two buildings (including the Asian Art Itiseum),. Considering the 
Iiigh attendance and lovr average number of guards per gallery, theft or 
major damage was miniriial. However, daytime protection against vandalism 
continues to be our biggest problem. Our gua]7d force is supplemented by 
eight CETA personnel (compared to II4. last year) but is well belca-r minimums 
for reasonable coverage of the galleries. If it were not for the extensive 
renovation being conducted at the de Young Museum, causing us to close large 
areas of the imiseum, we might have had to close sections of the museum to 
the public so that other areas could be mors adequately secured. 

We are looking for more effective ways of utilizing the relatively small 
guard force we have. At the suggestion of the Police Department, some blazer- 
type uniforms have been purchased by the Board of Trustees 5 hox^ever, this 
small number needs to be increased to be more effective. The uniforms have 
added to the visibility of the guards while in the galleries. 

Personnel 


The Muse-ums have been greatly aided by CETA guards, clerks, preparators and 
community workers. Without this help, we would certainly have had difficulty 
maintaining the present level of public service. ¥e continue to have diffi- 
culty filling key curatorial positions due to salaiy levels which are behind 
other museijms, locally and nationall3r. The salaiy imbalance between certain 
Ifuseum positions and other City employees continues to create a situation of 
low morale. 

The Museums also suffer from the lack of curatorial depth in various depart- 
ments, Basic clerical staff is now so thin as to impose great hardships 
during absences due to illnesses or vacations. Even more discouraging is 
having curators, conservators, registrars and the like spending their valuable 
time doing routir^ clerical work. 

On the positive side, the Museum Society - through direct financial aid - 
and volunteers have provided additional personnel support. The staff chart 
at the front of this report illustrates the importance of this help. VJhat 
the chart does not shoi^ are the 50 nex7 volunteers x^ho work for the Museum 
on a daily basis in all facets of musexmi operations. We are gratef-ul for 
their support, 

1 , CETA is a federally fxinded x^rk training program. 


- 36 - 


Physical Plant 


The two antiquated buildings continue to require massive transfusions of 
maintenance and repair dollars* The leaking roof problem for now has been 
resolved. Poor ventilation and the lack of air conditioning is now our 
major concern^ it threatens the veiy existence of the art objects. Also 
excessive amounts of natural light in some galleries, combined I'lith too 
little artificial light in others, plagues the exhibition of our collecbionj 
the one deteriorates most art objects, and the other limits proper viewing. 

We have been fortunate to get help from the Pluseum Society and from the 
National Endowment for the Arts to correct one portion of this problem with 
an in-galleiy lighting system for several galleries at the Legion of Honor. 

¥e shall continue to need, and therefore request, capital improvement funds 
to complete the job. 

In March 1976, as part of San Francisco's bicentennial celebration, a major 
renovation project at the de Young Museum was begun. Of primaiy interest 
will be the construction of 5^000 square feet of nei'i gallery space to exhibit 
the American paintings and decorative arts from the Museum -s permanent col- 
lection. Opening is scheduled for May 1977* An additional 10,000 square 
feet of neiiT space is being created by excavating under the existing galleries 
and adjacent to the existing basement; when com.pleted in March 1977j it will 
provide modernized art storage. The existing basement is to be converted into 
a suite of conservation laboratories for paintings, decorative arts and textiles. 

As a part of the renovation, a new restaurant facility is being created which 
will open onto the Oakes garden. This has been one of the most requested 
services by visitors. Staff offices also are being renovated to create mor^ 
practical utilization of existing space. The library will be more efficient 
and secure. The art school is being reoriented so that students enter the 
rear of the building, thereby increasing our security and decreasing our 
overhead. The loading of art objects and non-art objects will be somewhat 
separated and controlled, and a new guard station will be able to control all 
acti-^/ities at the ser/ice entrance of the Iliseum. In general, the renovation 
T’lill provide a resolution of the many past security problems caused by the 
poor physical design of the building. 

The entrances to both Museums continue to provide architectural barriers to 
the physically handicapped. Ramps are needed to remedy this situation, A 
temporary wooden one was installed at the Legion of Honor this spring, but 
because of certain physical limitations, the costs of a temporary ramp at 
the de Young are prohibitive, A raii^ for the de Young was requested in the 
City budget, but eventually was deleted as not having high enough cityc'jide 
priority. 

With the institution of admission fees, we were faced with a difficult 
sitiiation of finding a way of collecting fees in buildings not designed for 
ihat purpose. We corntantly st?d.ve to provide the visitor a warm and com- 
fortable environment; easy orientation and information; free access to our 
bookshop; free admission of large groups of school children; proper security; 
and at the same time to collect the admission fees as efficiently and econ- 
omi Crt . ll y as possible. It ■will be necessary to provide funds for a planning 
study of all these conflicting components so that we can effectively re- 
design each entrance. Hopefully, we can integrate a rairp for the elderly and 
the handicapped into our p3a.nningo 


- 37 - 


Budp:et 


Due to ail ever-shrinking budget, we are forced to look for other sources of 
income and re-examine our programming. If we continue to have a lack of 
adequate personnel and supporting funds, we vri.ll be forced to decrease the 
number of exhibitions and special programs which will undoubtedly have a 
negative impact upon our attendance and certainly upon our service. 

It our contention that the Museums are a major asset to the City, providing 
a good return on the tax dollar. The Museums are a significant attraction 
for tourists and visitors from afar as vrell as from the Bay Area, Furthermore, 
a strong foundation of City support attracts private and federal monies to 
support I-Iuseum activities. The renovation at the de Young is an example of 
hoi-j- vie were able to get support both locally and nationally for the Museums, 
The $2,Ii. million being spent on this program is providing jobs in the City 
as well as eliminating 10 previously requested projects worth $2,09 million 
which have been included in the Capital Improvements Advisoiy Coiranittee ’s 
Six Year Program, Thus, this money serves two purposes: providing jobs and 
eliminating ad valorem tax money to do this viork. 

The following chart compares the major programs of the Museum T-iith the corres- 
ponding financial sources of revenue. In summary, almost 2 ^ private dollars 
vrere spent last year for each dollar of City support. 

In order to maintain this private interest, v^e must have the continued support 
of our operations vri.th an adequate City budget, 

BUDGET COMPAEISOMS - FISCAL 1975-76 



Expenses 

Expenses 

Income 


City 

Non-City 

Non-City 

Collections 

¥27lI5BIi 


$ 

Publications 


231,250 

^2,250 

Exhibitions 

Conservation 

211,91? 

It5,100 

357,702 

U91,702 

Education 

Sh,919 

235,il5 

I58,ia5 

:\rt School 

h6,82h 

198, 285 

183,785 

Adminis t lation 

ao,358 

U3U,000 

U25,800 

Secrurity 

j-laintenance 

Capital Improvements: 

S63,o-}k 

297,799 

3,025 

3,025 

de Young Museum Renovation 


2,1(00,000 

2,ii00,000 

Renovation of English Room 
■Moii-allo ca ted 

125, 238 

13,000 

13,000 

Bookshop 

500,000 

800,000 

Museum signage and maps 
I'iiseum Society reserve 


7, 200 
155,300 

7, 200 

Totals 

#l,bS6,77l 

$1,535,177 

$1(,535,177 


- 38 - 


Admissiong 


In August 1975 the Board of Trustees decided to institute an admission charge 
rather than suffer a major budget cut proposed by the Board of Supervisors. 

It was implemented December 1, 1975« Ttie Museums are open every day of the 
year from 10:00 AI^l to 5:00 PM. For persons age 18-65 admission is 75?i; persons 
age 12-18, 250; persons under 12 or over 65 , Museum Society Members, Society 
for Asian Art Members, Museum Trustees, Other Museum Professionals, members of 
ICOM, AAI'^, WAAI4, AAI-ID and BAGAC, Guests as may be determined by the Museum 
and members of organized educational groups including the person in charge 
are Free, Payment of one fee covers admission to the Asian Art Museum, M. H. 
de Young Memorial Museum and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor on 
the same day. Admission is free on the first day of the month. The Museum 
Society may charge a separate fee for admission to Museum Society sponsored 
special Exhibitions and events, 

Vihile raising revenue, the admissions charge has had the effect of drastically 
reducing attendance. At the de Young, attendance for the first 7 months since 
the admission charge v;as levied has been 229,092, compared to an adjusted 
average attendance for the same period for the 2 previous years when admission 
was free of 33^,724 for a net reduction of 32, 7/^. 

At the Legion of Honor, attendance for the first 7 months since admission 
charge was levied has been 135,678, compared to an adjusted average attendance 
for the same period for the 2 previous years when admission v;as free of 
281,663 for a net reduction of 41,3/'^, 

The average reduction in attendance for both Museums compared to the 2 previous 
years is 36 . 7?^ • 

Of interest is that we average a 21/o increase in daily attendance on days v;hen 
admission is free at the de Young, Because of the timing of the Russian show, 
the corresponding figure for the Legion of Honor v/ould not be representative and 
is thus not shown. 

V/e feel that it is too early for a realistic comparison of attendance figures 
because of fluctuating exhibition schedules from year to year. See Appendix 
VIII for the Museums Admission Fund Statement of Revenues and Expenditures, 

Develonment 


As the link between the staff and the Board of Trustee’s Development Committee, 
Ann M, Knoll, Development Officer, v/as responsible for assistance to the 
Development Committee in raising funds for the de Young Renovation Project and 
for advising in matters of individual , foundation and government support. She 
prepared and processed grant applications, administering grants to The Fine -Arts 
Museums Foundation and the de Young Museum Art School, 

The Development Office assisted in an ambitious capital drive to raise new funds 
for the de Young Renovation, estimated at S2.4 million. Given incentive by a 
S400,000 challenge grant from the Charles E. Merrill Trust, the drive success- 
fully accomplished its goal. 


- 39 - 


Since this success j the Development Committee has been aware of the 
continuing need for an ongoing capital fund-raising program at the 
>!u3eiims; consequently, a development drive is being prepared in concert 
x-xith the I-iiseuma* plan* In this plan we will be able to pinpoint 

the areas of activity where peimanent funding is required, such as ongoing 
refurbishment and maintenance of the museums, endowments for curators hips, 
and a special purchase fund for major acquisitions* An aggressive, com- 
prehensive and ambitious development plan xd.th his objectives would offer 
dramatic opportunities for individuals, corporations and foundations to 
join in providing The Fine Arts Miseums of San Francisco :d.th a solid 
financial base* 

In previous years, the Development Office had been concerned primarily t-ri.th 
sustaining an active grant program, principally with the National Endoi'ment 
for the Arts and Humanities* This past year, how-ever, has been one in which 
other sources of revenue have been sought* Nonetheless, a number of grants 
have been ai-xarded to the Museums, and several are still pending. A list of 
grant activity appears in Appendix VII. 


Ronald Egherman 

Assistant Director, Administration 


PUBLIC IILFOPM'-PICN OFFICE 

Two valuable innovations helped make the year under review a productive 
one for the Public Information Office: 

1, A telephone line v;as installed to give recorded information, updated by 
the Public Information Office, on the Museums' activities in order to lessen 
the load of the regular lines, 

2. Radio station KIBS/KDFC generously offered to broadcast vignettes on the 
Museums* activities. These tv/o- to three- minute programs are now written 
and recorded by volunteer Rosemond Shirinian with the guidance of the Public 
Information Office, 

This year began with intensive efforts on behalf of a major exhibition of 
Egyptian art, Images for Eternity , In addition to extensive coverage in 
Bay Area newspapers and magazines, television interview’s v;ere arranged for 
Mr. Richard Fazzini and Dr, Bernard Bothraer of The Brooklyn Museum, and 
notices in buses helped to keep the exhibition in the public eye. 

Coincidental with the Egyptian exhibition was an exhibition of Precolumbian 
art from the Land Collection, Fire, Earth, Uater , The Public Information 
Office provided not only local publicity services but also cooperated with 
the museums in Honolulu and Seattle to which this exhibition -was circulated. 

In December the Museums' admission charge v;as announced, and it has been the 
subject of many articles and public queries since. 

An exhibition of etchings by Edgar Chahine from the collection of Albert 
Nalbandian received support from Air France, French Bank of California and 
I. Magnin. The Public Information Officer coordinated publicity and certain 
other activities that concerned these sponsors. 

The final phase of the exhibition Three Centuries of French Art on loan from 
the Norton Simon Foimdation and the Norton Simon Inc, Foundation was accorded 
special publicity service by Donald L, Blum, public relations consultant to 
The Museum Society and the Museimis, San Francisco Magazine published a full 
color reproduction of a painting in the exhibition, and there v;as broad 
coverage of the gala opening celebration. 

A major campaign v/as planned to publicize the extraordinary exhibition of 
Master Paintings from the Hermitage and the State Russian Museiim, Leningrad, 

and the special morning hour for groups was quickly oversubscribed. However, 
a strike-induced nine-day closing of the Museums destroyed much of the 
momentum of the campaign, as did halting of special shuttle bus service 
to the Legion of Honor for the duration of the exliibition. 

The major effort of the year under review was on behalf of American Art : 

An Sidiibition from the Collection of Mr, and Mrs, John D, Rockefeller 3rd. 

Widespread notice v/as secured locally, nationally and internationally. 
Articles appeared in many magazines, including Smithsonian Magazine , American 
Art Reviev; , Apollo , Sunset , Ccilifornia Living , Performing Arts , P.G.& E. 
Progress and Antiques , as well as dozens of newspapers. Statement staffers 
were sent to l60,000 customers of the San Francisco Water Dept,, and 400 
transit cards were placed in Bay Area buses, A special undergraduate 
lecturers program on behalf of the exhibition v/as publicized and quickly 
oversubscribed. 


- 4l - 


tvtqp-q^^c;- ^continued) 


The Museum Society’s tri-museum monthly calendar, compiled by the Public 
Information Office, had reached a circulation of more than 20,000 at the 
end of the fiscal year, providing information on a multitude of museum 
activities and events. 

The invaluable volimteer service of Susan Booth in the Public Information 
Office is gratefully ad-mov/ledged. 


Charles D, Long 

Public Information Officer 


- 42 - 


THE I-!USEUrl SOCIETY 


The Musetun Society, as the membership organization serving The Fine Arts 
Museums of San Francisco and The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, continued 
its support daring 1975-76 of a v/ide variety of exhibitions, publications, 
educational programs and other activities. 

The follovnLng Directors seirred as Officers of the Society during 1975-76: 

Chairman: V/illiam Star^ton Picher 
First Vice-Chairman: Mrs. Viilliam H. McIGLeroy 
Second Vice-Chairman: Mrs. Frederick Vhitridge 
Treasurer: Hichard 17. Goss, II 
Secretary: Mrs. Joseph V/, Cochran, III 

Museum Society commil^cee chairmen during 1975-76 included: 

By-Lav/S : Edv/in J, Mejia 

Development: Cliarles L. Griswold (representative to FAM committee) 

Education: Benjamin J, Herhey, Jr, (representative to FAII committee) 

Exhibitions: Mrs. Frederick '/hitridge 

Finance: Richard W, Goss, II 

Membership: John Lov;ell Jones 

Nominating: John R, May 

Personnel: Mrs. William MacColl, Jr. 

Program: Mrs. V/illiam H, McKLeroy 
Publications: Mrs. G, Gordon Beilis 
Shops and Ser''/ices: Mrs. Launce E. Gamble 
Travel: Mrs, William MacColl, Jr, 

At the Society’s Annual Meeting of Members on May 17, 1976, the follov/ing 
v;ere elected as Directors for six-year terras until May 1982; 

George T, Ballou 
Mrs, Bruce Dohrmann 
Gustav Knecht, Jr, 

John F, Merriam 
Mrs, 17, Robert Phillips 
Mrs. Alan Robinson 
Mrs , \7oodrow Wong 

On March 24, 1976 the Board of Directors appointed Jay D. McEvoy and Richard 
Slottow to the Board to fill the unexpired terras of Mrs. Joseph Alioto and 
Robert W, Cahill until May 1977. Charles L, Griswold tendered his resignation 
from the Board in May 1976 because of his occupational transfer to Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. This vacancy vn.ll be filled in the fall of 1976, 


- 43 - 


tIixj IIUSZUT'I oOCUTY (Continued) 

E>diibition Pron^rainiiiinp: 

Tlie Museum Society funded v/liolly or in part the follovdng exhibitions in 
fiscal 1975-76: 

'Hie Ibdiibition of Archaeological Finds of the Peerless Re-public of Cliina 

(partial funding) 

Fire-i:arth-\/ater; Sculpture from the Land Collection of Mesoamerican Art 

Images for EterrJlty: The Art of Ancient Ep:ypt 

Recent Drav/ings by Jose Luis Cuevas 

Robert Cremean Sculpture 

Tliree Centuries of French Art , a re-installation of French paintings lent 

by the Norton Simon Foundations 

Tsutsumu: The Art of the Japanese Package 

Master Paintings from the Hermitage and The State Russian Museum, Leningrad 

American Art; An Exliibition from the Collection of Mr, and Mrs, John D. 

Rockefeller 3rd. 

The Museum Society also funded a variety of programs in connection vd.th the 
follovn.ng e:chibitions; Sculpture from the Land Collection of Mesoamerican Art , 
Images for Sternity , V/omen Artists; Reviei/ and Recognition ; Clayton Bailey ; 
V/onders of the World Museum , and Sam Richardson: Light Line , 

During the Rockefeller exliibition, the Society funded a series of seven 
programs entitled ”An American Sampler; l8th and 19th Century Arts and 
Entertainment,” presented in the de Young Museum auditorium on Saturday 
afternoons and Monday evenings. In addition the Society also funded a 
training seminar in American Art for undergraduates at Mills College and 
UC-Berkeley taught by Professor l/anda Corn, Tlie students were bused to the 
de Young Museum to study the Rockefeller paintings, and a seminar room v;as 
provided for their use. Ten of these students subsequently gave lectures 
on the Rockefeller exhibition to interested groups in the Bay Area. 

Various performing arts programs, films, lectures, publications and events 
for members and the general public were sponsored by the Museum Society, 

A listing of these is foiuid in Appendix ^/II. 

The Museum Societ:;- Auxiliary 


The Auxiliary continued to serve the Society cind the Museums in a variety of 
ways. Auxiliary members handled arrangements for the Family Holiday Party at 
the de Young in December, Mrs, Robert Tnomas and her committee were in charge 
of the Opening Day events for the Rockefeller exhibition. 

The major event sponsored by the Auxiliary this year v/as the Treasure Hunt 
Auction on February 23, held at the Butterfield & Butterfield V/arehouse, 
which raised nearly $60,C00, A fund-raising Members* Preview took place 
on Febrniary 25, vn.th advance shov/ing of the auction items at the V/arehouse 
on the folloid.ng two days. 


- 4 ^ - 


THE MUSEUI-I SOCIETY (Contirmed) 
Bay Area Grar>hic Arts Council 


In April a nine-member CoiTimittee of Governors was formed to administer the 
Bay Area Graphic Arts Council, v/ith George A, Poole, Jr. serving as President. 
New BAGAC by-laws were drav/n up and the dues structure revised to include a 
^JlO General membership, in addition to the 5^50 and 4^150 categories. 

Docent Council and Volunteer Council 

The Museum Society continued to serve as the financial guarantor of the 
Docent Council and to administer its accounts. The Society also funded the 
position of Coordinator of the Volunteer Coimcil. The activities of these 
tv/o Councils are reported under "Docent Council" and "Pi'ogram Office." 


- ^3 - 




ACHENBACH FOTOIDATION 


APPE^IDIX I 


Gift Acquisitions: Prints 


THE APOLLO STOPY by Robert T. McCall, American, 1919- . Suite of 5 Lithographs 

Gift of Byron Butler, M, D,, Phoenix, Arizona 
WAXENSTEIN by Marsden Hartley, American, l877-19^3. Lithograph 
JEl/ELRY by John Taylor Arms, American, 1887-1953. Etching E, 321. 

VEPIIONT or GOD^S COUNTRY by John Taylor Arms, American, 1887-1953. Etching E395 
Gift of Mr, and Mrs, Joseph M, Bransten, San Francisco 
THE COAL WAGON by Theodore Gericault, French, 1791-1824. l821. Lithograph D36 
Gift of Mrs, Alexander de Bretteville, San Francisco 
42 Etchings and Drypoints by Julian Alden \7eir, American, 1852-1919. 

10 Etchings and a letter by Caro Weir Ely, Daughter of above. 

C.H, , Self Portrait by Childe Hassam, 1859-1935. 1920, Etching, C, 155 
Gift of Mrs, Katherine Caldv;ell, Berkeley, California 
DAHSEUSE AUX CYTIBALES by \7alter Crane, English, 1843-1915. Lithograph. 1894. 
BEHSDICTIME LIQUEUR by Alphonse Mucha. Czech, l860-1939. Color Lithograph Poster 
Gift of Mrs. Annette Carlson, San Francisco 
27 Etchings by Bernard Childs, American, Contemporary, 1910- . 

Gift of Bernard Childs, Nev/ York City for Mrs. Marjorie Gianelloni, S.F. 
HE’ILA CHIAN. .LI.,LIa ,LI by Honore Daumier, French, l8o8-l879» Litho, D.l87/ii. 
DOMINO ; by Heonore Daumier, Lithograph, 1839. D, 563/iii. 

Gift of Mr. and Mrs, Lee Ettelson, San Francisco 
77 Color Etchings by Bernard Childs to complete gift of complete v;orks. 

Gift of Mrs. Marjorie Gianelloni, San Francisco 
SELBSTBILPr'IIS MIT GATTIN (Self-Portrait v/ith V/ife) by Lovis Corinth, 

German, 1858-1923. 1904, Drypoint, 

V/OODED LANDSCAPE V.iTTH TWO CARTS AND FIGUPi;S by Thomas Gainsborough, English, 
1727 - 1788 , 1779/So, Soft Ground Etching, ^Hayes 9. 

M AY GREFII by Graham Sutherland, English, 1903- . 1927. Etching. 1942. 

GJERCINO«S TURBAN COMING OVER COROT >3 CLEARING by Joseph Goldyne. Color Etching, 
Gift of Dr, and Mrs. Joseph Goldyne, San Francisco 
PERVERSE IMAGE OF CHRIST by Jesse Allen, American, Contemp. Color Lithograph. 

Gift of Dr, Robert Haskell, San Rafael, Ca, 

TUSCUS by Hendrik Goltzius, Dutch, 1558-1617. 1598, Engraving. H. 334/ii, 

VON EINEI'4 SORGFAXTIGEN STER3ENDEN MENS CHEN . Woodcut by Hans I7eiditz 
V ON DIEBSTALEN . l/oodcut by Hans I7eiditz, German, FI. 1497-1510. 

VON STAJRICS UND GRCSSMUTIGmT DES SOHNE , Woodcut by Hans V/eiditz 
VON TRirJKGESCHIPJ^, MIT EDLEN STElNH-i GEZIERT , V/oodcut by Hans V7eiditz 
3^ other 17oodcuts from same series. 

ST. PAUL PREACHING TO THE EPHESITLNS (After LeSeur) by Nicolas-Henri Tardieu, 
French, 1674-1749. 

UNTITLED LANDSCAPE by Anthonie V/aterlo, Dutch, I609-I69O, Etching, D.265 

CHRIST BEFORE CAIAPHAS by Marc Antonio Raimondi, Italian, l480-1530. l/oodcut 
DESCENT FROM THE CROSS by Marc Antonio Raimondi, Woodcut. D, 276 

11 Anonymous l6th Century German 17oodcut Prints, 

Gift of Mr. and Mrs, Julius Landauer, San Francisco 


- 46 - 


APPH'IDIX 1-2 


ACICI^njACH FOUI^DATIOn GIFT ACQUISITIONS ; PRIIITS (Continued) 


SELF PORTRAIT by Max Klinger. German, 1857-1920. Aquatint. 

ETCHINGS OF PAPIS , Title Page, by Charles Meryon. French, 1821 -l868. Etching. 
POPTPAIT OF ANDPE DEPAIN by L. Albert-Lasard. French, 189I- . Lithograph. 

POPvTPAIT OF SIP raATICIS DRAKE . Anonymous. Knglish. Engraving. 

Gift of Mr, and Mrs, P, E, Levd-S, San Rafael, Ca, 

MOUMT TAMALPAIS . 1937. V/oodcut by George Demont Otis. American, 1879-1962. 
IMDIAiM HOUSE 1938, Drypoint by George Demont Otis. 

Gift of Miss Vera Michels, Greenbrae, Ca, 

FOUR SEASONS by Marc Cliagall. Russian, 1887- . Color Lithograph Poster. 197^. 

Gift of George A, Poole, Jr., San Francisco. 

CHEVAL , Lino-Engraving. 19^9. by Emile Lahner, Hungarian, I893- 
ESPACE . Monotype, 1970, by Emile Lahner. 

F0R?-IS EN ESPACS . 1970, Monotype, by Lahner. 

COMPOTIER . 1961. Lithograph, by Lahner. 

MOUVE'SHT ELECTRON AUTOUR DU NOYAU , Color Litho. by Lahner. 

STUDY FOR A STAIrlED GLASS VJir-IDOV/ . 1950 Maxed Media by Lahner. 

Gift of Cmdr. and Mrs, Richard Rodriguez, Monterey, Ca, 

MOUSE TRAPPED . I969. Color Etching by Elizabeth Sher. American, 19^3- • 

PIZZA . 1966, Color Etching by Elizabeth Sher 
AI'IGEL V/ING . 197^. Color Etch-ing by Elizabeth Sher, 

Gift of Elizabeth Sher, Berkeley, Ca. 

GEI'IEVA SERIES . 197^. Set of 7 Lithographs by Lemrniy. Malaysian-:b!ierican, 19^K>- 
Gift of Mr, and Mrs. Edgar Sinton, Hillsborough, Ca. 

LITTLE POPPIES . 1976, Color Aquatint by Beth Van Hoesen. American, 1926- 
TTilTE IRIS , 1976, Color Aquatint by Beth Van Hoesen. 

Gift of Smith-Anderson Gallery and Beth Van Hoesen, San Francisco, 

12 Portraits (Lithographs) of English Literary Figures of Early 20th century 
by Walter 'Tittle, American, 1883-1966, 

Gift of Mrs, V.?alter Tittle, Carmel, Ca, 

Purchase Acquisitions: Draj.vings 


l’ ARTISTE C0I^L7EP.5ATIT . Sanguine Drax-d-ng on paper by Jean Honore Fragonard, 
French, 1732-l8c6, 

Purchased from Jean Cailleinc, Paris, France. 

LITTLE LEAPIiM V/atercolor on Paper by Gladys Nilsson, American, 1927- 1969. 

Purchased from Robert Aichele, Carmichael, Ca, 

STAJTDING ARAB . Graphite on Paper by Jean-Leon Gerome. French. l82A-1904, 
Purchased from Shepherd Gallery Associates, Nev; York City, 

I-LARIA BARTOLINI, Pencil Dravn.ng on paper by Jean-Auguste-Dorairiique Ingres. 
French, I78C-I067, 

Purchased by Mildenstein & Company, Nev; York City, 


- ^7 - 


APPEI'IDEC 1-3 


ACIiETBACH FOUNDATION (Continued) 


Purchase Acquisitions ; Prints 


Untitled. Seriagraph, Stencil by Joseph Cornell. American, 1903-1972. 

Purchased from Brooke Alexander, Inc,, Nev; York City 
INVOCATION A LA MADONE D’CIFYK WRT . l897. Color Lithograph by Marcel Lenoir. 
French, 1872-1931. 

AU SQUARE . 1897* Color Lithograph by J.J.E. Evenpoel. Belgian, 1872-1899 • 

DAI'IS LES EOMGES . 1898. Color Lithograph by Henri Betouche. French. 183^-1913. 

Purchased from L*Estampe Originale, Los Gatos, Ca. 

'lAI^IE FLQV/ERG . Lithograph, hand colored by Grant V/ood. American, 1892-19^2. 

Purchased from Victoria Blythe, Los Angeles, Ca. 

Untitled, ca, 19^4-, Etchinb by Jackson Pollock, American, 1912-1956. 

MAPIE5 . Color Aquatint by Jacques Villon, French, 1875-1963* 

Purchased from Graphics International, Ltd,, V/ashington, D.C. 

L’ ASSOUTE . 189^. V/oodcut by Felix Vallotton. Si'm-Ss/Fr ench , 1865-1925* 

CPUCIFIXION . 189^. V/oodcut by Emile Bernard, French, 1368-19^1 o 

Purchased by Joseph Gropper Gallery, V/est Somer'/ille, Mass. 

TAI'IALES , 1975. Color Aquatint by V/illiam Allan, American, 1936- 

Purchased from Hansen-Fuller Gallery, San Francisco, Ca, 

BEAPDED OLD MAN . Etching, DeV, 139? by Domenico Tiepolo, Italian, 1727-lSo4 
V/CMAN BEFOPJ] A TABLE . Color Woodcut, by Yasuo Kuniyoshi, American, 1890-1953* 
SATIPE ON THE LAOCCON IN THE BEL^/EDSPE . 15^5* l/oodcut after Titian. Pass. 97, 
by Niccolo Boldrini. Italian, ca, 1510-1566. 

VEPY HUMBp, VERY SL^ICSSIVE, VEPY OBEDIEI/T, Ar/D ABO^/E ALL VEPY GPESDY SUBJECTS. _ 

Litho. D,/fO/i by Honore Daumier. French, l8c8-lS73* 

THE PEPOSS OF FRANCE . Lithograph, D, 84, Daumier, 

A LARGE MORTAR WITH A SHORT PjlNGE . D. 98. Litho. Daumier. 

THE PHA.NT0M . Lithograph, D, 115/ii . Daumi er , 

Purchased by R,S. Levri.s, Inc,, Nicasio, Ca. 

RESURRECTION , 1926, Mono type- Aqua tint, P. 21 by Arthur E. Da-'/ies, 

American, 1862-1928, 

WTLDFLOWERS . Hand colored Lithograph by Grant 'Wood, American, 1892-1942. 

Purchased from Middendorf Gallery, 'Washington, D. C. 

24 Orange Crate Labels (Lithographed in color). 

Purchased from Old Promises Co,, San Francisco 
Untitled Dry embossed etching by George looker. American, 1920- , 1975* 

Purchased from Frank Rehn Gallery, Nevv York City 
DAY LILLIES . 1973* Etching, A.quatint by Peter i^ilton, American, 1930- . 

THE JOLLY CORNER , (by Henry James) Illustr., v/ith 21 etchings in portfolio, 

1971, By Peter 1111 ton. 

Purchased from Tomlinson Collection, Baltimore, Maryland, 


- 48 - 


APPENDIX I - if 


ACHIDrBACH FOUT®ATION (Continued) 


Gift Acquisitions; Dravn.n,?s 


Untitled Dravving, Pencil, beeswax, graphite on paper by Katherine Porter, 
American, 19^1- , 

Sheet of Studies. Recto/verso. Inlc on paper by Theodore Matthias von Holst. 
English, I8l0-l84if. 

Gift of Mrs, Alexander de Bretteville, San Francisco , 

STREET SCENE . Pencil Dravri.ng, School of Bonington, English, 19th C, 

Gift of Graphics International, Ltd., l/ashington, D, C. 

Plan Draid.ng for the Etching, MAY GREEN , 1927. IrHc, graphite, gouache, on paper. 
By Graliam Sutherland, English, 1903- • 

Gift of Dr, and Mrs, Joseph Goldyne, San Francisco « 

Untitled Standing Male Figure. l8l6. Black Chalk, V/hite Chalk on Paper. 

By Eugene Delacroix. French, 1798-1863. 

Gift of Mr, Austin Hills, San Francisco 
Academic Study. Elderly Male Nude, Charcoal on Paper, By Albert Horstmeier, 
American, 1869-19^, 

Gift of Mr. and Mrs, Robert Flynn Johnson, San Francisco 
T'.JO CAVALRYMEl^I, V/atercolor, by Constantin Guys, French, l802-l892. 

Gift of Mr. V/illiam S. Picher, San Francisco 
Abstract Heads, V/atercolor, By Alfred Maurer, American, l868- , 

Gift of Bertha Schaefer Gallery, Inc., Kev; York City 

Gifts to the Achenbach Library 
4 Books for the Theatre and Dance Collection. 

ISADORA DUI'TCAN by Arnold Genthe 

PORTFOLIO OF DANCE by Grandjouan 

THE DANCE OF ISADORA DUNCAN by Valentine Le Corate 

ECRITS SUR LA DAI'ISE by Isadora Duncan 

Gift of Mr. George H. Cabaniss, Jr., San Francisco 
EAPIY E?/GLISH V/ATERCOLORS by lolo Williams 

Gift of Mr. Ernest Heinzer, San Francisco 
AI'-IERICA by Ralph Steadman. 

Gift of Rolling Stone Magazine, San Francisco 
One Step Stool for the Library, 

Gift of Mrs, Damon Raike, San Francisco 


Total De-Accessions: 1973-1976 


Thomas Hart Benton: 
Maximilian Kurzweil: 
Rembrandt van Rijn: 
Georg Penoz: 

Edouard Manet: 


l6 Lithographs (Exchanges) 

1 V/oodcut. (Duplicate) 

1 Drypoint Etching, H. 172, Late Impression, 

1 Engraving, B. 90. (Duplicate) 

2 Etchings, G, l6/v 8c G. 26/ii. (Duplicates) 


- 49 - 


APPSITDIX 1-5 

ITEIIS HiyMDLED BY THE 
ACT-IEJ'-IBACH FOUInTDATION (Continued) 



Loans TO the Achenbach Foundation 

Feb. 25, 1975 to 
Aug. 6, 1975: 

I Framed Toulouse-Lautrec Print lent for examination 
by Mrs, Michele Frosini, Berkeley, Ca. 

Mar. 1, 1975 to 

Aug. 14, 1975: 

1 Benjamin I7est Sketchbook lent for authentication 
examination by Mr. Ed Nagel, San Francisco 

Apr. 18, 1975 to 
Nov. 20, 1975: 

1 Rembrandt Print lent by Mr. & Mrs, John V/inkler, 

El Cerrito, Ca. 

June 1, 1975 to 

Aug. 25, 1975: 

Lent for Auguste Rodin E:diibition: 

2 Drypoints, 2 Drav;ings by Rodin from The Art Institute 
of Cliicago 

5 Drypoints by Rodin from Baltimore Museum of Art 

5 Drypoints by Rodin from Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

1 Drypoint by Rodin from Mr, 8: Mrs, Lavnrence Bmmswick, 
Rydal, Pa. 

1 Drypoint by Rodin from Cleveland Museum of Art 

1 Book, illustrated by Rodin from Houghton Library, 
Harvard University 

1 Drypoint by Rodin lent by R,M, Light 8: Co,, Boston 

4 Books illustrated by Rodin lent by N,Y, Public Library 

1 Dravri.ng by Rodin lent by Museum* of Art, Stanford 

1 Book illustrated by Rodin lent by Bancroft Library, 
University of California, Berkeley 

1 Bronze bust of Victor Hugo lent by Baltimore (Maryland) 
Museum of Art 

1 Ceramic Plaque, 2 Bronze busts b;f Rodin lent by Museum 
of Art, Stanford University 

38 Dravjings and 7 Drypoints by Rodin lent by Musee Rodin, 
Paris, France 

1 Drypoint by Rodin lent by Ximsthalle, Bremen, '.■,G, 

June k, 1975 to 
Sept. 15, 1975 

3 Drav/ings lent by Mrs, Bruce Kelliam, San Francisco 
for examir*ation. 

June 25, 1975 to 
Aug. 27, 1975: 

6 Serigraph Prints lent by Hr. L.C. Kolav/ole, San Fran- 
cisco for Examination, potential purchase. 

July 17, 1975 to 
Jiay 6, 1976: 

10 Monotype prints lent by Sandria Hu, Houston, Texas, 
for examination, potential exliibition 


- 50 - 


APPSI'IDIX 1-6 



Loans TO Achenbach Foundation (Continued) 

Aug. 6, 1975 to 
Sept. 30, 1975: 

82 Pen and I7ash Dra\imigs lent by Jose Luis Cuevas, Mexico 
City, for exhibition 

Oct, 1, 1975 to 
Dec. 20, 1975: 

100 Line Dravvlngs lent by Eleanor Dickinson, San Francisco 
for Exhibition. 

Dec. 10, 1975 to 
Mar. 20, 1976: 

16 Prints lent by a San Francisco collector for Artist’s 
Portraits exhibition. 

Dec. 15, 1975 to 
Mar. 10, 1976: 

90 Framed Prints lent by Mr. Albert Nalbandian, San Fran- 
cisco, for Edgar Chahine Exliibition 

Mar. 26, 1976 to 
Mar. 29, 1976: 

1 Rowlandson 1/ater Color Drai^ng lent by Mr. John V/ilson, 
Lalceside, Michigan, for potential purchase. 

May 8, 1976 to 

5 V/ater color landscapes by Ryder, Hassara and Weir, 


Indefinite long loan Lent by Mrs. Katherine Caldx\reli, Berkeley, Ca, 


May 15, 1976 to 
July 30 , 1976 : 

25 Pen and Ink Dravn.ngs lent by Mr. Gordon Baldid-n, 
Bolinas, Ca, for Exhibition. 


1973-1976 Fiscal Year Loans to A«F.G.A,: 27 Sources lent 4o8 Items, 



Loans FROM Achenbach Foundation 

Apr, 7, 1975 to 
Oct, 2, 1975: 

2 Drav/ings, by Fragonard and Watteau, lent to The Art 
Institute of Cliicago (Illinois) 

Aug. 12, 1975 to 
Dec, 4, 1975: 

3 Drav/ings by Maxfield Parrish, lent to Seibu Galleries, 
Tokyo , Japan 

Aug. 20, 1975 to 
Dec. 12, 1975: 

2 (1 Print & 1 Watercolor) by J.M.’Z. Turner, lent to 
University of California, Berkeley 

Nov. 24, 1975 to 
Apr. 19, 1976 : 

8 Dra\d.ngs, by Boucher, Gainsborough, Huet, Norland, 

Sandby, Baumgartner, Rowlandson and Vincent, lent to 
Claremont Colleges, Pomona, Ca, and to the E.B, Crocker 

Art Gallery, Sacramento, Ca, 

Oct. 9, 1975 to 
Dec. 18 , 1975: 

2 Dra\d.ngs by Giovanni Battista Paggi, lent to E.B. 

Crocker Art Gallery, Sacramento, Ca, 


- 51 - 


APPETTDIX 1-7 



Loans FHCM Aclienbach. Foundation (Continued) 

Dec. 2 , 1975 to 
Feb. 26 , 1976 : 

28 Moodcut Prints by Barlach, Becknan, Blake, Baldung, 
Burgknair, Campendonk, Gauguin, Graf, Heckel & riolde, 
lent to Portland (Oregon) Art Museum 

Dec. 3 , 1975 to 
Jan, 15 , 1976 : 

1 Print by Joseph Goldyne, lent to Mev/port (Beach, Ca.) 

Art Center 

Jan. 15 , 1976 to 
Mar. 16, 1976: 

65 Framed Color Drav.Hngs of Theatre and Ballet Scenes, from 
the Spreckels Theatre and Dance Collection, lent to The 
Society of the Four :\rts. Palm Beach, Florida 

Jan. 30, 1976 to 
Apr. 30, 1976 

7 Framed Photographs by Arnold Gen the, lent to Oakland 
(California) Art Museum 

Mar. 16, 1976 to 
June 23, 1976: 

6 Framed Dravr’ ngs by Jusepne de Ribera and G'i ox'-anrn. 

Ba.ttista Tiepolo, lent to Los Angeles (Califoricia) County 
Museum of Art 

May 3 , 1976 to 

July 2 , 1976: 

21 Viev; Prints by Arms, Fraser, Hiroshige, Perrot, 

Piranesi and Roberts, lent to Transamerica Corporation, 

San Francisco, for Exhibition. 

June 1 , 1976 to 
Apr. 17, 1977 

1 Dravang by Georgia O’Keeffe, lent to American Federation 
of Arts, Mev; York City 

June 15, 1976 to 
Aug. 31 , 1976 : 

2 Prints by Koshiro Onclii, lent to the Rational Museun of 
Modern art, ToIq'o, Japan 


- 52 - 


^yPPEIIDIX II 


RECAPITULATION OF ITEIIS HANDLED BY THE REGISTRAR *S OFFICE - M. H. DE YOUTIG 

NSI-IORIAL MUSEUM - FIUCAL YEvlR 1975-1976 


Gifts to Museum 64o 
Extended Loans to Museum l62 
Extended Loans to Museum Returned 128 
Temporary Exhibition Loans to Museum 2,211 
Temporary Exliibition Loans to Museum Returned 1,906 
Loans by Museum to Other Institutions 3j728 
Loans by Museum to Other Institutions Returned 4o6 
Permanent Collection Items to Outside Conservators 1 
Permanent Collection Items to Outside Conservators Returned 3 
Inter-Departmental Transfers - to Others l66 
Inter-DepartmentaL Transfers - from Others 89 
Transfer of Permanent Collection Items to Asian Art Museum 8l3 


Total number of routine objects received, processed, delivered, 

etc,, during the 1975-1976 period: 10,255 


PSRI-IAI'IENT COLLECTIONS ITSI---LS SENT OUTfilDE DE YOUNG MUSSUI^ FOR CONSERVATION 

47.12 I3IS ^ Egyptian, v;ood and bronze sculpture To: Conservation Department 

Asian Art Museiim, S.F. 11/20/75 

RETURN OF PERMANENT COLLECTION ITSI-IS SEI^IT OUTSIDE FOR CONSERVATION 


4712 IBIS 


From: Conservation Department 
Asian Art Museum. 12/1/75 


49835 MAPvIUS AI-IIDST THE RUINS OF CARTHAGE 
Oil/can by John Vanderlyn 


From: Conservation Department 
San Francisco Museum of Modern 
Art, San Francisco. 2/26/76 


53670 PORTRAIT OF ELDERLY LADY 
Cil/can by Bronzino 


From: Conservation Department 
Los Angeles Coimty Museum of 
Art, 6/24/76 


INTER-DEPARTI'-ISNTAL TRANSFERS AND RECEIPTS 


Permanent Collection Items transferred to Legion of Honor 1C3 

Permanent Collection Items sent to Painting Conservation, Legion of Honor 50 

Permanent Collection Items loaned to Docent Council ^ 

166 

Permanent Collection Items Received from Legion of Honor 80 

Permanent Collection Items Returned from Painting Conservation, Legion 9 




- 53 - 


APPENDIX II - 2 


ADDITIONS TO THE COLLECTIONS OF THE M. H. DE YOUNG IIEMORIAL MUSEUM, 1975--1976 


75.12 (A,B) 

75.13 

75.14 


75.15 

75.16 

75.17.1 

75.17.2 

75.18.1 

75.18.2 

75.18.3 

75.18.4 
75.18.3 

75.18.6 

75.18.7 

75.18.8 

75.18.9 

75. 18.10 

75.18.11 

75.18.12 

75.18.13 

75.18.14 
75.18,13 

75.18.16 

75.18.17 

75.18.18 

75.18. 19 

75.18.20 

75.18.21 

75 . 18.22 
75 . 18 . 23-26 

75 . 18.27 

75 . 18.28 

75 . 18.29 
75 . 18 . 30-31 

75.18.32 

75.18.33 

75.18.34 

75.18.35 


STERLING SILVER TUREEN V//COVEP , English (London), 1778-1779 
Gift of Mrs. John Lord King 
BLACK PAINTED V/OOD SIDE CHAIN , American, ca. 1720 
Gift of Mr, Granville L, Rogers 
" SMILING HEAD ", pre-Coliunbian ceramic from Veracruz 

Gift of Mr, Charles B, Cohn and Mr. Stuart P, Anderson 
in memory of Mr, Roland E. Partridge 
GRANARY DOOR , Dogon, Africa 

Gift (Museum Foundation) by Dr. 8c Mrs. Melvin Silverman 
V/INGED ANIMAL./BIRD STAFF , Senufo, Ivory Coast, Africa 
Gift of Mr, 8c Mrs, Herbert Balcer 
MALE ANCESTOR FIGURE , Baluba, Africa 
MALE ANCESTOR FIGURE . Baluba, Africa 

Gift (Museum Foundation) of Mrs. Vicci Sperry 
DOGE^S PALACE , oil/can by Luca Carlevaris 
SAN GIORGIO HAGGIORE , oil/can by Luca Carlevaris 
ASSEI4BLEE GAL ANTE , oil/can by Jean B, J, Pater 
PORTRAIT OF BEARDED MAN , oilAood attrib to Corneille de Lyon 
MADOMA AND CHRIST CHILD , oil/can by A. Isenbrandt 
MAJDONI'JA AliP CHILD , oil/wood by Martin Schongauer 
PORTRAIT OF M^IN IN BLACK , oil/wood by Jos van Cleve Flemalle 

PORTRAIT OF MAiN IN BLACK HAT 8c RED JACKET , oil/wood by Master of / 
SEATED MAN IN LAI'IDSCAPE , oil/can by Francisco Goya 
SEATED V/OMAN IN LAiySCAPE , oil/can by Francisco Goya 
SELF~PORTPAIT , oil/can by Jean Baptiste Greuze 

VJOMEN DISEIiBARKING FROM SHIP , oil/can by Unknoim of Flemish School 

AGE OF INI'IOCENCE (COPY) , oil/can by Sir Joshua Reynolds 

PORTRAIT OF MASTER THOMHILL , oil/can by Sir Tliomas La^^^^ence 

THE GECGPuAPHER , oil/v/ood by Jan Vermeer of Delft 

MARCHIONESS OF ELY , oil/can by Sir Thomas Lawrence 

LA RSSISTAI'ICE IITJTILE . oil/wood by J. H. Fragonard 

SEATED WOMAN V/ITH HARP AND DCG , oil/v/ood by J. E, Schall 

LAITDSCAPE , oil/can by Charles Fran(?ois Daubigny 

XVIIc V/ILLIAM 8c MARY STYLE SETTEE V/ALEI-IISH TAPESTRY COVSPJNG 

QUEEI-'I miE /ENGLISH) V/ALIfuT V/ING ARMCHAIR 

GEORGE II V/ING ARI-ICHAIR, ENGLISH 

SET OF FOUR GHAPLES II CAR^/ED l/ALNUT SIDECHAIRS W/RED VELVET 

CHARLES II CARVED WALIRJT OPEN APJ4CHAIR 

CHARLES II CARVED V/ALNUT STOOL 

QUEEI'I ANNE V/ALNUT STOOL 

PAIR JACOBEAN OAK JOINT STOOLS 

MARQUETRY CCMiODE , FRENCH (LOUIS XV-SVI) 

MARQUETRY TABLE EN CHIFFONIER , FRENCH (LOUIS XV-’.ETl) 

MARQUETRY l/RITIMG T/ELE , FREI'iCH (LOUIS XV) 

FPENCH RENAISSANCE CARVED WALNUT CABINET A DEUX CORPS 


- 34 - 


APPEriDIX II - 3 


ADDITIONS - DE YOUNG MUSSUIl (Continued) 


75.18.36 JACOBEAN CARl'ED AND INLAID OAIC CUPBOAED 

75 . 18 . 37 (A,B) pair OF ITALIAN LOUIS XV STYLE INLAID V/ALITOT SMALL SIDE TABLES 
75.18.38 GEORGE II CARVED AND GILDED MIRROR , ENGLISH 

75.18,39-^ LOUIS r/I CARVED AI-JD PAINTED FAUTEUIL (PAPJS) 

75 . 18.41 DIRECTOIRE TUB BACK BERGERE , FREI^ICH 

75 . 18 . 42 LOUIS XVI SMALL & CANED DESK aiAIR (REVOLVING) 

75.18.43 LOUIS XVI MAHOGANY BUREAU PLAT , signed F, Rubestuck 

75.18.44 LOUIS X^/I PARQUETRY BONHEUR DU JOUR , signed J. L. Cosson 

75.18.45 LOUIS XV PROVINCIAL SMALL TABLE 

75.18 . 46 QUBHJ A^TIE V/ALMT DRESSING TABLE 

75.18.47 QU^N ANNE V/ALI'IUT ICERROR (w pcs^ 

75 . 18 . 48 SAI’-iSON SLAYING A PHILISTINE , bronze, Giowani Bologna (after) 

75.18.49 RAPE OF IHE SABINES , bronze on marble base, G, Bologna (after) 

75.18.50 GANITIEDE, bronze on ebony base, B, Cellini (after) 

75 . 18 . 51 (A,B) bronze mortar V//PESTLE , ITALIAN XVIc, 

75.18.52 BRONZE MORTAR . X^/IcTTiTALIAN or FRENCH) 

75 . 18 , 53 (A,B) PAIR V.ROUGHT IRON TORCHERES , ITALIAN, XVIc 

75.18.54 MAJOLICA LUSTRE DEEP PLATE , ITALIAN (Deruta ware) 

75.18.55 MAJOLICA PILGRIM’S FLASK . ITALIAN 

75.18, 56 (A,B) pair ViROUGHT IRON A^ID BRASS TORCHERES , ITALIAIT, SVIIc. 

75.18,57 FOUR EMBROIDERED ORPKREY PANELB , ITALIAI^I, OTc 

(A,B,C,D) 

75.18. 58 (A,B) pair of brass PRICKET CAI^IDLESTICKS , FIH'IISH, TJlc, 

75.18.59 FRAGMENTARY CARVED LIMESTONE BUST OF A BEARDED SAIIEP , FRENCH, XIVc. 
(w/antique crimson velvet covered stand) 

75.18.60 CROUCHING NYMPH & STEEPING AI-IOR , terra cotta maquette, FRENCH, 
XVIIIc, (in carved and gilded vi trine case i-z/lift top) 

75. 18. 61 ( A, B) PAIR BRONZE DOPE FIGURES (OF AN Al'iOR HOLDING A GARLAIIDED MIRROR, 

ON ROGI^ERY BASE, after John Baptiste Pigalle, (LOUIS XVT) 
75 . 18 . 62 (A,B) PAIR OF BRONZE CHEI'IETS , FRENCH, LOUIS :{VI 
75.18.63 BRONZE DOPE & STATU /\RY MANTEL CLOCK , FRENCH, LOUIS XVI 

75 . 18 . 64 (A,B) PAIR BRONZE PORE FIGURAL CANDLES 'EE CKS , FPuENCH, LOUIS TJl 
75.18. 65 (A,B) PAIR DIRECTOIRE BRONZE PORE CHSNETS , FRENCH 

75 . 18 . 66(A,B) PAIR OF DIRECTOIRE BRONZE PORE AI^TD MARBLE CANDLESTICKS , FRENCH 

75 . 18 . 67 (A,B) pair OF DIPIiCTOIRE BP.ONZE PORE SMALL V/ALL LIGHTS , FRENCH 

75.18.68 BRONZE PORE COLUI-INAR SMALL BOUIILOTTE LAI-iP , FRENCH 

75.18.69 DIRECTOIRE BRONZE PORE CHANDELIER , FRENCH 

75.18.70 FRAGMENT HEA.D OF FORTUNA , terra cotta, Roman, lie. A.D, 

75.18.71 GPLTN GLASS JAR , ROMAN IIIc. A.D, 

75.18.72 CLEAR GLASS BOTTLE , ROMAN, ca, II-IIIc. A.D. 

75.18.73 CL EAR GU.SZ BOTTLE , ROMAiN, ca. II-HIc. A.D. 

75.18.74 CLEAR GL.^ 3 S BOTTLE , ROMAN, ca. IIIc, A.D, 

75.18.75 GLASS BRACELET , ROMAN 

75.18.76 CLEAR GLASS BOTTLE , ROI 4 Al^, ca. II-HIc. A.D. 

75.18. 77(A,B) PAIR ROCKINGHAIvl GicEEN & GOLD PORCELAIN JAPJINERES , ENGLISH, C.183O 

75.18.78 CHASSE, GILDED BRONZE AND CHAl-iPLEVE ENAI^IEL, FRKNCH, XIII c, Lr-ICGES 

75.18.79 OVAL PLATTER , PAINTED ENAMEL, FRENCH, Jean Limousin, I528-I6IO 

75.18.80 PORTP.AIT OF CHARLES DE BOURBON CONI^IETABLE DE FPJ^NCE , L. Limousin 


- 55 - 


APPEMDIX II - 4 


ADDITIONS - DE YOUT'IG MUSEUM (Continued) 


755. 18.81 AEORATION OF THE IMPMIT CHPIST , ENj\IffiL, attrib to Monvaerni , LI14CGSS 

75 . 18.82 AETIEAS AV/APDS THE PRIZES TO HIS CAPTAINS, Master of the Aernearide 

75 . 18.83 ASCANIUS ICTLLS I^IUIvIARIUS BEFORE 'TROY , Master of Aernearide Limoges 

75. 18 . 84 TI-EE ENTOMBMEI-iT , ENAIEEL PLAQUE, Leonard Limousin, Limoges , 1505-1577 

75 . 18.85 THE INCREDULITY , ENAl-'IEL PLAQUE, Leonard Limousin, Limoges 

75 . 18.86 SAINT JOHN , PAINTED ENAMEL PLAQUE, Suzanne de Court, Limoges, X^/Ic. 

75 . 18.87 SCENES FROM LIFE OF CFPIST , SNAITEL TRIPTYCH, Nardon Per icaud, Limoges 
(a,b, c) 

75 . 18.88 FAiMILLE VERTE PORCELAIN VASE , CHINESE, KLANG HSI 

75 . 18.89 FAI-IILLS VERTE PORCELAIN VASE , CHINESE, K*AI^IG HSI 

75. 18 . SO SAI'TG DE 3CEUF PORCELAIN VASE, CHINESE, CH’ISN LUI'IG 

75 . 18.91 UNDERGLA.ZE RED DECORATED PORCELAIN VASE, CHIJIESE, CHPIEN LUNG 

75 . 18.92 3 COLOR G-I,aZED bisque PORCELAIN FIGURE OF KV/AN YIN , K*AiNG HSI 

75 . 18.95 3 COLOR GLAZED BISQUE PORCELMN OF A lv4lRRI0R , K^Al'IG HSI 

75 . 18.94 CATC/ED JADE (GREENISH GREY MOTTLED V// 3 R 0 V/I^I) INCENSE BURIffiR , CHIIIESE 

75. 180 95 C.ARVED JADE (PATE GREEN W/BROV/N) OVAL VESSEL , CHINESE 

75.18.S6(A,B) PAIR OF GOLD LACQUERED BRONZE FIGURES (LAMPS), CH'IEN LUI'IG 

75 . 18.97 BLUE AI'ID l.TIITS PORCELAIN VASE , YUNG CHENG 

75 . 18.98 FAIELLE VERTE PORCELAIN CHARGER , K»ANG HSI 

75 . 18.99 CHINESE EXPORT POR.CEIVTN SOUT TUREEN, CO^/ER A-NT) PLATTER 

(a,b,c) “ 

75.18.1C0(A,B) pair of TURQUOISE BLUE GLAZED BISCpE PORCELAIN PARROTS , K»ANG HSI 
75 . 18 . 101(A,B) PAIR OF MOTTLED PALE GREEN JADE CRANES (LA^■pS), CHINESE 

75 . 18.102 GPvEY AND BROVJN AGATE SIRUFF BOTTLE W/GREEN STONE STOPPER , CHII'IESS 

75 . 18.103 C;U-PHOR NHITS PEEING GLASS SNUFF BOTTLE V//GREEN OVERLAY, CHINESE 


75.19 

75.20.1 

75 . 20.2 


75.21.1 

75.21.2 

75.21.3 

75.21.4 

75.21.5 


75.22 


75.24.1 

75.24.2 

75.24.3 

75.24.4 
75.24.3 

75.24.6 
(a,b,c) 

75.24.7 
(A,B,C,D) 


Estate of Rose (Mrs. John) Magnin 

GAi'IE TABLE , AI'ISRICAN, ca, I 83 O 

Gift of Mrs. J, Alden Converse 
QUETAR ST/JIDING M AN, COSTA RICA, Volcanic stone 
QUETAR SITTING MAN . COSTA RICA, Volcanic stone 
Gift of Ms. Martha H. Kelly 
LZGA M'lGINGA TYPE J'LTJS FIGURE , Ivory 
LSGA LmCJAKONGO TYPE IL4SK , Ivory 
LEGA M'lGINGA TYPE FIGURE , Ivory 
LEC-A ILU'IGH-IA TfPE FIGURE V//POINT , Ivory 
LEGA KALUITL.I SPOON FIGURE , Ivory 

Gift of Mr, & Mrs, Marc A, Franklin 
SOFA V//HOPGEHAIR COVERING , Ai^'IERICAN (NEW YORK), ca I 83 O 
Gift of the Charles E. Merrill Trust through 
Mr. & Mrs, Robert A. Magoi^ran 1822 

SOUP/PUNCH LADLE , Ster. silver w/vermeil bowl, V/m.Chavmer , London/ 
SALVER , ENGLISH, GEORGE III, ca I 808 (Sterling silver) 

SAL’vTR , STERLING SILVER, ENGLISH, GEORGE III, ca. 1794 
SALVER , STERLING SIU/ER, GEORGE III, Sheffield, ca. l824 
I-ELK JUG , STEFEING SILVER, AMSRIC/uN, Philadelphia, l835-l846 
HOT VJATER KETTLE AND SPIRIT VJARI-ER STAND , s/s , LONDON , ca . I 836 

SET OF FOUR GEORGS lU VERI-'EIL SERVING SPOONS , ENGLISH, London, l8C5 


Gift (Museum Foundation) of Dr. & Mrs, Karl Fischbach 


- 56 - 


APPEiroiX II - 5 


ADDITIONS - DE YOUNG MUS™ (Continued) 


75.24.8(a,b) 

75.2^.9(a-i) 

75.24.10 

75.24.11 

75.25.1(A,B) 

75.25.2 

75.26.1 

75.26.2 

75.26.3 

75.26.4 
75.26.3 
75.26.6 


75.27 

75.28 

75.29.1 

75.29.2 

75.29.3 

75.29.4 

75.30.1 

75.30.2 

75.30.3 

75.30.4 

75.30.5 

75.30.6 

75.30.7 

75.30.8 

75.30.9 

75.30.10 

75.31.1 

75.31.2 
75.31.3-372 

75.32 


GARNITURE COMPOTE WAH'^R, ENGLISH, Bigelow & Kennard ca l847 
CRUET STAI^ID V/ITH EIGHT FITTED GLASS BOTTLES , ENGLISH, London / 
COFFEE PO T, S'TERLING SILVER, GEORGE III, ENGLISH, London, ca 1827 
TEA POT , STEPE^ING SILVER, GEORGE III, ENGLISH, London, ca 1826 
Gift (Museim Foundation) of Dr. & Mrs, Karl Fischbach 
PAIR OF BUCKLES , ENGLISH, c. 1780 
BUCICLE , "ROSE CUT” GLASS, EI^IGLISH, c. 1780 
Gift of Mr. Stephen Crawfurd 
GURO MSK , IVORY COAST, AFRICA 
BAULE HEDDLE PULLEY ;-^^l , IVORY COAST, AFRICA 
BAULS HEDDLE PULLEY 7,'^2, IVORY COAST, AFRICA 
BAU^ HEDDLE PULLEY 7i^3, IVORY COAST, AFRICA 
BAULE HEDDLE P'ULLEYlpr T IVORY COAST, AFRICA 
BOBO BFu^SS RING , UPPER VOLTA 

Gift of Miss Constance Roach 
FEMAIE ANCESTOR FIGUPE , MALIIUEE, MALI, i-zood 
Gift of Mr, Zc Mrs, Erie Lor an 
NIGERIAN CEPJU-gC COOKING POT (possibly IBO) 

Gift of Ms Barbara M, Roth 
YORUBA CAP V/AIASKS ATI) ABSTRACT DESIGN 

PEICADE, FON, DAIiOME Y 

KOPHISD mW:! MASK . IBO, NIGERIA 
STORAGE CONTAIPiER V/ITH CO^/ER , DAHOMEY 
Gift of Dr, & Mrs. Robert Kuhn 
MEXICAN FAKE OF HUICHOL YARN PAINTING (was L75.17.1) 

THE LIFE FORCE OF PEYOTE , yarn painting (was L75,17.2) 

HOI-/ UE SACRIFICED THE DEER , yarn painting (was L75.17.3) /.4) 

THE DEAD SOUL’S JOUTEIEY TO THE SPIRIT V/ORLD , yarn ptg (was L75.17 
HOlv MAIZE BA.BY CAUSED THE FLOUERS TO GROV/ , yarn ptg (was L75.17.5 
HOV/ V/E CONTa-gLATE HIIOIRI IN V/IRIICUTA y.p. (v;as L75.17.6) 

THE HUICHOL RECEI^/E MAIZE IN THE FIRST TIMES y.p. (was L75.17.7) 
IlHE HELL VHIERE ALL SINNERS GO , yarn ptg. (was L75.17.9) 

V/HERE OFFERINGS ARE MADE IN THE SEA , yarn ptg. (was L75.17.10) 

AN OFFERING GltEDI TO THE TREE OF THE l/IND , yarn (was L75.17,ll) 
Gift of Mr. Peter Young (10 loans transferred to gifts) 

I4AIDEN SPIRIT (miA\J) CAP MASK , rPEGERIA, 130, H: 12” 

^lAIDEN SPIPJT (i-mv;) CAP MASK , NIGERIA, IBO, H; 17” 

COLLECTION OF 370 ASHANTI GEOMETRIC GOLD V/EIGHTS (70 lg,300 snail ! 

Gift of Dr, Sc Mrs, Harvey Crystal 
URH030 STANDING FIGURE 

Acquired in trade from Mr. Harvey Menist for: 

54.76.8 ESICIMO IVORY BQ\-/ DRILL 

45188 ESKIMO IVORY BO\IL DRILL 

2247 MAORI FEATHER CLOAK 

57 , 13.3 SUKU ”HEI‘.IBE” MASK 

59,45 ”U1-IEKE” KA17AIIAN V/OODEN BOV/L 


- 57 - 


APPENDIX II - 6 


ADDITIONS 


75.33 

75.34.1-4 

76.1.1 

76.1.2 

76.2 

76.3 

76.4 

76.5.1 

76.5.2 

76.6,1 

76.6.2 

76.6.3 

76.6.4 
76.6.3 
76.6.6 

76.6.7 

76.6.8 

76.6.9 

76.6.10 
76.6.11 
76.6.12 

76.6.13 

76.6.14 
76.6.13 
76.6.16 
76.6.17 

76.7 


76.8 

76.9.1 

76.9.2 

76.9.3 

76.9.4 

76.10 


DE YOIDIG MUSEUM (Continued) 


CHEST-ON-CHEST , FPDNCH, 17th c. (was L72.29) 

Gift of Dr. & Mrs, H. Sidney Newcomer 
SET OF FOUR DANK GPEEN GLASS V/INE BOTTLES , ENGLISH, c. 1780 
Gift of Mr. Eric Shrubsole 
OVAL DISH/PLATTEP, SPODE, ENGLISH, c. I 83 O 
CQ VEPvSD TUREEN A^ID STAND , SPODE, ENGLISH, c. I 83 O 

Gift of Mrs. George Crocker, thni The Museum Ainciliary 
SEPIK MASK, CLAY MODELLED ON BONT: , imJ GUINEA 

Gift of Edith and Joseph Hartnett in Memory of V/m.C. Harnett 
LAVA LAVA (TEdlLE), SATWAL ISLAND, YAP DISTRICT, MICRONESIA 
Gift of Mr, 8t Mrs, Peter V/addell 
RESTOPJiTION PORRINGER 8c FOOTED STAND , ETJGLISH, London, c. 1662 
Gift of The Roscoe and Margaret Oakes Foundation 
LEGA »NGINGA TYPE FIGLU^E , hone 
L EG A ^NGINGA TYPE FIGURE , hone 

Gift of Mr. & I-irs. Marc A. Franklin (anonymously) 

MIYAN POT VJ/GLYPH BAND , ceramic 

TEOTIHUACAI^ DANCER , ceramic figurine, early classic 

MAYA BAT GOD FIGUPJD, ceramic, Guatemala, pre-classic 

MACE HEAD W/^IPD-LINE HEAD , stone, Costa Rica 

MACE HEAD ¥/EAT-LIKE HEAD , stone, Costa Rica 

MACE liEAD lv70VHL-LII\E HEAD , stone, Costa Rica 

MICHOACAN FIGURINE TORSO , ceramic 

MICHOACAN FEI-IALE FIGURINE , ceramic 

CHUPICUARO FEMALE FIGURINE , ceramic 

MAYA "TCAKOL” CER.'\MIC POT 

M AYA INCISED (GLYPHTcI^MIC POT 

MAYA CERAliIC POT ^ilTII GLYPH BAl'iD , Late Classic (Polychrome) 

MAYA CERAI'4IC POLYCHROME BEAKER , Late Classic 
JALISCO CER.AIMC FE-IAXE FIGURE (STANDING) 

JAXISCO CERAI-ilC MALE FIGURE (SEATED) 

TLATILGO OLI^'iECOID FEMALE FIGURE (ST.^JIDING) 

MAYA JAINA CERAMIC FIGUP.I^IE IN FORiM OF SEATED HUNCHBACK 

Gift of Mr, & Mrs, Lev/is K, Land 

CARVED V/OODEN STANDING MAXE FIGURE , BAULE, IVORY COAST 

Acauired in trade from Robert H. LovMe Museum of Anthropology 
for: 37,13,16 CHIEF’S CHAIR (Axel M. Peterson Bequest) 

BENIN BELT MASK IN FORM OF LEOPARD , bronze, copper & Iron inlay 
Gift of Hie Salinger Fund 
MA.SH0NA HEAD REST, MOZAIHIQUE , wood 
ASHANTI GOLD V/EIGHT, GHANA (IN SHAPE OF A BACKREST) 

ASAHANTI GOLD MEIGHT , GHANA (IN SHAPE OF A FLAT BELL) 

ASHAiNTI GOLD V/EIGHT , GtlANA (IN SHAPE OF AN ADZE) 

Gift of Various Donors in Memory of V/illiam C, Hartnett 
PAIR OF GILT V/OOD CONSOLE TABLES & ERRORS , John Linnell, London, 1763 
,B2) Gift of the Charles E, Merrill Trust through 
Mr, and Mrs, Robert A. Magowan 


- 38 - 


APPENDIX II - 7 


ADDITIONS 


76,11 

76.12.1 

76.12.2 

76.13.1 

76.13.2 

76.13.3 

76.13.4 

76.14.1 

76.14.2 

76.14.3 

76.14.4 

76.14.5 

76.14.6 

76.14.7 

76.14.8 

76.14.9 

76. 14.10 

76.14. 11 

76.14.12 

76.14.13 

76.14.14 

76. 14.15 

76.14.16 

76.14.17 

76.14.18 

76. 14.19 

76. 14.20 

76. 14.21 
76,14.22-3 
76,14,24-5 
76. 14.26 
76.14. 27-8 


DE YOUNG MUSSUI4 (Continued) 


WOODEN HELMET MASK , MAIEILLA, NIGEPJA 

Gift of Saks Fifth Avenue through Mr, James Ludvn.g 
V/ATER SPIPJT MA SK, IJA17, rPEGERIA, polychrome wood 
STAFF V//3IPD , YOHUBA, NIGERIA, wrought iron 

Acquired in trade with Mr. Henry Menist (see 75.32) 

CHASTITY BELT, PULUSIK ISLAI'ID, EAST CAROLINES 
ADZE , KAPINGAi-LARAiNGI, EAST CAROLINES 
SHARKJICOK, EAST CAJ^CLINES 
FAN , EAST CAROLirffiS 

Gift of Mr. H. D. Huxley 
BASKET , MAI^IBAICUSHU, BOTSWANA 
BASIGT , M/JIBaICJSHU, BOTSV/ANA 
BASKET W/Hi^roLE , BAYEI TRIBE, BOTSV/ANA 
BASKET , iuE-lEAKUSHU, BOTSV/ANA 
B ASKET W/Ui'IFINISHED RIM , MAMBAICUSHU, BOTSV/ANA 
WTC, MAIB/JCUSIFJ, ANGOLA 
APRON , MA'^BAvUSHU, ANGOLA 
LARGE CHILD APRON , GUI BUSHl®!, GHANZI 
SMALL CHILD’S .4PR0N , GWI BUSHI'^IEN, GHANZI 
CARRYING BAG , GWI BUSHlIEr'I, GHANZI 

HUilTING SATCHEL W/CARRYING HANDLE ON ONE SIDE , G\.E BUSffi'EN, GHANZI 

HOLLOW BONE SMOKjPJG PIPE, GVJI BUSHItEN, GHANZI 

SM4LL SHOICENG PIPE , GVE BUSHI4SN, GHAIZI 

PIPE CLEANER , GV/I BUSHl^IEI'I, GHANZI 

BEAD NECICLACE , SHELL, GV/I BUSHITEN, GHAIZI 

NECKLACE OF SMALL POUND OSTRICH SHELL EEAJ3S, GV.T: BUSHI'>IEVI, GHAIZI 
PORCUPINE OUILL/OSTRICH SHELL OPilA'IEVIT , GWI BUSA'IEN, GHANZI 
FINGER PIANO, WOOD WA'iET4A KE'ZS, GV/I BUSffi'IEN, GHAIZI 
SCENT ECX OF TURTLE SHELL W/POWDER PUFF , GWI BUSIDEEH, GHAIZI 
SCENT BOX OF TURTLE SHELL W/6 STRINGS OF BEADS , GlvI BUSHI'IEN, GHANZI 
PAIGE PJ.TTLE , GV/I EUStR'iEN, GHANZI 
SPEAR/BCW , GV-E BUSHI^IEN, GHANZI 
DIGGING STICK/FIRE STICK , GVE BUSHMEN, GH.AZI 
HUNTING POUCH W/FOUR AFcKOWS , GVE BUSIAIEN, GHANZI 
Tl/0 OSTRICH EGGS FOR CARRYING WATER , GVE BUSHI®!, GHAIZI 
Gift of Mr, and Mrs. Charles FraAcel 


Total; 64o item 


- 59 - 


PENDIX II - 8 


Loans TO tho M, H« de Yourif? Memorial Museum 


*L75.15.1 

*L75.13.2 

*L73.13.3 

"L75.13.4 

"L75.13.5 

*L75.13.6 

'* 175 . 14 . 1-12 

-*175.15 

-*175.16.1-57 

175.17.1-99 

*175.13 

*175.19 

*175.20,1 

*175.20.2 

*175.20.3 

*175.20.4 

*175.20.5 

*175.21 

*175.22.1 

175.22.2 

*175.23.1-14 

*175.24.1-33 

*175.25.1-26 

L75.26(A,B) 

L75.27 

*175.28,1-75 

175.29 

*175.30 

*175.31-1.3 

*175.32 


MAN IN 2CI-1ANTIC LANDSCAPl , oil ptg by Atkinson Grimshaw 
JATiES MACr^M\lD IIIGLIJIVULDIE , oil ptg by Gilbert Stuart 
LANDSC/iPE IJITH ANIMALS , oil ptg by Roland Savery 
PEASANTS HEARING A TOAST , oil ptg by Paolo Ronaldi 
GEORGE \7ASHINGT0N , oil ptg by Jane Stuart 
COON DOG , I'/atercolor by Andrew Wyeth 
Loaned by Mrs, Peter McBean 

11 PASTEL DRAWINGS 1 OIL/CAI'IVAS BY PHILLIS IDEAL (Exliibition) 
Loaned by the Artist through The Grapestake Gallery 
TAPESTRY »SUI-1I^IER & V/INTER " 

Loaned by Mrs, Fred Kohlenberg to be restored by 
Tapestry Conservation Department 
52 BLK & VJII PHOTOGRAPHS S: 3 PHOTO ALBIMS BY JOB RAMOS (Exhibition) 

Loaned by the Artist 

COLLECTION OF 99 HUICHOL YAPU DPJIV/IMGS (FUTURE GIFT) 

Loaned by Mr, Peter Young 

BUST OF YOUNG WOMAIM , bronze, enamel & green stone by Korschann 
Loaned by Charles Douglass for possible Museum purchase 
HEAD OF YOUTH , Apulian Kotyle, 4thc, B.C, 

Loaned by I^Ir. William S, Picher for Egyptian Exhibition 
TECTILE . MONROVIA, LIBERIA 
TEdlLE . AIOUI, IVORY COAST 
TE:(TILE . dcgon (bought in SANGHA, MJlLI) 

TEXTILE . KPELLE, LIBERIA 
TEXTILE . I^ELLE, LIBERIA (TOViN OF KPAIYEA 
Loaned by Mr, Thomas K. Seligman 
textile IROM NORTH VIETNAI4 

Loaned by Mr, Allan H, Berrin 
YORUBA EPA HEADDRESS. BAiMGBOYE SCULPTOR 

URHOBO STAI'IDING FIGUPvE (Used in trade: see Accession Number 75.32) 
Loaned by Mr. Harvey Menist for possible Museum purchase 
14 V/ATERCOLOPId, PAINTINGS 8c DPiAWlNGS BY LENNY SILVERBERG (E::hibit) 
Loaned by the Artist through the James V/illis Gallery 
33 V/HITE PORCELAIN OBJECTS BY COILLE HOOTOI (Exhibition) 

Loaned by the i-'intist 

DPJV^.INGS. DOCUI-IENTS, PHOTOS OF CHRISTO’S ’’RUNNING FENCE PROJECT'* 

Leaned by the Artist (Exliibition) 

PAIR OF TORCKEREB , v/rought iron/w 3 tiers, Italian 
Loaned by Mr, & Mrs, Leonard Martin 
ORIETTRAL RUG (FOR USE IN MEW ENGLISH GALLERY-GALLERY #17) 

Loaned by Mr, & kirs, D, Graeme Keith 
75 OBJECTS RELATING TO THE MEDCICAkl '>DAY OF TItE DEAD” CELEBRATION 

Loaned by Yolanda Garfias Woo ' (Exhibition)'" 

NAVAJO SILVER NCECiaACE W/39 BEADS & HAND STAMPED DESIGN MOTIFS 

Loaned by Mr. Fred Iving, V/est of the Moon 
SILVER POPRINGER V//COVER 8. FOOTED SALVER . London, 1662 

Loaned by S.J, Shrubsole (Purchased; see Accession No, 76,4) 
THREE ORIENTAL RUGS (for possible purchase) 

Loaned by Mr, Joseph ILilejian, Carpets of the Orient 
MOTHER AND TV/O CHILDREN , oil ptg by Mary Cassatt 
Loaned by Mrs, Alexander Albert 


- 60 - 


APPEI'IDIX II - 9 


Loans TO De Yoimg; Memorial Museum (Continued) 


L75.33 

*L73.34.1 

*L73.3^.2 

L73.35.1 

L75.35.2 

L75.33.3 

L73.33.4 

L75.35.3 

L73.35.6 

L75.35.7 

L73.35.8 


ILEIIE BOTTLE ^ dark brovniA>lack glass, English, late l 8 th c. 
Loaned by Mr. Leroy Dutro 

BENIN BELT MASK IN FORI-I 07 LEOPAED , metal (Purchased; see #76.8) 
BENIN FACS , bronze (Possible purchase ) 

Loaned by Tom Alexander, Alexander Suggs Gallery 
SOLID CLAY FIGUPE, TLATILCO STYLE 


PLAIN\7ARE BOVJL, 

CHU'PICUARO STYLE, 

CLAY 

POLYCHROME TRIPOD EOV/L, CHUPICUARO 

STYLE, CIAY 

STANDING FEMALE 

FIGURE, CHTPICUARO 

STYLE, CLAY 

PTMAL.E FIGURINE. 

, MIGHOACAI^ STYLB, 

CLAY 

FEMALE FIGURINE 

IMTH CHILD, MICHOACAN STYLE, CLAY 

FEMALE FIGURII'iE, 

, CHUTPICUARO STYLE, 

CLAY 


STANDING STOILE FIGURE, TEOTIHUACAN-GUE'APEEO STYLE 


Loaned by Mr. & Mrs. Erie Loran 

L75.36 SET OF FOUR GEORGE III CAI^IDLESTICItS , J. Carter, London, 1772-1773 
(A,B,C,D) Loaned by Mr. Richard Gump 

L76.1.1-12 12 MAYAN, AZTEC, OLI-IEC. COSTA RICAN, etc, OBJECTS FOR DISPLAY 
Loaned by Mr, Ed Nagel 

*L76, 2.1-20 20 BLK & m PHOTOGPJgHS OF I'ffiST AFRICA BY LUCAS KIERS (Exhibition) 


*L76.3 

L76.4(A,B) 

L76.3a-31 

L76.6.1 

L76.6.2 

L76.6.3 

L76.6.4 

L76.6.5 

L76.6,6 

L76.6.7 


Loaned by the Ai'tist 

V/ARRIOR ON HORSEBACK , bronze on marble base, loth c. 

Loaned by Mr, Ernest Joresco for possible purchase 
(transfered to Legion of Honor, 7/2/76) 

NAYARIT PAIR, CERAMIC 

Loaned by Mrs, Russell E. Smith 

31 BLK & PHOTOGRAPHS OP OTAmO INDIilNS, ECUADOR BY BENNA KOLINST: 

Loaned by the Artist (Exhibition) 

MAN IN ROMANTIC LAIIDSCAPS , oil ptg by AtldLnson Grinishax'; 

JAI^'iES MACD bMALD INGLEIDYULDIE, oil ptg by Gilbert Stuart 


LANDSCAPE IviTH AI'i'IMALS , oil ptg by Roland Savery 
PEASAl'fTS HEARING A TQ.''LT , oil ptg by Paolo Ronaldi 
HiE TURICEY SHOOT , oil ptg by Julian Scott 
COON DOG , v/ater color by Andrew V/yeth 
STARS OP THE RACE , oil ptg by Alfred J, Munnings 
Loaned by Mrs, Peter McBean 


Total (for other than temporary exiiibits; 
162 items 


* Note; Loans returned during period of the report other than those peirt 

of ercliibitions; 21 

Loans returned this period which v;ere loaned previous to 

the 1976-1976 period 107 

125 


- 61 - 


APPENDIX II - 10 


Loans FPQM the M, lu de Young Memorial Museum 


Various 

Numbers 

59 - 48.13 

59.21.2 

60.24 

75.31 


50558 


Various 

Numbers 


59.32 


16.285 


60.7 


Various 

Numbers 


10 ITEIIS: MOPTAPS, FIELD CANNON, PEDESTALS , To: 

OEGAN, SETTEE, APMCBAIR AND SIDE CHAIN 

DDESS , American, c. 1900 
DNESS, American, I 890 /I 9 OO 
l-UDDING DPJi]S3, American 1902 


201 ASHANTI GOLDV/EIGHTS , 3 SPOONS 
1 CONTAINED V//LID 


FOX IN A CIIICICEN YARD , oil ptg 
Jean-Bap tiste Huet 


Presidio Array Museum 
Indefinite Loan by 
D.G, Keith 
July 1, 1975 Sc 
July 25, 1975 

To: Calif. State University 
Fullerton, Ca. 

" ASHANTI GOLDV/EIGHT EXISBITION 
Aug. 15, 1975 -Aug. 28 , 1975 

To: Toledo Museum of Art 
Art Institute of Chicago 
National Gallery ofCanada 
" THE AGE OF LOUIS XV; FPENCH 

PAINTING 1710-1774 " ' 

Sept. 29 , 1975 -June 1, 1976 
(v;. Legion Collection ptg.) 


15 ITEMS: PAPISPE, DAGGERS, SUIT 

OF API'-IOP, HELMET, ETC . 


To: Oakland Museum 
Special. Eriiibition arranged 
by Tom Lark, Asst, to Ben 
Hazard, Curator of Erchibit- 
ions Division, Oakland Mus, 
11/1-12/1, 1975 


SAINT CIIPISTOPHEP . carved wood 
V/est German, c. l4C0 


To: Portland Art Museum 
' »MASTEPV/ORICS IN 1700D: THE 


CHRISTIAI^I TP.^^DITI0N " 

11/11/75-1/6/76 


CHASUBLE , center front & back 
V/orkshop of F. Glaize, Krakow, 
Poland, c. 1747-1758 

BENJAI-gN IP.HIKLIN , terra cotta 
Jean Antoine Houdon 


20 STENCILS .4ND 7 PATi^EP.NED 


To: Art Institute of Chicago 
" VESTMENTS " 

11/11/75-1/18/76 

To: Fogg ikrt Muse’ura, Harvard 
University, Cambridge, Mass. 
" lETAI-'OPPHOSES IN IQTH 

CENTURY SCULPTURE " 

11/19/75-1/7/76 

To: Rudolph Schaeffer School 
of Design, San Francisco 
Special Ibciiibition 
11 / 19/75 to present 


- 62 - 


APPENDIX II - 11 


kZOSS 

41771 

37656 

43630 

52,10 


69.30.6 


Various 

Niunbers 


Various 

Numbers 


49835 


X71.130 

(a,b,c) 


L74,22.1 

L74.22,2 

L74.22.3 


Loans FPOM M, H. de Youns: Memorial Museum (Continued) 


IHE MIPROH , oil ptg., van Sloun 
KCPULSION OF ADAIi & EVE FPOI-l 
GAPDEN OF EDEN , oil ptg, van Sloun 
THE V/INEI-'LAKEIR , Arthur IIathei;s 
DEEP VA'TEP, oil ptg, I.A.Djenyeff 

YUCCA , pastel by Hov/ard Cook 


COLONEL AAEON CG-DSN , oil ptg 
Ezra Ames 


CAIE^ONBALLS , PSDESTALE 

, CHANDELIERS . 

HlH-IETS , RADIO, ETC, 


30 ITEI'IS: PKOTCGPi\PHS , 

LiEMOPJlBILIA 

PEPTAII'UNG TO 1894 MIDl.'INTEP EIPOSI- 

'TION, GOLDEN GATS PAPJC MUSEUM ETC, 

MARIUS AMIDST EIE RUIN 

S OF CARTHAGE 


MANTSli SET , 3 pcs, gilt on metal, 
marble, cut crystal 


To : California Historical 
Society Special Exhibit arrang- 
ed by Catherine Hoover 
11/22/75-12/22/75 


To: Museum of New Mexico, 

Santa Fe - Special Exhibition 
7A/75-Fresent 

To: University of Arizona 
Museum of Art: 1/11/76-2/15/76 
Santa Barbara Museum of Art 

2/29/76-3/28/76 

V/i Chita State Museim, Kansas 
4/11/76-5/9/76 

" 1st FLO' .EPS OF OUP VSELDEP^mSS " 

To: Presidio Army Museum, S.F, 
Presidio, Indefinite Loan 
arranged by D, Graeme Keith 

To: Calif. Historical Society 
San Francisco 

" GOLDEN GATE PAPK: ITS HISTORY " 

To: Yale Urd.versity Art Gallery 
Nev; Haven, Connecticut 
2A5/76-7A/76 
Victoria & Albert Museum, 
London, England 

6A/76-II/I/76 

".LMEPICAN APT; 1750-l8c0, 

TO^ JAPPS INDEPENDENCE " 

To: The Museum of Fine Arts 
Houston, Texas 
" THE GO E- gC PEVIVAL STYLE IN 
AI lEPy A ,~~iH3C-1870 ' ' 

3Af/76-6/'22/76 


EIE GUID E . v;/c by 
on THE CLI FF, vz/c 
THE V/OOD CHOPPEP , 


l/inslov; Homer 
by V/inslov; Homer 
v//c by V/inslov; Homer 


To: George Hart, Marin Co,, Ca, 
Temporary removal of loan mat- 
erial for v/edding at lender’s 
home. 3 / 25 / 76 - 3 / 30/76 


- 63 - 


APPEiroiX II - 12 


Loans FROM M, H. de Young Memorial Museum (Continued) 


Various 

Numbers 


41773 


Various 

Numbers 


Various 

Numbers 


59.29.2 


69.30.21 


52.6.7 


75.18.27 

55327 


44.17 

6383 

6384 

6385 

41988 


3,247 ITEI-IS: ETHNIC ARTIFICATS, 

CERAinC, ITCOP, PiET;iL, STONE, ETC . 


SUITER LANDSCAPE, oil ptg 
E. Charlton Fortune 


To; S.F, Unified School District 
ESEA Title I 3B90 (Yolanda 
Garfias V/ 00 ). Indefinite loan 
of objects to be used in study 
packets circiilated to various 
schools in the area. 

4 / 1/76 - Present 

To: Muckenthaler Cultural Cen- 
ter, Fullerton, Ca. 

" WOIEN ARTISTS IN THE VEST , 

1860-1950 " 

4/1/76-5/30/76 


16 ITEMS: BELTS, STIRRUPS, SCABBARDS , 


AXE CARRIERS, POUCHES, ETC . 


60 ITEMS; FIGUREIEAD, SHIPYARD 

TOOLS, SHIPBOARD FURNITURE, 

INSTRUiENTS, ETC . 


To: Presidio Army Museum 
San Francisco Presidio 
Indefinite loan arrang. Keith 
4/23/76-Present 

To: Maritime Museum, S.F. 
Indefinite loan arr, Keith 
4/23/76-Present 


CONVERSION OF CLOVIS , oil ptg To: Hartnell College, Salinas 

attr to Roger van der V/eyden ’^ RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL ” 

MYSTICAL r'LARRIAGE OF ST. CATHERINE 

Oil ptg. atr. to F. Carracci 

ELIJAH RECEIVING THE MESSAGE OF THE L0RI3 

Oil ptg, atr. to F. Bassano 


ENGLISH APIICHAIR , 17th c, 
HOUSEHOLD HEATH, oil ptg. 
School of NoriAdch 


To: Office of the Mayor 
San Francisco City Hall 
5/l4/76-Present 
(’.Tith Legion collection 
objects) 


PORTRAIT OF ADA BADGER, oil ptg 
THE ABDUCTION (RAPE OF THE SABINES ) 

THE Iin/ASION (R.\PE OF TIE SA BINES ) 

THE CAPTIVITY (RAPE OF THE SABINES ) 

all oil paintings 

SACPA IEN TO IITOIAN V/ ITH DOGS, oil ptg 
All a»' :vve ptgs by Charles C. Nalil 


To: S.B. Crocker Art Gallery 
Sacramento, California 
''CIIARIJ:^ CHRIS TIAN NAHL ; 
GC^'R SI^^ ARTIS T” 
-/l4/7b-8/29/76 
(later to Oakland Museum) 


II 


- 64 - 


APPENDIX II - 13 


62.38 
46463 
43239 
43923 
43238 

35.39 
X 71 . 44.4 
59.2 
66.14 


PICTUPESQUE LANDSCAPE , Unknown Venetian To; Transaraerica Pyramid 
S TREET SCENE IN HAVANA , Clarkson Dye Gallery, San Francisco 
THE TEMPLE OF SATURN , Luigi Bazzani (thru Art Programs, Inc.) 

AI^ EASTERN SCEIUC , A. L. Pasini " THE ART OF TPjWEL: FROM THE 

STREET SCEIIE IN ALGIERS , Keller-Reutling COLLECTION OF THE FINE ARTS 
VIEW OF FLOREiNCE FROM THE ARNO , Unknoivn MUSEUMS OF SAN FRAI\[CISCO »' 

A BROADSIDE OF TAMALPAIS , William Keith ‘ 

ROCK OF AGES, ROIiDA , A, Sheldon Pennoyer 
ARCHITECTURAL STUDY , John Singer Sargent 


1924,2 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE LEKYTHOS To: Museum of Art, University 

1925.7 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE LEKPIHOS of Oregon, Eugene. - 

1923.368 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE NECK AMPHORA "THE LABORS OF HERAKLES ON 

1923.346.38 CALENE BLACK GLAZED PHIALE ANTIQUITIES FROM V/EST COAST 

35104 STONE HEAD OF A BEAPDED MAN (FRAGMENT) COLLECTIONS '' 3 / 22 / 76 - 8 / 13/76 
392 (A,B) pair of GOLD EARRINGS (''HERAKLES CLUBS ") 


34936 SACRAMSI^ITO railway station , Wm. Hahn To: Oakland Museum, Art Div. 

43231 INDIAI^IS IN THE SNOW , V/m. Hahn " TOLLIAiM HAHN EXHIBITION " 

6/1/76-Present (I 7 ill travel 
to 3 other museums) 


34.36.23/4 Pair CRYSTAL CANDLESTICKS , 19 th c. 
1963.23.11 PUNCHBONTi , porcelain, ca. 1790 
64 . 31.4 TOBY JUG , ceramic 
34.36.31 CRYSTAL CORDIAL GLASS 

63 . 19.24 " FIRING GLASS ", ca. I800 

72.27.1-10 10 PIECES, MEISSEN TEA SERVICE 


To: Cal, Academy of Sciences, 
San Francisco. Indefinite 
Loan arranged by D.G, Keith 
for use in new HALL OF MAN 
display. 6/8/76-Present 


V.arious 13 DRII^IKING VESSELS , l 6 th- 19 th c. To: The V/ine Museiun of San 

Numbers 2 TIN- GLAZED EARTHENT/’/ARE PLATES, I8 c. Francisco. "THOMA.S JEFFERSON 

AND V/INE IN IL\RLY AI^EEiRICA " 
9/23/75-6/23/76 (Extended 

beyond that date) 


Total Items Loaned to Other Institutions During Period: 3? 728 


Items listed above returned during same period: 


288 


Items from previous peidods returned: 3 

San Mateo Historical Society 3 

California Historical Society 1 

Oakland Museum, Art Division 111 

Oakland Museum, History Division 3 

Total Items Loaned Instituolo.is 

Returned During Period: 4o6 


- 63 - 



I 


APPENDIX III 


RBCAPITULATION OF ITEMS H^IIDLSD BY THE REGISTRAR'S OFEICE 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF THE LEGION OF HONOR (not including: Achenbach Foundation) 

FISCAL YEAR 1973-19^ 


Additions 8c Deaccessions in the Permanent Collections 
Collection Objects loaned to Borrowers 
Temporary Ebchibition Loans to the Museum 
Possible Purchase Loans to the Museum 
Extended 8c Miscellaneous Loans to the Museum 


Objects Registered in Movement at the Legion of Honor: 


In 

Out 

5 

3 

32 

47 

521 

579 

12 

5 

25 

45 

595 

634 


Total 


1,279 


Permanent Collection Photograph Orders 
Labeled, Invoiced and Addressed 

# of orders for photo!?ra-nhs 


1975 17 25 

1976 70 

Total: kO orders for 95 photographs sent out 


ADDITIONS TO THE COLLECTIONS OF THE CALIFORMA PALACE OF THE LEGION OF HONOR 


(7/1/75-12/31/75 No Additions to the Collections) 


1976.1 Prints accessioned by the Department of Prints and Drav/ings 

1976.2 Drav/ings accessioned by the Department of Prints and Drav/ings 
(see Appendix I) 

1976.3 THREE SCENES raOM THE LIFE OF CHRIST , tapestry, Flemish, c. 1510 
Gift of the Roscoe and Margaret Oakes Foundation, and Charles 

de Brette^'/ille, Richard B, Gum.p, Archer M, Huntington 8c George D, Smith 

1976.4 LA BAIGNADE (The Earthing Place), 1786, painting by Joseph Vernet, 
Georgia M« V/orthington Fund Purchase 

1959.70 10 RESCUED FROM AR G US BY 1-ERCTJRY , Tapestry, Brussels, c. I 65 O 

1959.80 BATTLE OF MARCUS AURELIUS , Tapestry, Brussels, c, I 65 O 

Formally listed as gifts v.dth Donors retaining life estate 
(accepted April 13, 1959) were received at the from the 

Estate of Sidney M. Ehrraan and Florence Hellvr' ■ -i. 

1964,75 A SUNirf D jr, 1902 , painting by Thaddeus I7ei’'''v 

forraall'/ as a gift \dth Donor retaini.vg estate 

(acceptr-i June 27, 1964,) received from the Estate of H. S. 

Parse.. - ■ H. 


- 66 - 


APPENDIX III - 2 


Correction to the Annual Perjort of 197‘'l— 1973 


1973.^.1 SPANISH APMOPIAL , Tapestry, Spanish Colonial, c, l600 

1973.4.2 SCENE raOh THE TRIUMPHS OF PETPJmCH: THE TPIUI^H OF DEATH OVE-P 
CKAS'PITY , Tapestry, Eranco-Flemish, c, 13CO 

1975.4.3 igjPDISTAN OP PERSIAN CAPPST , l6-17th century 
1973.4.^1 DRAGON CAPPET , Caucasian, 17th century 

The above gifts v/ere transfered from the Museum Society, and 
were originally gifts to the Patrons of Art and Music by Mr. 
and Mrs, Robert F. Gill in 1959. 

All other gifts to the Patrons of Art and Music have not been 
transferred to The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and have 
remained as loans to us by the Museum Society, Tlierefore all 
1973«4 prefix numbers listed in the 1974-1973 annual report are 
cancelled and only the four objects above should have been 
accessioned in-th the nuiabers entered herein. 

Objects Deaccessioned from the Collections of the California Palace of the 

Le.cdon of Honor - Fiscal Year 1973-1976 


1927.64 

1937.170 

1957.r71 

1969.18 


1940.80 


1952.53 


no Jr 
no # 


BOHEt-'IIAN FEAST , Tapestry, French, iSth Cen, 

Gift of ilrcher M, Huntington 

PEASANTS DINING BEFORE AN INI'I , Tapestry, Flemish, l8th Cen, 

Gift of George D, Smith 

PEASANTS DRII^lOIxNr^ AITO DANCING IN A GRO^/E , Tapestry, Flemish, l8th C. 
Gift of George D, Smith 

GARDEN LANDS CjAPE , Tapestry, French, l8th Cen. 

Gift of Charles de Bretteville 

The above tapestries v;ere exchanged, in a group with others from 
the M. K. de Young Museum collections, for 1976.3? a tapestry 
purchase approved March 17? 1976, the previous approval of all 
donors having been secured by the Associate Curator of Tapestries, 
Department of Decorative Arts 

LE PECHEUR (The Fisherman), Tapestry, Flemish, 17th Cen. 

Mildred Anna V/illiaras Collection 

LOUIS XIV AT DUNKERQUE, Tapestry, French, l8th Cen, style reproductior 
Gift of Paul Dietrich 

Approved for Deaccession, April 27? 1976 

BATTLE SCENE , Tapestry, Antwerp, 17th Cen., Heller Gift 

DIAIIA AND HUNTRESSES , Tapestry, Oudenaarde 

The above urmumbered tapestries submitted for deaccessioning by 
the Department of Decorative Arts were approved Apr, 27? 1976. 


- 67 - 


APPENDIX HI - 3 


Loans TO the C^aliiornia Palace of the Lef?:ion of Honor 


11.73.1- 156 

20.73 

21.73.1- 83 


22.75.1-45 

23*73 


26.75 

27.75 

28.75 

29.75 

30.75 
1.76 


2.76 

3.76 

4.76 

5.76 
29.73 

6.76 

7.76 

8.76 

9.76 

10.76 

11.76 

12.76 

13.76 

14.76 


156 pottery and stone objects from Mesoamerica, Exhibition 
lent by the Collectors, jyir. & Mrs. Levri.s K, Land. 

Untitled, landscape painting by Alfred J. Mimnings 
lent for exar;iination by Peter McBean 

NAPOLEONIC S^CYLB FRENCH l8th CETTTURY NECESSAIRE , mahoganny & 
brass case containing 83 objects of silver, steel, ivory, wood 
leather, crystal & brass for the drafting table, ld.tchen table 
dressing table and dining table. 

Lent anonynously 

45 examples of Calligraphy on paper. Exhibition 

Lent by Sai Francisco Public Library, Special Collections 

ORCHARD A? P ONTOIS E, painting by Paul Cezanne 

WOMAN AND CHILD FEEDING WATERFOWL , painting by Claude Monet 

STREET SCE-^IE , painting by Maurice Utrillo 

Lent Anonymously 

EIE SAILOR *3 RETURN , painting by Toby Edward Rosenthal 

Lent by tlr.e Florence Heilman Ehrman Trust 

LADY SEATED AT VIRGINAL , painting by Jan Vermeer 

Lent Anonymously for Possible Purchase 

LA BAIGNADE . by Joseph Vernet 

Lent Anonymously for Possible Purchase 

BACCILAJTALS GROUP , terra cotta sculpture by Clodion 

Lent by the Norton Simon Inc Foundation 

THE ADTOITURES OF CAPTAIN CCOK , I 8 panels of l8th Cen. 

French WaJ.lpaper, Lent by the Estate of Gertrude H. Dodge 
YOUIIG W0M7JT IN A BED BODICE HOLDING A MANDOLIN 

painting by Camille Corot 

PORTPAIT OF A PEASAI^FT , painting by Vincent Van Gogh 
JEAIRIE HEEUTEPJNS, THE ARTISTES \70MAN , painting by Modigliani 
THE CATIEDRAL OF ROUE I'I, painting by Claude Monet 
THE ARTISTES GARDEN AT VETHEUIL , painting by Claude Monet 
EXOTIC LAiMDSCAPE . by Henri Rousseau (re-lent) 

Lent by the Norton Simon Inc Foundation 
LANDSCAPE IN FRANCE , painting by Leon Richet 
Lent by Melpomene Zones 
THE SIGNAL , painting by Eugene Delacroix 
Lent Anonymously for Possible Purchase 
3 VIEWS OF THE BRQOICLYN SANITARY FAIR , l864, lithographs 
Lent by Ian McICibbin WhELte 

Untitled (oiO, silk screen print by Susan D. Coerr 
Lent by the Artist 

SEULE . 1894 , painting by Edmond Fran 9 ois i\man-Jean 
LOIE FULL ER, painting by Charles Maurin 
Lent Anonymously for Possible Purchase 
SEATED MONK , painting by Camille Corot 
Lent Anonymously for Possible Purchase 


- 68 - 


APPENDIX III - 4 


Loans TO the California Palace of the Legion of Honor (Continued) 


14. 76a. 1-239 

15.76 

16.76 


17 . 76.1 

17 . 76.2 

17 . 76.3 

17 . 76.4 

17 . 76.5 

17 . 76.6 

17 . 76.7 
17.7608 

17 . 76.9 

17.76.10 

17.76.11 

17.76.12 

17.76.13 

17 . 76 .1 4 

17.76.15 

17.76.16 

17 . 76.17 

17.76.18 

17.76.19 

17.76.20 

17.76.21 

17.76.22 

17.76.23 

17 . 76.24 

17.76.25 

17.76.26 

17 . 76.27 

17.76.28 

17.76.29 

17.76.30 

17.76.31 

17.76.32 

17.76.33 

17.76.34 

17.76.35 

17.76.36 

17.76.37 

17.76.38 

17.76.39 

17 . 76.40 
17 . 76 .i{l 

17 . 76.42 

17.76.43 


239 examples of Japanese Packaging: Elxhibition 
Lent by the American Federation of Arts 

A MAN V/llH A RING , painting by an Unknown Florentine Artist 
Lent Anonymously for Possible Purchase 
PORTRAIT OF AGIUHS TOBIN, painting by Charles Nahl 
Lent by Agnes Albert 

THE MADONNA OF THE APPLE TREE , by Lucas Cranach the Elder 
DEAD CHPIST V/ITH THE VIRGIN MARY AND AN ANGEL , by Veronese 
THE LUTE PLAYER « c. 1596 , by Caravaggio 
PORTRAIT OF AN ACTOR , c. 1620 - 23 , by Domenico Fetti 
LANDSCAPE , c. 1775 -o 5 < by Francesco Guardi 
MAECENAS PPJUSENTING THE ARTS TO AUGUSTUS , by Tiepolo 
TANCPID AI'ID ERMINIA , c. I63I, by Nicolas Poussin 
A VISIT TO GRAl'IDMQTHSR , c. l64o, by Louis Le Nain 
LA^IDSCAPE i/giH THE REST ON THE FLIGHT INTO EGYPT (NOON ), I66I, 
by Claude Gellee called Claude Lorrai n 
LANDSCAPE NEAR BEAUVAIS , c. 1742 , by Francois Boucher 
THE STOIIDI lass , by Jean-Honor e Fragonard 

THE ATTRIBUTES OF THE ARTS , 1766, by Jean-Bap tiste-Siraeon Cliardin 
THE REPAST (BREAKFAST ), c. I6I8, by Diego de Silva y Velazquez 
VE:TH a do g, c. 1^61, by Bartolome Esteban Murillo 
THE YOUI^IG VIRGIN PRAYING , c. I66O, by Francisco de Zurbaran 
LANDSCAPE WITH A WAGON , c. I618, by Peter Paul Rubens 
r^AimY GROUP , c. 3J2O-2I, by Anthony Van Dyck 
S AS ICE A AS FLORA , 1634 , by Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn 
DAVID Airo URIAH, c. I665, by Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn 
STILL LIFE WITH CRAB , l 648 , by V/illem Claesz Heda 
PORTHCET OF A MAN , c. I65I, by Frans Hals 
PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN (CATRINA LEUNINT^ ) , by Gerard Ter Borch 
A FOREST MARSH , c. I665, by Jacob Van Ruisdael 
PORTRAIT OF A LADY, by Thomas Gainsborough 
^LL LIEF , c." i 8 ~ 99 i by Paul Cezanjie 

INHERE APJE YOU GOING? OU VAS-FU? , l 393 , by Paul Gauguin 

STILL LIFE ICETH '^THE DANCE », 1909 , by Henri Matisse 

THE PAIH'IIIR«S FAMILY , 1911 , by Herrd. Matisse 

m'ENDSHIP (L» AMITIE ) , 1908, by Pablo Ruiz Picasso 

V/OPIAN l/ITH A FAN , 1908, by Pablo Ruiz Picasso 

PORTRAIT OF CATHERPIE NELIDOV , 1773 , by Dmitri G. Levitsl<y 

FORTUNE TELLING , l 642 , by Alexei Gravidlovich Venetsianov 

SELF PORTRAIT , 1849 , by Karl Ivanovich Briullov 

V/ATER 8c ROCKS NEAR PAIAZZUOLA, by Aleksandr Andreyev! ch Ivanov 

VIEV/ OF CONSTANTINOPLE BY MOONLIGHT, l 846 , by Ivan K. Aivazovsky 

PORTRAIT OF IVAN I, SHISffiCTN , 1680, by Ivan Nikolaevich Kramskoy 

EVENING IN THE UKRAINE , 1678-I9OI, by Arkhip I. Kuinji 

PORTRAIT OF ANTON RUBINSTEIN CONDUCTING , I887, by Ilya E. Repin 

PORTRAIT OF TOLSTOY , I9OI, by Ilya Efimovich Repin 

SILENCE , 1898, by Isaac Ilyich Levitan 

PORTRAIT OF MARIA FEDEROVNA MOROZOVA , by Valentin A. Serov 
PQRTAIT OF AI^INA PETROVNA OSTROUMOVA , by Konstantin A. Somov 
PORTRAIT OF SERGEI DIAGHILEV WITH HIS NURSE , by Leon Bales t 
all paintings lent by The State Russian Museum and The Hermitage 
Museum, Leningrad, U.S.S.R, 

- 69 - 


APPENDIX III - 5 


18.76 

19.76 

20.76 

21.76 

22.76 

23.76 

25.76.1 

25.76.2 

25.76.3 

25.76.4 

25.76.5 

25.76.6 

25.76.7 

25.76.8 

25.76.9 

25.76.10 

25.76.11 

25.76.12 

25.76.13 

25. 76.14 

25.76.15 


26.76.1 

26.76.2 
26.76.i^ 

26.76.5 

26.76.6 . 

26.76.7 

26 . :.8 

26.76.9 

26.76.10 

26.76.11 

26.76.12 

26.76.13 

26. 76.14 

26.76.15 

26.76.16 

27.76 

28.76 

29.76 

30.76 


THE OLD Vl^XINIST , CENTRAL PAPJC V/EST, painting by Childe Hassam 
THE BASILICIA AT LYON , painting by Maurice Utrillo 
Lent by Mrs. Ursula Cole Castle 

MOTHER AND TUO CHILDPJSN , painting by Mary Cassatt 

WOmi AND CHILD PEEPING WATERFQV/L , painting by Claude Monet 

STREET SCENE , painting by Maurice Utrillo 

ORCHARD AT PONTOISE , painting by Paul Cezanne 

Lent Anonymously 

NATURE DANCE , laminated wood sculpture, by Ray Sells 
V/OOD SPIRIT ” ” 

CELESTIAL STAGES ” " 

MORI^IING OVERTONS ” ” 

CRYSTAL FIRE ” ” 

Untitled, bi-pyramid ” '' 

Untitled, circled fonn " ” 

Untitled, flowering fra " ” 

CROSS ROAD ” ” 

DIAiMOND CENTER ” ” 

ASPARAS ” ” 

SEA AURA ” ” 

ASCENDING " " 

BI-PYRAIgP CONSTRUCTION ^' ” 

LANDSIAPE ” ” 

All of the above lent by the Artist for Exhibition, except 
f/U., Lent by The City of San Francisco 
5^3 1 Lent by Mr. 8c Mrs. David P, Marin 
REFLECTION , e telling, by Dale Erickson 

CONTROL TOV.rSR, colored pencil 8c graphite dra^^dng, by Erickson 
TRAPPED SHEET ” " 

AN OBJECT TPJIPPSD IN ITS OVJN SPACE " ” 

AN OBJECT SUSPENDED FROM ITS EfP/IROMENT ” ” 

AN IMAGE TRAPPED IN ITS OVHI ENIGMA " ” 

SELF ENCOUI'ITER " ” 

RETAINED GRID '' ” 

EIGHT POINTS OF OPPOSITE TENSION ” ” 

DRH^ED FOPil STUDY #1 ” ” 

DRAPED FORM STUDY #2 " ” 

DRAPED FOR14 STUDY ” 

INNER COSMOS '' ” 

SHEET IN BONDAGE " ” 

TOTEi4 ” " 

All of the above Lent by the Artist, for Exhibition 
MAN IVITH A HOE , painting by Millet 
Lent Anonymously 

PORTEPuS CARRYING SACRIFICES , Ancient Egyptian relief 

Lent Anonymously for Possible Purchase 

ST. BARBARA , French 15th Cen. sculpture 

Lent Anonymously as Proposed Gift 

DANCER PUTTING ON SLIPPER, painting by Forain 

Lent Anonymously 


- 70 - 


Air^PENDIX III - 6 


Loand FROM The California Palace of the Lepton of Honor 


1975.7 BUST OF MILTON , bronze 
by Carrier-Belleuse 


TO: PhoendLx Art IlTiseum (Arizona) 
FOR: Extended Loan, 3/26-11/4/75 


1941. 34. 10 MASK OF THE MAN V/ITH A BROKEN 
NOSE , bronze by Rodin 


1975.5.18 BUCK DEER , bronze, and 

1975.5.19 DOE , bronze, and 
1975.5.21 BUST OF HELENE IRIVIN FAGAN 

marble, by Elie Nadelman 


1941.26 PORTRAIT OF THE ARTISTES 

DAUGHTER , by Carolus-Duran 
1966.41 NEGRESS , ptg. by Thomas EakLns 

1974.9 YOIRTG GIRL WALICENG IN WATER 

bronze by Aristide r4aillol 


TO: Fogg Art Museum, Harvard Univer- 
sity, Cambridge, Mass. 

FOR: METAMORPHOSES IN 19th CENTURY 
SCULPTURE, 11 / 19 / 75 - 1 / 7 / 7 ^ 

TO: Whitney Museum of American Art, 

N.Y.C. 

FOR: THE SCULPTURE AND DRAba:NGS OF 
ELIE NADELMAN , 9/23-11/30/75 
AND: The Hirshhom Museum, V/ashington, 
D. C., I 2 /I 8 / 75 - 2 A 5/76 

TO: San Jose (Calif.) Museum of Art 
FOR: AI-IERICAITS ABROAD: PAINTERS OF 
THE VI^RIAN ERA , 12 / 16 / 75 - 1 / 10/76 

TO: The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 
New York, 

FOR: ARISTIDE MAILLOL , 12/19/75-3/21/7C 


Tlieater 8c Dance Collection Sctil-ptures: 

T8cD 19^2.134 FAiW ELSSLER , by Barre 

T8cD1962,150 VOLINII-IE , by de Boulogne 
T8cD1962.147 KARSAVINA 8c NIJINSKY , and 
T8cD1962.148 SPESSIVTZEVA 8c LIFAR , and 
T8cD1962.149 PAVLOVA & VLADIMTROFF , by 
Maurice Charpentier-Mio 
1959.62 PAVLOVA 8c MORDKIN-BACCHANALE , 
T8cD1962.139 PAVLOVA 8c MORDUN-LA PERI , and 
1959.72 PAVLOVA-LA GAVOTTE , by 


TO: The Society of the Four Arts, 
Palm Beach, Florida 
FOR: THE GOLDEN AGE OF BALLET DESIGN , 
2/6-3/7/76 

(with 75 framed works on paper lent 
by the Print 8c Drawing Department) 

and 


Malvina Hoffman 

1959.75 PAVLOVA-SWAN LAKE , and 

1959.76 NIJINSKY-LE CAPilAVAL , and 

1959.77 FOKirR:-LE CAR-IAVAL , by 


Emanuel Rosales 


T 8 CDI 962 .I 29 ICARSAITENA , and 
T8cDl962.130 PAVLOVA-GISELLE . and 
T8 cD 1962.132 PAVLOVA-BACCRiNALE , and 
T8J)1962.143 KARS AVINA-PETROUCHKA , by 
Seraphin Soudbinin 

T8eD1962.l45 PAVLOVA , by Paul Troubetzkoy 
T8J}1962.128 YVETTE CHATTRCRE , by Hubert Yencesse 


1961.10 

1928.39 

1956.20 

1936.5 


LANDSCAPE IN JURA , painting 
by Gustave Courbet 
VALMO^EDOIS , painting by 
Charles Daubigny 


TO: M.H. de Young Memorial Museum, S.F, 
FOR; AMERICAN ART, AN EXHIBITION FROM 
THE COLLEC-TION OF MR. & MRS. JOHN D . 

ROCKEFELLER 3RD , 4^7-87^5/7^ 


BACCHANTE ASSISE , painting by TO: The National Gallery of Art, 
Elizabeth Vigee-Lebrun Washington, D.C. 

BUST OF BUFFON , sc\ilpture by FOR: THE EYE OF THOMAS JEFFERSON , 
J, A. Houdon 


- 71 - 


APPEMDIX in - 7 


1963.20 

1964.1 

1952.77 

1950,9 


1926.21 

1940,50 

1940,35 

1939.4 

1943.303 

1957.139 

1966, 4 (A) 
1957.158 

1942,33 


1951.25 

1924.125 


1962.55 

1962.21 


SUMMER HOUSE ON THE BOSPHORUS 

by Theodore Frere 
Vim OF MONT ST. MICHEL , by 
William Stanley Has el tine 
THE SINGEL, AMSTEPDAM . by 
Gerrit Bercldieyde 

LA PEINTURE , painting by 
Carle Van Loo 


TO: Pyramid Gallery, Transamerica Bldg 
FOR: THE ART OF TRAVEL , organized by 
ilrt Programs, Inc., 5/3-6/2/76 
(with paintings from the de Young 
collections) 

TO: The Toledo Museum of Art (Ohio) 
FOR: THE AGE OF LOUIS XV, 1710-1774 
10/24-12/7/1975 

ALID: The Art Inst, of Chicago (111.) 

6AI-2/12/1976 

AND: The National Gallery of Canada, 
Ottawa, Ontario, 3/21-5/2/1976 
(xvith de Young collection paintings) 


ON THE BEACH , painting 
by Joachim Sorolla y Bastida 
THE POOL , painting by 
Jacob Ruisdael 
ROMAN RUINS WITH FIGURES 
ptg by G, P. Panninl 
RIALTO BRIDGE , painting by 
Francesco Guardi 
WALL BRACKETS . Pair, French, : 
CHEST , French, l6th Cen. 
CABII'IET . Modern, mahoganny 
TABLE , Spanish, l6th Cen. 

A VISIT TO GRAI-IDPA , painting 
by Charles Christian Nahl 


TO: Office of the Mayor, City Hall, 
San Francisco, 5/14/76 — 

FOR: Extended Loan, Renev/able Yearly 
(’;d.th de Young collection paint- 
ings and furniture) 


TO; E. B, Crocker Art Gallery, 
Sacramento, California 
FOR: CHARLES CHRISTTATJ NAHL: GOLD 
RUSH ARTIST , 7AO-8/29/1976 
(with de Young Collection paintings) 


THE BRIDGE , painting by 
Henri Le Sidaner 

LEFT FOOT , bronze by 
Arthur Putnam 


TO: Delav/are Art Center, Wilmington 
FOR: THE PRE-RAPHAELITE ERA ; 

1848-1905 . 4 / 12 / 6 / 6 A 976 

10; Art School, Downtown Center of 
the de Your-g Museum 
FOR: IKE GREAT AMERICAN FOOT SHOW 
7/5-8/15/1976' " 


FOREST SCENE . 

HARVEST TIME . 

William Hahn 


painting by 


painting by 


TO: The San Francisco Museum of Modern 
Art. 6AO/8A5/1976 
FOR: THE FAUVES , Introductory Gallery 

TO: Haags Gemeentemuseum, The Nether- 
lands, 3/12-4A5/1976 
AND: Kunsthaus, Zurich, Sivitzerland, 

6/17-8/8/1976 

FOR: FRONTIER AMERICA: THE FAR V/EST , 
1 / 23/75 1 continuing exhibition circu- 
lated by The Museum of Fine Arts, 
Boston, 


- 72 




APPEI'IDIX IV 


PROGRAi^ OFFICE 

EXHIBITION-RELATED PROGRAI4S Arfl) EVENTS 


7-2-75 

Earth, Fire, V/ater 

Preivew 

7-6 

Earth, Fire, V/ater 

Poetry Reading - ’’The Quetzal" 

7-27 

Earth, Fire, l/ater 

Fr'Jjn: Maya Through the Ages 

7-27, 28 

Egyptian (Chinese) 

Members Reception 

9-7 

Earth, Fire, Water 

Family Picnic 

9-13 

Hooven 

Reception 

9-26 

Egyptian 

Lecture 

9-2S, 29 

Egyptian 

Lecture: Bernard Bothraer 

10-4, 5 

Calligraphy 

Lecture 

10-11 

l7omen Artists 

Opening Day-Slide talk: Karen V/ilson Sc 

J.J* Peterson; Chamber Music; V/heels; 



Jazz: BeBe K’ Roche 

10-18 

Christo 

Talk: An Afternoon vd-th Christo 

11-1 

Women Artists 

Slide Talk: Sandra Roos 

11-2 

V/omen Artists 

Poetry Reading: Contemporary Women Poets 

11-P 

V/omen Artists 

Theatre: Berkeley V/omens Theatre Ensemble 

11-9 

V/omen Artists 

Slide Talk: Patricia Tavener 

11-16 

V/omen Artists 

Meeting of V/omens Caucus for Art 

11-16 

Clayton Bailey 

"Meet the Artist" 

11-18 

Light Line 

Preview 

11-30 

Earth , Firs , V/ater 

Morning Glory Theatre 

12-5 

Food Show 

Reception 

1-9-76 

Chahine 

Reception 

1-16 

Cremean 

Reception 

1-22 

Norton Simon 

Reception 

2-12 . 

Orange Crate Label 

Reception 

3-19, 23 

Hermitage 

Slide talk: Itlldred Campbell 

3-21 

Hermitage 

Preview 

3-25-26 

Hermitage 

Previex^ 

4-17 

American Art 

Opening Day 

4-19 

American Art 

American Sampler (A.S.) Preview 

4-21 

American Art 

Reception 

4-24,26 

American Art 

A,S,: Three Artists in Colonial Boston 

4-29-30 

American Art 

Members Reception 

5-1,3 

American Art 

A,S,: V/hat’s American About an American? 

5-8,10 

American Art 

A.S,: A New Landscape 

5-15-17 

American Art 

A,S,: The Things that made Americans Laugh 

5-21 

Baldwin/Earney 

Previev; 

5-24,29 

American Art 

A,S,: Anerican Artists Abroad 

6-5,7 

American Art 

A.S,; Divas of the Golden V/est 

6-12,24 

American Art 

A.S,: Gentility and the Age of Innocence 

6-20 

Ray Sells 

Opening 

6-25 

Dale Erikson 

Opening 

P-vlLIGHT 

CONCERTS 



7-20-75f 7-30-75, 8-5-75, 5-13-76, 5-30,76 San Francisco Chanber Orchestra 


- 73 


APPErroiX IV - 2 


PKOGKAJI OFFICE (Continued) 
V.IIIKEND PERFOEMIPC APTS 


-5-75 


Cliildren’s Films Series: Kinp:dom of the Crooked Mirrors , 
The Red Balloon 


7-12 

Cliildren’s 

Films 

Series: 

The Fabulous Baron Munchausen 





TTie Steadfast Tin Soldier 

7-19 

Children's 

Films 

Series: 

The Robot 

The Adventures of Nils 

7-26 

Children' s 

Films 

Series: 

Rocket to Nov/here 





The Seven Arts 


9 - 20,21 

9 - 27,28 

10-4,5 

10-18,19 

10 - 25,26 


Tlie Pyramids - The Music of Ackamoor 
Raymond Savryer Afro-American Dance Co. 

Hoo Doo 8e The Pliythm Devils - Music 
Isvani S: Hie Dance Hieatre of Om 
Ali Akbar School of Music, Orchestra 8c Dancers 


1-31,2-1-76 Dance Series: V/estv/ind International Folk Ensemble 


2 - 7,8 

2-14,15 

2 - 21,22 

2- 28,29 

3- 6,7 
3-13,14 
3 - 20,21 

3- 27,28 

4- 3,4 
6 - 19,20 


Dance Seizes: San Francisco Dance Spectrum 
Dance Series: Shawl- Anderson Modern Dance Company 
Dance Series: Gwen Levri.s-Afro American Dance Company 
Dance Series: Players 
Picinist Jerome Malry 
Opera: '"Hie Prima Donna" 

Flutist, Mong Pil ICin 
Guitarist, Spencer Burleson 
Pianist, Pola Baytelman 

The Composers Cooperative 

OTHER PERFOPJ-fENG ARTS AMD SPECIAL EVEMTS 

7-14,15,1^, The American Conservatory Theatre - Young Conservatory 

17,18 

7- 17 Lecture: Richard Fozzd.ni 

8- 2 U.C, Extension Rodin Seminar 

10-14,15 Tapestry Conservation Class 

10- 17 San Francisco Conservatory Orchestra Concert 

11- 7 Eleanor Antin - Conceptual Artist 

11-12 Lecture for Museum Auxiliary 

11-13,14, 15, The Barrister's Club - The Trial of Sherlock Holmes 

20,21,22 

11-16 Jeannette Morris Recital 

11- 29 Smithsonian Institution: "Music in the Age of Jefferson" 

Lecture by Paul Karlstrora 

12- 7,10,12, Puppet Show: This Night of all the Year 

13,14,17,19, 

20,21,22,23,24 


2- 23 

3- 11 

4- 19,20 
4-30 


John Hayx'/ard - Lecture on Renaissance Goldsmiths 
Yale Chamber Players 

Docent Cotincil; Reception (Hermitage) 


- 74 - 


APPENDIX IV - 3 


PPOGPJUM OFFICE (Continued) 

OTHER PERFORMING AF.TS MD SPECIAL EVET^ITS (Continued) 


5-6 American Federation of Arts Trustees Dinner 

5-8 Ceramic Circle Lecture 

5- 22 U,C, Extension Seminar for American Art 

6- 2 Berkeley Cliamber Players 

6-2 Lecture to Auxiliary by V/anda Corn 
6-20 Ilills College; Lecture and Reception 


In addition over 20 outside groups - from the Harvard Class of 1951 to 
the Ethiopian Consulate - used facilities and rooms in the Museums for 
their events in 1975-1976. 


- 75 - 



/iPPENDIX V 


DOCETIT CCUIICIL 


Docent Council Personnel and Tour Statistics 

A, Total number of active docents 238 

A.O.A. 56 

Asian 90 

V/estern 79 

V/estern School 13 

Total number of Supporting docents 8? 

Total number of Docent Council 

Membership 325 

B, Total number of tours given in the 

Asian Art Museum and The Fine Arts Museums 
Total audience 

1975-1976 breakdoivn of figures ' : 

1. Asian Art Museum of San Francisco 
Tours 

Total audience 

2. The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco 
Tours 

Total audience 

a, M, H. de Young - Galleries of the 
Traditional Arts of Africa, Oceania 
8c the Americas 

Tours 

Total audience 

b, M, H, de Yoimg 8c Legion of Honor - 
Galleries of European and American Art 

Tours 

Total Audience 

3. Tour statistics for programs functioning in 
both The Asian Art Museum and The Fine Arts 
Museums 

a. Docents for the Deaf Program 
Active docents; 10 
Tours (12 adult 8c 15 school) 

Total audience 


1975-1976 

3,535 

42,504 

1974-1975 

5,950 

63,436 

1,369 

13,199 

1,587 

21,225 

1,957 

28,245 

2,015 

33,424 

468 

5,848 

344 

3,274 

1974-1975 
deYouns: Lefjion 

1,469 820 o51 

24,397 16,662 13,488 


27 60 

1,060 1,282 


- 76 - 


APPENDIX V - 2 

DOCENT COIDICIL STATISTICS (Continued) 

School Program Personnel and Tour Statistics 

A. School tours in the Asian Art Museum 

2 tours offered a week 

13 school docents each giving a tour a week 

total number of school tours 62 

total student audience 2327 

B. School tours in American and European art galleries of 

Hie Fine Arts Museijms 

3 tours offered a week 

19 school docents each giving a tour a week 

total number of school tours 80 

total student audience 2912 

C. School tours in The Traditional Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the 

Americas at The Fine Arts Museums 

3 tours a week 

l8 school docents giving a tour a week 

total number of school tours 103 

total student audience 2626 


- 77 


APPENDIX VI 


THE DE YOUNG MUSEUI''! APT SCHOOL 


PERSONNEL July 1, 1975 - June 30, 1976 


Elsa Cameron 
Richard Fong 
Kathy Oliva 
John Chiu 
Jim Stevenson 
Shelley Dov/ell 

Eileen Lew 
liLchael Chin 
Tom Gates 
Michael Lerner 
Larry Lippold 
Joel V/eeden 
Genevieve Jelinsky 
Marylou Peacock 
Ludwig Pick 
Palntinp: and Drawing 


Textiles 


Film and Video 


Photography 


Printmaking and Graphics 


Metal Arts 


Curator-in-Charge 
Associate Curator 
Assistant Curator to January 1976 
Assistant Curator 

Senior Curatorial Assistant, Art Classes 
Curatorial Assistant, Aide to the Curator-in-Charge/ 
CETA Program 

Curatorial Assistant, Trip-out Truck 
Administrative Assistant, Ro eke fell er/NEA Interns 
Dept* Chairman, Art History, Librarian of Slides 
Film and Video Programs 

Registrar, Community Worker, Dovmtoxm Art Center 

Preparator, Community V/orker, Dov/ntown Art Center 

Executive Secretary 

Art School Registrar to November 1975 

Fiscal Officer 

Leonard Silverberg, Department Chairm.an 

Michael Cookinhara, Curatorial Aide 

Jerry Concha, Curatorial Aide 

Erica Golden, Curatorial Aide 

Ralph Hilton, Curatorial Aide 

John Chiu, Assistant Curator 

Aung Taik, Curatorial Aide, Graphic Design 

Anne Wilson, Chairman 

John V/ilson, Curat oriel. Aide 

Marjorie Snow 

Shelley Jakobsen 

Michael Lerner, Chairman 

Alan Babbitt from April 1976 

Michael McMillan 

VAiitman McGowan (December 1975 to April 1976) 

John Finedman, Chairman 
Robert Hsiang, Curatorial Aide 
Larry Lippold, Chairman 
Sel^^^yn Jones, Curatorial Aide 
Jack Loo, Curatorial Aide 
Josie Grant, Curatorial Aide 
Donna Seid, Chairman 
Clifford Benshoof 
Janet Tyne, Curatorial Aide 


- 78 - 


APPEl'IDIX VI - 2 


THE DE Y0W:G MUSEUII APT SCHOOL 
PERSOMMEL (Continued) 


Ceramics Jim Stevenson, Chairman 

Richard Fong 

Tad Selcino, Curatorial Aide 

Muralists John Rarapley, Curatorial Aide 

John V/ehrle, Curatorial Aide 
Josie Grant, Curatorial Aide 
Trin-out Truck and Children *s Program 


John Chiu 
Tad Sekino 
Jack Loo 
Eileen Lew 
Janet Tyne 

Ro eke feller /OJEA Training Felloi'js in 


John l'7ilson 
Joel V/eeden 
Aung Talk 
Calvin Tanura 
Ralph Hilton 

Education and Arts Administration 


Michael Chin, Coordinator 
Cleveland Bellow Sally Casler 
I'/anda Chin Masashi Matsimoto 

Terry Dickey Merlee Markishtum 

Peggy Gronner Leon Quinton 

Mary Stofflet 


- 79 - 


A?pnn:i:: • 


REVEirUE AIID SIS^EIIL'ITUKS STATEIEEIIT 

Iluseuras Adrxiission Fimd 

December 2, 1975 through June 30 j 1976 


Hevenue 


December 1975 
January 1976 
February 1976 
March 1976 
April 1976 
May 1976 
June 1976 


Total Revenue 


Ex-penrlitures 


Holiday Pay 
Salaries 

Contractual Ser‘'/ices 
Material 8c Supplies 
Equipment 
Improvements 
Change Fund 
Other Expenses 


20,377.35 

20,615.89 

21,716.60 

24,737.80 

23,985.25 

45,019.20 

28,951.29 


128.08 

20,294.16 

2,453.62 

6,919.80 

5,578.14 

5 , 000.00 

1,000.00 

1 , 100.00 


Total Expenditures per Controller’s 
Statement, June 30, 1976 


Eivcess of Revenues over Expenditures 


Less; Specific amount of guarantee (G, L, 1195) 
to Hoard of Trustees’ Resolution No. 33 


^^ 185 , 403.33 


42,473. 80 


$142,929.53 


$ ^ 4,000.00 


Amount transferred to Admission Trust Fund 

(Controller’s Reserve G, L, I 780 ) $ 48,929.53 


- 80 - 


APPENDIX VII - 2 


ACTIIC 


Tile Fine Arts Museums Foundation 


Grants Av/arded for Fir-cal Year 1975-76 


Grants and Pror:rams 

Period of Support 

Amount Av/arded 

R-50-41-230 

As l/e '.'are, As Me Are 

MEA: Visual Arts, Photo Aid 

11/1/73-10/31/76 

S 8,000 

R-50-20-93 

Flemish Painting Catalogue 

MSA; Museum Program, Catalogue 

1/1/76-6/30/77 

20,000 

R-60-20-239 

Tapestry Catalogue 

riiHA: Museum Program, Catalogue 

12A/73-9-20-76 

23,010 

R-60-20-125 

Tapestry Exhibition 

NSA: Museum Program 

2/10/76-2/10/77 

14,350 

R-5C-20-173B 

Rocke'fellen Exi icition 

NEA: Museum Program 

1/1/76-12/31/76 

20,000 

R60-20-371B 
de Yoting Renovation 

NEA: Museum Program, Reno. 

1/1/76-12/31/76 

159,030 

Rockefeller Exhibition 

Brochure 

flEH: A.merican Issues Forum 

7A/75-6/30/76 

6,500 

Rodin Catalogue 

Ford Foundation 

1975-6/77 

19,925 

French Dravri.ngs Catalogue 

Ford Foundation 

1975-6/77 

19,460 

r_60-20-277 

Museum Training Program 

NEA: Museum Program 

llA/75-9/31/76 

25,000 

Museum Interns 

Rockefeller 

9/1/7598/31/76 

■.33,900 

Museum Interns 


l30,000 


Rockefeller 1976-1978 

Total Funds Awarded: S579?175 


- 81 - 


APPEI'IDIX VII - 3 


Grants Av;arded for ProgrraTiS Prior to Fiscr.l Year 197 >-76 


Grants and Pro^crans 

Period of Sunnort 

Amount Av;arded 

P40-20-39 

French Drawings Catalogue 

NEA: Museum Program, Catalogue 

6/1/74-6/30/77 

20,000 

A40-20-331 

Rodin Sculp tTire Catalogi.ie 

NEA: Museum Program, Catalogue 

6/1/74-6/30/77 

20,000 

R50-20-271B 

Security-Roll-down Doors 

NEA: Museum Program, Renovation 

3/1/73-12/31/76 

3,023 

A30-44-1 

Security (Legion of Honor) 

NEA: Museum Program, Renovation 

7/1/72-12/31/76 

30,000 

A72-O-985 

Security (de Young) 

NEA: Museum Program, Renovation 

6/1/72-12/31/76 

30,000 

A4o-20-4B 

BAACL 

MEA: Conservation 

1973-6/76 

40,000 


Total Funds: 'Sl^O^OkO 


- 82 - 


APPENDIX VII - 4 


Grants Av/arded for Projects Ber:;inninf:!: After Fiscal Year 1973-76 


Grants and ?ror:rar;.s 


Period of Sun-oort Araoimt Av/arded 


A40-20-331 

Podin Sculpture Catalogue 

MSA: Museum Program, Catalogue 

6/1/74-6/30/77 

4 20,000 

R-60-20-32 

Triimiph of Hiunarnsm 

NEA: Museum Program 

9/1/76-12/31/77 

20,130 

As Me V/ere, As V/e Are 

MSA: Musevim Program, ’.7AM 

11/1/76-10/30/77 

14,500 

American Galleries 

I'lEA: Visiting Specialist 

Museum Program 

7/1/76-1/31/77 

9,074 

In-Gallery Lighting (CPLH) 

NEA: Museum Program 

Emergency Funding 

7A/76-12/31/76 

8,278.20 

P5C-3^-30 

Trip-Out Trucks 
riSA: Special Projects 

1/1/75-6/30/76 

17,015 

Slimmer Interns 

IHA; Expansion Arts 

7A/76-8/31/76 

5,000 

Video/Film Project 

7/1/76-6/30/77 

10,110 


NEA: Musetun Program, l/AI-'I 
Total Funds: S67,092 

Total Funds for 23 Active Grants; 4826,307 


- 83 - 


APPEIIDIX VII ~ 5 


The foUoxdLng is a list of Pending Grant Proposals 


Proposed Grant and Program P.eauested Period of Support Peauested Amount 


Library re cataloguing 

NEA: Museum Program 

General Programs 

lA/77-12/31/77 

Textile Conservator 

NEA: Museum Program 

Visiting Specialist 

IOA/76-9/30/77 

American Galleries, 
Installation 

I'lEA: Museum Program, 
Utilization 

11/1/76-10/31/77 

Museum Training 
Administration 

NEA; Museum Program 

1/1/77-12/31/76 

Conservation-Deco, Arts 
Master Apprenticeship 

NEA; Museum Program 

1/1/77-12/31/76 


15,739 

9,030 

30,000 

11,000 

11,000 


de YoLinp: Museum Art School 


Museum Training 
NEA: Museum Program 


1/1/77-12/31/77 


28,000 


Appendix yni 


Board of Trustees - Delores C, Malone, Secretar;’/' 

Pe-elected 

Mrs. Agnes -\lbert 10-23-76 

Joseph M, Bransten 10-23-76 

Sheldon G, Cooper 10-23-76 

Christian de Guigne III 10-23-76 

Cyril ilagnin 10-23-76 

V/alter Nevnaan 10-23-76 

Zlected 

Charles L, Gould 10-23-76 

George D, Hart 10-23-76 

Death of Former Board President 

V/illian Doss Wallace, Jr, 2-28-76 

Death of Trustee 

StarJ.ey Dollar, Jr. 11-17-75 

?-e5ig:nation 

Mrs, Robert V/att Miller 6-24-76 


- 85 - 


.^ppEiroix IX 


THE SOCISTY 

I, Personnel Ap-nointnients (Museum Society Staff ) 

Louise Ann Ifezzetti appointed Membership Assistant, July l6, 1975 
Nicholas Watson appointed A.ssistant to the de Young Bookshop Manager, 
October l6, 1975 *. 

II. Membership 


Individual Memberships, as of June 30 , 1976 


Category and dues 

Junior (t^lO) 

1,331 

Senior ($? 10 ) 

2,591 

Active (^J 20 ) 

11,218 

Contributing (^^ 30 ) 

1,982 

Sustaining Q 50 ) 

679 

Supporting (^ 100 ) 

231 

Donor (S 250 ) 

20 

Sponsor (S 500 ) 

8 

Guarantor (4^1,000) 

5 

Life/Benefactor (one-time payment of (^ 5 C 0 and up) 62 

Patron ((^ 1 , 000 /year for 10 years) 


Total paid memberships: 

18,172 

Honorary Members 

4 

Complimentary Members 

132 

Total membership: 

18,308' 

Corporate Memberships, as of June 30 , 1976 

Corporate dues are determined by the number of 

the firm’s 

employees v;ithin the r-ine Bay Anea counties: 

25 employees or less S250 ar 

inually 

26 to ICO employees S 500 ar 

inually 

Over 100 employees 91,000 annually 

Name of firm 

Annual dues 

American Potato Co, 

9500 

Bank of America Foundation 

1,000 

Bechtel Corporation 

1,000 

Edv;ard A. Bonnelli & Associates 

250 

Booz, Allen 8c Hamilton, Inc, 

250 

Bronson, Bronson 8c McKinnon 

250 

Bryan International Travel, Inc, 

250 

Castle 8c Cooke, Inc, 

1,000 

Coldwell Banker Co, 

250 

Coopers 8c Lybrand 

1,000 

H,S, Crocker Co,, Inc, 

250 

Crocker National Bank 

1,000 

Dodge 8c Cox 

250 

Fireman's Fund American Insurance Co, 

1,000 

Flax’s 

250 


- 86 - 


APPSI-IDIX IX - 2 


THE MUSEUM SOCIETY (Continued) 


Corporate Memberships (Continued) 


Name of firm Annual dues 

Industrial Indemnity Co. Si, COO 

Marsh & McLennan, Inc. 1,000 

McICinsey & Co , , Inc • 250 

Natomas Company 1 , 000 

Pacific Gas & Electric 1,000 

Damon Reike & Company ICO 

Retail Dry Goods Association of San Francisco 1,000 

Rosenberg Capital Management 250 

Security Pacific National Bank 1,000 

Skidmore, 0\vings Sc Merrill 1,C00 

Spreckels Sugar Division, Amstar Corp, 1,000 

Standard Oil of California 1,000 

States Steamship Co. 1,000 

Stauffer Chemical Co. 1,000 

Syntax Corporation ' 1,0C0 

Transamerica Corporation 1,000 

Union Sugar Division, Consolidated Foods Co. 250 

United California Bank 1,000 

Vestaur Corporation 250 

V/ells Fargo Bank 1,000 

Uilbur-Ellis/Coruiell Bros, 1,000 

Dean V/itter & Co, 1,000 

Arthur Young & Co, 500 


III. EVENTS SPONSORED BY THE I-’IDSEUM SOCIETY 


A, Performing Arts 

'ieekend Performing Arts programs Saturday and Sunday 

de Young and Legion of Honor afternoons 

A continuing series of v;eekend programs of 
music, dance, drama, poetry readings and lectures 


Stmiraer T-^/i.li.?ht Concerts 

Legion of Honor 

San Francisco Cnamber Orchestra, Edgar J. Braun, conductor. 


1975 - 76 season 

Bruce Freifeld, violinist; Rolf Storseth, cellist 
Roxanne Clshausen, harpist; Roxanne Michaelian, 
pianist 

Eriko Sato, violinist; Lorene Adams, soprano 

1976 - 77 season 

Works by Copland, Haydn and Mozart 
V/orks by C.P.E, Bach, Mendelssohn, Mozart and 
Purcell. 

This Night of All the Year 

Legion of Honor 

A celebration of a Victorian Christmas Eve, 
using rod puppets and music, produced and 
directed by C, R, Figtree and Bruce D, Schv;artz. 

- 87 - 


July 20, 1975 
July 31 , 1975 

August 5, 1975 

Hay 13 , 1976 
May 30 , 1976 

Dec. 5-24, 1975 


APPEI'IDi: 


THE MUSEUT4 SOCIETY (Continued) 

B, Films 

International Children’s Film Festival 

Legion of Honor 

"The Kingdom of the Crooked Mirrors" (USSR) 
and "The Red Balloon" (France). 

"The Fabulous Baron MUnchausen" (Czechoslovakia) 
and "The Steadfast Soldier" (Denmark), 

"The Adventures of Mils" (Sweden) and 
"Hie Robot" (USA) 

"Rocket to Nowhere" (Czechoslovakia) and 
"The Seven Arts" (Rouraania) . 

C, Lectures 

Professor Bernard V, Bothmer on "The Art and 
Archaeology of Ancient Egypt;" de Young Museum; 
open to the public. 

John F, Hayward on "Renaissance Goldsmiths"; 
de Young Museum (afternoon) ; members only, 

D, Members * Events 

Champagne Evenings in honor of "Images for Eternity" 
at the de Young and the Chinese Archaeological 
exhibition at the Asian Art Museum. 

Family Holiday Party for members and their 
children; de Young Museum, 

Members ^ Tea following lecture by John F, Hay’.-zard 
on "Renaissance Goldsmiths"; de Young Museum. 

Members* Previev/ Party for Treasure Hunt Auction, 
a fund-raising event sponsored by The Museum Society 
Auxiliary; Butterfield & Butterfield Warehouse. 

Upper Category Members* Reception (Sustaining and 
above) in connection vm.th the Hermitage exhibition; 
Legion of Honor. 

Upper Catep:ory Members* Reception (Sustaining and 
above) in connection vm.th the Rockefeller exhibition; 
de Young Museum. 

Champagne Evenings in connection >nLth the Rocke- 
feller exhibition; de Yoimg Museum. 


July 5, 1975 
July 12, 1975 
July 19, 1975 
July 26, 1975 

Sept. 28 8c 29, 
1975 

Feb. 23, 1976 

July 27 & 23, 
1975 

Dec. 14, 1975 
Feb. 23, 1976 
Feb. 25, 1976 

March 25, 1976 

April 21, 1976 

April 29 Se 30, 
1975 


APPENDIX IX - 4 


THE MUSEUIl SOCIETY (Continued) 

E, Special Events (non-member ) 

Second .Annual Family Picnic - Legion of Honor; 
open to the public. 

Reception in honor of Mr, and Mrs, Norton Simon, 

in connection \-ri.th the re-installation of the 
collections of the Norton Simon Foundations; 

Legion of Honor. 

Previev; Reception hosted by the Consul General of 
the USSR and the Board of Trustees in honor of the 
Hermitage exliibition; Legion of Honor, 

Dinner in honor of Mr, and Mrs, John D . 

Rockefeller 3 rd given by the Alcoa Foundation and 
the Board of Trustees in connection vri.th the 
Rockefeller exhibition. The dinner v/as funded by 
the Alcoa Foundation, de Young Museum, 

Luncheon for former Directors of The Museum Society, 
follov/ing the Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors 
Legion of Honor, 

F, Travel 

Rhine Discovery Tour 

Tour included stops in Luzern and Bruxelles as 
v/ell as four days cruising doxm the Rhine, 

27 participants, 

Scythian Gold Tour 

Day trip to Los Angeles County Museum of Art to 
viev; the exliibition "The Land of the Scythians," 

66 participants, 

Chyter Flight to Paris, return from London. 

176 participants. 

" Splendours of Antiquity " 

Tour through Turkey, Iran, T.ebauon, Syria and 
SgyP't* 29 participants. 

Day Art Tour to the Peninsula to view the private 
collection of Mr, and Mrs. Harry V/, Anderson and 
to visit the Rodin Collection at the Stanford 
University Museum, 42 participants, 

California Museum Tour 

Trip to Kearst Castle, the Santa Barbara Museum 
of Art, the J, Paul Getty Museum and the Norton 
Simon Museum of Art in Pasadena, 38 participants. 


Sept. 7 , 1975 
Jan. 22 , 1976 

Mar. 24 , 1976 

Apr. 20 , 1976 

May 17 , 1976 

July 25 - 
Aug. 7 , 1975 

Aug. 20 , 1975 

Sept, l 4 - 
Oct. 12 , 1975 

Oct, 4 - 
Nov. 3 , 1975 

Oct. 15, 1975 

May 18-20, 1976 


- 89 - 


APPE^IDIX IX - 5 

THE lOTSEUT'I SOCIETY (Continued) 

G, Publications 

Fire, Earth and V/ater: Sculpture from the Land Collection of 

Mesoamerican Art by Jane P# IHvyer and Edxirard B. Dwyer, a catalogue 
to accorapany the exhibition at the Legion of Honor, July V-Dec, 7» 1975. 

Pobert Cremean: Two Sculntures - ’’Homage to Paul Apostle" and 

"Vatican Corridor ," a portfolio of photographs, v/ith an introduction 
by Thomas Garver, to accorapany the exhibition at the de Young Museirai, 
January 17-March l4, 1976. 

Three Centuries of French Art, Volurae II; Selections from The Norton 

Simon, Inc. Museum of Art and the Norton Simon Foundation, edited by 

F. Lanier Graham, to accorapany the re-installation of the loan exhibition 
at the Legion of Honor, Jan. 22- June 27 j 1976. 

American Art: An Exhibition from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. 

John D» Rockefeller 3nd by E, P, Richardson, a catalogue to accorapany 

the exhibition at the de Young Museum, Apr. 17- Aug. 15 j 1976. 

Museum Calendar , issued monthly to Museum Society members and a 
selected list of schools and other institutions. 


IV. ECPENDITURES ON BEHALF OF THE MUSEUMS 


Director’s 1975-76 Contingency Fund: $27,000, 

1975-76 appropriation for the Asian Art Museum: Sl9j000 

de Young Museum Art School: Scholarship program: S5sOCO, 
Trip-out Truck: !wl0,000. 

Art Apprenticeship program: ^1,000. 

Education: ^45,500, 

Exhibitions: 290,023. 

A-merican V/ing: Professional ser^^ices to R. Sgherman 


and T, Seligman: $k,623» 

Salary and employee benefits to 

D. Hoopes (see belov;) : 7,^51. 

Supplies : 293 , 

American V/ing Total: $12,37^. 


Expenses for flower arrangements and plant care at the de Young 
Museum: Si, 3^3. 

Retainer fee for Donald L, Blum for public relations services for 
Museum Society-sponsored exhibitions and events: S3i600. 


- 90 - 


TliE MU3EL7I SOCIETY (Continued) 


APPEI'IDIX IX - 6 


IV. ECPETIDITUKES ON BLHALE OF THE MUSEUI'IS (Continued): 

Gallery signing program for de Young and Legion of Honor: S845, 

New Classical Gallery, de Young Museum (partial funding): 1^3} 430. 

The salaries of the following Fine Arts Museums staff members were 
funded by The Museum Society in 1975-76. 

Kathleen Berrin, Assistant Curator, Department of Africa, Oceania and 
the Americas j effective January 2, 1976. 

Edward T, Engle, Jr., Publications Manager (part-time); effective 
April 5, 1976. 

Donelson F. Hoopes, Visiting Curator, Department of Paintings and 
Sculpture (American v/ing) ; Museum Society funding: Jan. 22-May 17, 1976 

Susan Ellen Levitin, Assistant Curator, Department of Exhibitions; 
Museum Society funding through June 30, 1976. 

Susan Melim, Assistant to Assistant Director for Administration; 
February 3 - June 30, 1976. 

P.on Pack, Graphic Designer. 

V, THE MUSELH SOCIETY AUXILIARY Chaarman; Mrs, Philip G, Greene 

Three suburban Auxiliaries have now been formed to help stimulate 
interest in the Museum Society and the Museums in these communities: 

Belvedere-'Tiburon Auxiliary: Mrs, Richard Otter, Chairman 
Hillsborough Auxiliary: Mrs. D. VJ. Furbee, Cliairman 
Ross Auxiliary: Mrs. Jason B, Tuttle, Chairman 

Four programs were held for the suburban Auxiliaries in 1975-76, 
follov;ed by luncheon for the participants; 

Sentember 26, 1975 : A lecture and gallery tour by Frank Norick on 
the exhibition "Images for Eternity: The Art of Ancient Egypt," 
de Young Museum, (Belvedere-Tiburon and Hillsborough Aioxiliaries ) 
November 12, 1975: A lecture and gallery tour by Thomas Carr Hov/e 
on "V/omen in Art," Legion of Honor. (Hillsborough Auxiliary) 

February 19 . 1976 : A lecture and gallery tour by Yvon d'Argence 
on the Jade Collection at the Asian Art Museum. (Belvedere-Tiburon 
and Hillsborough Auxiliaries) 

June 2, 1976 : A lecture and gallery tour by Professor \7anda Corn on 
"Taste, History and the Rockefeller Collection of American Art," 
de Young Museum, (Belvedere-Tiburon, Hillsborough and Ross Auxiliaries 


- 91 - 


apps^il:'IX IX - 7 

IKE MUSEUM SOCIETY (Continued) 

VI, BAY ASEA GRAPHIC APTS COUTJCIL 

Activities for EAGAC members during 1975-76 included: 

October l6, 1975 : Peception in honor of Robert Flynn Johnson, the nev/ly 
appointed Curator in Charge of the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts 
at the Legion of Honor, Mrs, Frederick VJhitridge served as chairman for 
the event, 

November 8, 1975 : Tour by Dr, Joseph Goldyne of the exliibition he organized 
at the University Art Museum, Berkeley - ”J,M,\7, Turner: V/orks on Paper 
from American Collections," 

February l4, 1976 : Exliibition tour by Robert Flynn Johnson of "Artists’ 
Portraits and Self-Portraits" in the Achenbach Foundation galleries at 
the Legion of Honor. 

May 15, 1976 : Lecture by Robert Futernick, Conservator in the Achenbach 
Conservation Laboratory, on "Simple Safeguards for Protecting V/orks of 
Art on Paper." 

May 21 , 1976 : Preview for the exhibitions "Turn of the Century American 
Posters: Arthur W, Barney Collection" and "Dravrings by Gordon Baldvan" 
in the Achenbach Foimdation galleries, 

June 5, 1976 ; Study session on Japanese Prints conducted by Roger Keyes 
in the Achenbach Foundation at the Legion of Honor, 

Jime 12, 1976 : Study session on American Prints and Drawings conducted by 
Robert Flyrji Johnson in the Achenbach Foundation. 

June 19, 1976 : Study session on Italian Drawings conducted by Dr. Joseph 
Goldyne in the Achenbach Foundation. 


- 92 - 


^ & 




t 



■i 



ANI'IUAL PxEPORT 1976-1977 


THE FINE ARTS MUSEUIIS OF SAN FRAICISCO 
M. H. de Young Memoidal Museum 
California Palace of the Legion of Honor 

Ian McKibbin li/hite 
Director of the Museums 


P.UBUIC UlSRARY 


# i 






I 

i 

i 

! 



IMDEX 


♦ 


# 




Director’s Forev/ord i 

!• Collections Division 

Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas 1 

Department of Decorative Arts 3 

Department of Painting and Sculpture 3 

Department of Prints and Drawings 7 

(Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts) 

Department of Exhibitions 8 

Temporary E^diibitions - de Young & Legion of Honor 10 

Temporary Exhibitions - Achenbach 12 

Painting Conservation l4 

Registrar - de Young Museum 15 

Registrar - Legion of Honor l6 

Library 17 

II* Education Division l8 

Public Programs 20 

Art School 24 

Docent Council 27 

Department of Interpretation 29 

Publications 33 

Volunteer Council 34 

III* Administration Division 38 

Public Information Office 39 

IV* Museum Society 4o 

APPENDICES 

Appendix I - Achenbach Foundation 45 

Appendix II - Registrar - de Young Museum 8l 

Appendix III - Registrar - Legion of Honor 69 

Appendix IV - Public Programs 79 

Appendix V - Board of Trustees 83 

Appendix VI - Museum Society 84 

Appendix VII - Museum Admissions 89 

Appendix VIII - Grants 90 



filiii 


DIKSCTOR’S rOIfflWOPJ) 


Renascent - bringing again into being or renev/ed vigor - is the word 
which to me most aptly seems to characterize this tv/elve month period of 
accomplishment. Reaffirming the principles on v/hich the Museums were 
founded, considerable funds and energy v/ere expended to restore an aging 
facility, and to consolidate the pliysical assets and organization of the 
Museums, Through this process of renewal, there are developing nev; in- 
sights and concepts of the Museum organism, • ’ 1 


The story of the restoration of the tapestry collection typified the 
renev;al process. The collection had been "hanging around" or relegated 
to storerooms for years in the de Young Museum and the Legion of Honor, 

The tii^o segments were combined for the first time and were washed 
thoroughly and restored by a group of volunteers under the guidance of 
Anna Bennett assisted by her engineer husband, Ralph, Mrs, Bennett 
published the first comprehensive catalogue of the collection. In 
celebration of the event a large group of tapestries were exhibited at 
the Legion of Honor and the first tapestry symposiimi ever held in the 
western hemisphere took place in November, After a year’s grad^iate study 
in liiurope, sponsored by the Museum, Bruce Hutchison returned to begin 
work in a newly created city position of Textile Conservator, Tliis was 
gratifying recognition by the City of the restoration of this valuable 
collection, \7ork on the tapestries is a continuous process, but now this 
team is turning its attention also to the costumes and other textiles 
owcied by the Museums, 

The de Young Museum renovation, an extensive 2,3 million dollar re- 
juvenation of the physical plant had profound effect on the Museums, 

After several years of planning, the actual construction began in the 
spring of 1976, All xrork was within the confines of the existing building 
shell; the only expansion that took place was underground. By excavating 
behind the existing Kress basement back towards Hearst Court, space was 
lorovided for a suite of conservation laboratories and greatly expanded and 
reorganized storage facilities. The whole section of the main floor level 
of the Museimi designed originally as exhibition space had been usuiped for 
various service activities. Out of this renovation came space for a new 
suite of American Galleries, a small restaurant, new bathrooms, improved 
facilities for the Art School, shipping and receiving areas, and exhibition 
preparation space. This work requ.ired a long overdue "spring cleaning". 

An accretion of clutter and objects left over from the days before the 
de Young Museum becarae an art museum, forced decisions to dispose of a 
myriad of objects. Did we really need to keep a World War I gas mask 
and pieces of shrapnel in our decorative arts collection? 

The renovation fell far short of solving all the foreseen long-range 
needs of the Museum, It had to be recognized as Ehase 1 of a 2, 3j or 4 
step process, but i^^as a substantial step forward. The space demands of 
a gro^^^ing collection of staff and volunteers were hardly solved. The exist- 
ing staff 'offices were divided and perhaps made more habitable but it 
was unfortunate that plans for toilet facilities in this area had to be 
given 1 X because of the cost of bringing drain lines and plumbing to this 




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section of the building. Rearrangements in the library have made sur- 
veillance easier for a limited staff. The valuable Archives of American 
Art facility came doivn from temporary quarters in the tower to adjoin the 
library, providing much better research and study facilities by this 
relocation. 

The American collections v;hich v/ere installed in the new American 
Galleries , as in the case of the tapestries came from the collections 
of the Legion of Honor and the de Young Museum. Not only were the paintings 
combined in this nevi permanent facility but they were exhibited along with 
American decorative arts. Corridors containing interpretive material were 
included to give museum visitors a context in which to view these \i;orlcs of 
art in a way that v/as informative ivLthout being obtrusive. 

The renovation work at the de Young Museum v;as a fitting tribute to 
Ransom M. Cook who retired in November as president of the Board after a 
period of ten years. He shepherded the institution v/ith restraint and 
great skill through a period of enormous growth, a period highlighted by 
the arrival of the Brundage collection in San Francisco, and the merger of 
the Legion of Honor and the de Young Museum into The Fine Arts Museums, 

V/alter Neimian, v;ho succeeded to the presidency of the Board of Trustees, 
took immediate steps to further strengthen the consolidation by urging that 
the chairman of the Museum Society become an active member of the Board of 
Trustees, thus assisting comm-unication betv/een the two important governing 
bodies of The Fine Arts Museums, He also has taken steps to improve the 
climate of relations between the Asian Art Museum and The Fine Arts Museums, 

The Museums’ recent pattern of borrowing exhibitions instead of creating 
our o;ra was reversed in an exhibition of American Art from the Collection 
of Mr, and Mrs, John D, Rockefeller 3rd, It provided a new synergy between 
the rausewiis and tv;o San Francisco Bay Area teaching institutions. Rather 
than lecture from slides in the classroom. Professor V/anda Corn brouglit 
students from Mills College and U. C, Berkeley to spend part of the course 
v/orking directly vn.th origincd v/orks of art In the Mviseum. An innovative 
interdisciplinary program dravri.ng on musical, dramatic aiixihistorical 
resources was developed in connection with the exhiDition. 

For the first time, the Museums were able to extend their operatic rs to 
a location beyond the buildings in the parks. Due to the renovation at 
the de Yoimg Museum, the Art School moved its classrooms to a dov/ntov/n 
center in a two-story brick building at 651 Hov/ard Street on the edge of 
the business district. They set up their looms for v;eaving and held various 
other classes and also established a lively series of experimental ex- 
liibitions. These programs appealed to a new audience. Office v/orkers 
dropped in dirring limch breaks and came by at the end of the v/orking day 
to take art classes. The Dovmtown Art Center became very popular and with 
funds provided by the Chief Administrative Officer from the hotel tax, and 
grants from the San Francisco Foundation and The Museum Society, operations 
are assured for another year in this location even after classes resume at 
the de Young Museum Art School in the fall of 1977* 


- ii - 


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Important new developments in reorganization of the staff took place. 

The reorganization of the Education Division has been accomplished by separating 
departmental functions between the Art School, Department of Public Programs 
and the new Department of Interpretation which includes the Docent Council. 

The departments v.dthin the Education Division v/ork closely with each other 
and the Department of Exhibitions to develop the strongest programs for the 
public. 

Top management of the Museum staff v/as also reorganized. The position of 
vice director for collections (chief curator) v/as abolished. New titles v/ere 
given to the other vice directors; Deputy Director for Education and Exhibitions, 
and Deputy Director for Administration and Development, The Director assumed 
the responsibilities of the curatorial diidsion vdth strong support from the 
departments idth collections, namely Prints and Dravdngs (the Achenbach) v/ith 
Robert Flynn Johnson in charge, and Painting and Sculp tiire with Thomas P. Lee, 

Jr, in charge. In the few months since February when Mr, Lee arrived, he has 
made significant improvements in the visual presentation of the paintings col- 
lections, He performs the duties of scholarly editor, very capably assisted 
in the production of publications by Ed\-ra,rd T, Engle, Dividing the publication 
responsibilities in this waj has been extremely helpful. 

At the end of the fiscal year, nev; ciirators for the department of Decorative 
Arts had been found. The approaching retirement in fall 1977 of long-time 
incumbent Graeme Keith was the opportunity to augment the department in a new 
way. Michael Conforti, a curator of European decorative arts, was found to 
head up the department, to be assisted by Donald Stover, a curator of American 
decorative arts, which is a new specialty for these Museums, Mr, Conforti is 
trained not only in European decorative arts, but also in sculpture. The 
present plan is to combine the departments of Paintings and Sculpture and 
Decorative Arts vjith Mr. Lee turning sculpture over to Mr. Conforti and Donald 
Stover, the specialist in American decorative arts, serving both curators in 
an associate capacity. Thus the Museums which are strong in European decorative 
arts, will have a "keeper” (in the English sense of the word) and there will be 
somebody to build the presently small American decorative arts collection to 
complement the strong Ainerican paintings holdings. 

At the Board level, V/alter Newman has developed the concept of bringing 
in outside resource people to assist the Museums though they do not necessarily 
become members of the Board of Trustees, For instance. Dr, Joseph Goldyne, an 
artist-collector-scholar, has been a member of the Acquisitions Committee, 

Mr, Neman also instituted a Trustee Exhibition Committee, a wise move in 
view of the enormity and complexity of the future big exhibitions: Celtic, 
Dresden, Tutankhamim and Treasures from the Kremlin. 

These exhibitions are the challenge to help realize the long range goals 
for the Museums, If Tutankhamun comes, it comes by "popular demand". By the 
end of the reporting period it seemed assured, Talien as a group tliese are 
among the most sought after and prestigious exhibitions v/hich will be seen in 
the United States, They mil keep the Museums in the cultural foregroimd in 
the next several years. But they can be staged only by increasing the staff 
which has been overextended even to accomplish the normal work load and the 
special exhibition galleries in both museum buildings will have to have humid- 
ity and temperature controls in order to handle the crov/ds anticii^ated for these 
exhibitions. Controlled atmosphere for the safety of the objects is a standard 
prerequisite for contracting these international exhibitions. 


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In the summer of 1976 the Art V/orkers Coalition demanded that the museums 
become more responsive to the community* The protest centered around the 
structure of the board of trustees, self appointed and not representative of 
the broad geographic or ethnic diversity of the City, and the Museums programs 
were criticized for similar reasons* Although the protest had no overt 
immediate results, it caused review of the trustee rotation process, staff 
hiring practices and museum programming* Such scrutiny, I believe, v;ill 
increase the institution’s responsiveness in the long run* 

An attempt to find out who visits the Museums and why v/as one approach to 
the relevance issue* An audience survey study was conducted by a Stanford 
University graduate student, and a membership study sponsored by the Museum 
Society was conducted by a graduate student from the University of California, 
Results of both studies will be an aid to future programming and planning* 

The responsibilities of a museum staff are not limited to serving just their 
own museums* They frequently perform service to the museum field at large 
seinring on professional committees, juries, or rendering professional 
opinions and services* 

This year an endeavor of this sort involved everyone at the Museums to some 
degree v;hen the Association of Art Museum Directors visited the San Francisco 
Bay Area May 29-28 for its annual spring meeting* It was only the third time 
that such a meeting had taken place in San Francisco (previous meetings here 
occurred in 1939 and 195^), the first participated in by so many art museums. 
Receptions and events were held in the seven major art museums concluding with 
a morning symposium at Stanford. Splendid cooperation between the museums 
made the occasion a success and I am grateful to our staff and volunteers and 
to the Museum Society and Board of Trustees for their assistance and 
generosity. 

The reporting period ended with a major acquisition coming to the Museums 
through the Mildred Anna V/illiams Fund: Cezanne’s Les Rochers dans le Parc 
du Chateau Noir . It is the first oil painting by this 20th century master to 
be owned by a Bay Area museum. If renascence does indeed characterize the 
growth of the Museums this year, the arrival in San Francisco of such a 
Cezanne is very much to the point* One hopes that it will bring pleasure and 
renewal to all who stop by to contemplate it. 


Ian McKibbin VJhite 
Director of Museums 


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DEPARTI-IENT OF ^RICA, OCEANIA AND THE A14ERICAS 


iMs year the major efforts of the Department nf Africa, Oceania- and The 
Americas have "been directed towards planning and developing exhibitions, 
developing and maintaining our groining collection, and exploring 

new and better ways to interpret art to the public and encourage visitor 
involvement. 

Exiiibitiona 

Our departmgf?b * *s effort for tMe year wag Ifesterpieoes of Primitive 

Art j an isMMtlen erganited by the MusewA 'of feiMtiv© Art and iho 

fod^mtloa of Arts, which included over 100 mastei^cfNJtehs: frsm Africa, 
©oeasia- aM fhe toricas. The eschlMtljn as it appeared at the de Yotmg 
featured a visito]>-cent©red or participatory p^lnt of view, focusing cn 
central q^ueftiens like “What is a riiasterpiece?", "How useful is the term 

*mast©rpi©c© * in evaluating non-¥©steni objects?" and "What are one »s «wn 
feelings and preferences regarding great worl^a of art?”. Offering an 
alternative to the art-in-cultural-conterb view r^resented in the permanent 
gallery^ the exhibition sought to both emphasize and test the way Westerners 
look at art. 

The design of the exliibit reinforced the masterpiece theme by stressing the 
aesthetic inpact of the objects, display areas were light and spacious, 
carpeted ramps^ allowed multi-sided views of the art, and labelling was con- 
fined to hand railings so as not to distract from the art. Introductory 
area labels and the exhiMtion brochure explained t2ie point of view of the 
show and encouraged visitors to make their own aesthetic judgements by being 
more sensitive to tlieir feelings and to basic design elements lilce forr.i, line, 
color and texture, ©ocent tours and an audio-visual program reinforced these 
themes and an unusual educational area at the end of the exliibition, "The Game 
Room”, was an active and pleasant place where visitors of all ages could 
evaluate both the art and the exihibition through a series of manipulative 
games, a questionnaire and three free handouts. Volunteers were on hand to 
interact T>jith the public, answer questions and encourage peeple to respond 
to both the art and the exhibition* 

]yb.sterpieces of Primitive Art was attended by over S8,000 visitors, and we 
were pleased to extend it two weelcs. Special programs included a free film 
series, a syuposium given by University of GaUfomia Extension, and a special 
half-day celebration id-th refreshments, entertainment and free admission to the 
exhibition. 

Five smaller exliibitions were produced this year. The Masai by A1 van Dalen 
included 20 color photographs and a small cs,se of jeweiiy (November 2^-Januaiy 
31), Tamtam by John Kaufriian was an exhibition of 20 color photographs of a 
ffi-cronesian group (Febru.ary l-dune 30), and T3ie Asmat by laurens HtUhouse 
consisted of 21 black and white photographs, a war shield and an elaborate 
woven bo<5y costurae (July 2-October 31), 


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AFRICA, OCEAIJIA AND THE AMEIGAS (Continued) 

Tcfo IDitroductoiy Galleiy shows x^ere Container s (Februaiy 1-Jime 30 a-' cross- 

cultural selection of about 60 prts, baslcets, boxes, etc*, froiri the Museunis * 
collection, and Scrimsliaw (July 2-October 31) which focused on contact and 
cross cultural inii'luences in Eskimo and early American nautical arb and 
included selections from the Fine Arts Museums of 6an IVancisco, the Robert 
H. Lewie Museum of Anthropology and a private collection. 

Programs, Planning and On-going Research 


Coordination and planning for the Huichol Ait project (Fall 1978) got underiTay 
this year, Fe were extremely pleased to receive a grant in support of the 
esdiibition from National Endoxjment for the Aits, and we began to plan the 
accompanying publication x-rhich xdll be produced with a New York co-publisher. 

All eight contributors to the publication are presently working on their essays, 
and xje look forward to producing a work of lasting scholarly xTalue that offers 
a variety of approaches to Huichol art, 

A second major project that has reached the production stage is the Interpretive 
Sheets program for the permanent galleii^r of Africa, Oceania and The Americas, 
Eight different sheets, geared to xraiious ages, background and levels, xTill 
inteipret our collections to the public, 

¥e continue to develop materials for school use. An educational packet on the 
Bushmen of South Africa containing general infoianation, slides and loan objects 
was developed by a. voltnteer, Jean Colvin, Under the supervision of Yolanda 
Woo, the pre-Columbian objects we placed on long-teim loan to the San Francisco 
Unified School Sistrict last year have been converted to stutfy Idlts and used by 
many school children. 

Collections 


Donations continue to grexj? ue received over 2^0 gifts this year (valued at 
over $566,500), Of these donations, approximately 62% were African, 2C% were 
North American Indian (1 donor) and the iTemainder xiere Oceanic, We made txro 
purchases tliis year from the Salinger Fund and accepted over 175 loans (valued 
at $137,000) for tempo raay display. 

With the help of Ellen Werner, a long-time volxxnteer, docent and graduate stud- 
ent at Lone Mbxmtain, x^e have made great strides in organizing and stoiing our 
textile collection, a mssive project that promises to continue into future 
years, ¥e are veiy giateful for Ife, Werner thorough and painstaldng work in 
caring for oxir textiles, to say nothing of her exacting research on an elaborate 
and nysterious feather collar. 

As the year drew to a close we XTere very pleased to move our collection into 
new storage space, and we look fon-jard to systematically reorganizing it, Flana 
f«r the immediate future include incorporating riiany of our new African donations 
into the perriianent gallery, 

fhomas K, Seligman Eathleen Berrin 

Cxrrator in aoarge Assistant Curator 

Dexjartmoit of Africa, Oceania Department of Africa, Oceania 

and The Americas and Hie Americas 


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DEPAPTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS 


The year ims narked by a nunber of exceptionally important additions to the 
perr.]anent collection xdth particular enpiiasis on American decorative arts. 

Acquisitions 


Mong the most important' American additions, were; 

Hiiladelphia Highboy^ ca* 1760» Gift of Mr# and Mrs, Robert A, Magoi-ian 

Scenic wallpaper " Sauvages de la Mer Pacifigue ”, Printed by Joseph Dofour 
from designs by Jean-Gabriei Chavet, T^rench^" l8o6. Gift of Georgia M, 
Worthington and The Fine Arts Museums Trust Fund, Wliile of French manu- 
facture, these papers were much used in American houses of the Federal 
period. The rer-iarlcably complete set of panels is in mint condition, and 
the t\K> missing panels liave been filled-in xfith accurate replicas » 

Ihrlor from house in Nexjbuiyport, i'fe.ssachusetts, 180^« Gift of Tlie Museum 
Society Auxiliai^r, 

The Herber Ship Tapestry , Albert Herter, Arae rican, 1913* 

:^ard of 'Trustees purchase, 

California: Poppies . Tapestry woven after a design by Iferlc Adams, Woven 
during the Tapestr^r exhibition. Donated by Iferk Adams, 

Among welcome acquisitions in the field of European decorative arts were the 
f olloi-jing : 

Jacob >s Dream , Tapestry, Flemish, l6th century. Gift of Elissabeth 
Ebert' and A'rthur W, Barney. 

Coffee pot . Silver, English, 1726, ]yfe.ker; Thoinas Mason, 

Gift of Mr, and l‘£rs, George Hopper Fitch, 

Nest of “quartette” tables , English, ca* 1810, 

Gift of Magowan Decorative Arts Fundw 

Silver-gilt Chalice ^ German, l^th centuryj Medal of Mohammad II, 

Bertoldo di Giovanni, Italian, li;80-90| Ihir of Ivory Plaques, 

Gerriian, ca, 1^20, 

Gift of Julius Landauer, 

Exliibitions 


Thirty-three tapestries fmm the permanent collection formed the nucleus of 
an exhibition Five Centuries of Tapestry , held at the California Palace of the 
Legion of Honor from November 20, 1976-February 13, 1977, Seven loans enriclied 
the presentation, Tlie Belgian Ministry of Flemislr Culture sent a concurrent 
loan exl'n.bition, ”The History of Jacob”, a series of 10 tapestries from The 
Royal TJuseums of Art and History, Brussels, Anna G, Bennett's catalogue of 


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DEPARTMEMT OF DECORATIVE ARTS (Continued) 


the Museuns ^ perriianent tapesti^j^ collection was published at the tine of the 
exhibition, and a panel of international tapestiy experts presented papers 
on technical and art historical aspects of tapestries in a 2-day syiaposiunia 
Preparation for publishing these papers in their entirety is in pro{p:’ess. 

An exliibition. Lace from the Museums > collect iona , ’tjaa presented at the 
California Palace of the Legion of Honor July 26'-Sepbember 6, 1976j it 
included deraonst rations of lace maldng by local practitioners of the art. 

Conservation 


The textile conservation xjorkshop continues xjith the aid of many dedicated 
volunteers to prepare the tapestries for the traveling exliibition Five 
Centuries of Tapestries to be circulated to four American riiuseuins. The 
textile Conservation Workshop and Textile Storage have been re-organized 
and located in enlarged quarters and furnished xjith nex^ metal storage 
cabinets , 


D* Graerae Keith, Curator-in-Cliarge 
Department of Decorative Arts 


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DEPARTIffiNT OF PAINTINGS & SCULPTTIRE 


The Department’s past year car be described unequivocally as one of 
dramatic and solid progress in all areas of activities: making acquisitions 
of international iii5)ortance, sponsoring major loan exhibitions, and exhibit- 
ing the permanent collection. 

Acquisitions 

After a somewhat dormant period of two years in acquiring paintings, the 
Museums made tremendous strides this year — particularly in the area of 
French paintings, purchasing significant examples from the seventeenth, 
eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, St, Jerome in his Study by Claude 
Vignon added a much needed religious example to the seventeenth-century 
collections where genre and mythological subject matter is dominant. 

The Pastoral Landscape by Louis Gabriel Moreau the Elder marks the Museujifls’ 
first major representation of landscape painting in the collections' already 
rich and varied eighteenth-century holdings, A beautiful bronze sculpture. 

La Source by Sdme Bouchardon, is a proud con^lement to our eighteenth-century 
paintings' collection at the Legion of Honor, Easily the landmark purchase 
for the Museums this year and one which San Francisco will continue to be 
prpud of for many years is Paul Cezanne's Les Rochers dans le pare du 
Chateau Noir, 


Making its debut at the Legion in a new installation of nineteenth-century 
French art this Spring, the Cezanne has already become one of the major 
cultural assets of this city. As the only oil painting by this artist in 
a public northern California collection, its importance extends far beyond 
its intrinsic classical beauty to reach students who wish to study traditional 
art hovering at the brinlc of the modern world. 

Several gifts should be mentioned: 

1976: BETTS - Portrait of Alma Sevening (oil) 

Gift of Lav/rence V/estdahl, Accession # 1976,5 

15th century stone sculpture St, Barbara 
Gift of Paul Ballora 

Joseph VSRNST - Les Baigneuses , (oil) 

Gift of Mrs, Georgia M, Worthington 

Joseph DECKER - Upset (oil) 

Gift of Alfred Frankenstein 

It should be noted that these acquisitions - the life-blood which nurtures 
the grov;th of the Museums - came entirely from private funds. As our major 
soTJirce of income is rapidly depleting, new efforts must be made in a broad, 
cofflmunity-\d.de campaign to ens-ure our continuing program tlirough greater 
endowment funds. 


- 5 - 


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Exhibitions 

American Art from the Collection of I-Ir, & Mrs, John D> Rockefeller III not 

only was the Museums* bicentennial celebration contribution, but it also 
emphasized the Museum’s growing enthusiasm for American art, long unexhibited 
during the Renovation Project at the de Young* The benefits from this ex- 
hibition have come both in educational areas and the continued loan of eight 
important paintings from Mr. and lirs. Rockefeller, The exhibition Jean 
Baptiste Greuze afforded San Francisco the opportimity to see the first 
major loan shov/ of this artist*s work, a shov; first seen in Hartford, Connec- 
ticut, and later in Dijon, France, 

Permanent Coll e ction 


With the acquisition of three major paintings for the Legion of Honor, 
of the galleries were reinstalled vri.th new attention given to scale and 
educational needs. The major effort, however, was behind the scenes, 
preparing for the opening of the nev; American Galleries, Virtually all the 
American paintings - and they number in the hundreds - were given work, 
including research, reframing, and conservation. Under the able direction 
of Donelson F, Hoopes, v;e could see for the first time the importance of the 
collection, arranged chronologically within themes and could anticipate with 
enthusiasm the opening of the galleries on July 4th, At the same time plans 
were implemented to focus our attention next year on the permanent collection 
of European paintings at the de Young, 

Staff 

Marion Stewart, a volunteer research assistant, continued her research on 
the French paintings for publication, which otherwise would not have been 
possible by the salaried staff, Mary Small and Dorothy Kemper, also volun- 
teers, began the research v;ork on rehanging the de Yoiing collection, Donel- 
son F, Hoopes, Visiting Curator for the American Galleries, performed a 
myriad of jobs which otherwise would have meant further delays for the 
American Galleries, Teri Oikav/a-Picante , Conservator, besides examining all 
loans and maintaining the permanent collection, worked with diligence to pre- 
pare all of the American paintings for exliibition. In a few months V/illiam H 
Eisner >o.ll be retiring after twenty-two years of service to the Museums, 
Without his supervision, sensitivity, and attention to detail none of the 
accomplishments outlined in the preceding paragraphs would have been realized 

Conclusion 


Ever larger demands v;ere made on the Department, all of which have been met 
v/ith enthusiasm. From considering v/orlcs of art for purchase, continuing 
research on the collection, and fulfilling the didactic requirements of 
exhibition, to staging temporary loan shows, communicating to the public 
verbally and in v/riting, and supervising conservation, \7e have endeavored to 
do our best, but the demands continue to grow xidthout new staff to aid in our 
goals, 

Thomas P, Lee 
Curator-in-Charge 

Department of Painting Sc Sculpture 


- 6 - 


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ACHEI'IBACH FOUNDATION FOR GRAPHIC ARTS 


In 19^8 Mr, and Mrs, Moore S, Aclienbach created the Achenbach Foundation for 
Graphic Arts, and presented their entire collection of prints to the City and 
County of San Francisco, vrf.th the provision that it would be housed in the 
Legion of Honor, The Foundation is, in effect, the Museum's department of 
prints and drawings, with the largest graphics collection in the western United 
States, It houses not only a systematic representation of the history of 
printmaking from the 15th century to the present (with approximately 100,000 
prints) but also nearly 2,000 drav/ings, a collection of illustrated books, 
and an extensive library of more than 3»000 volumes. 

The graphics collection has been substantially increased through an endow- 
ment bequest of the Achenbachs and by generous benefactions of other donors. 

The Achenbach Foundation undertook an. active program in 1978-77 ? including 
exhibitions and further acquisitions. 

An important function of the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts is its use 
as a teaching resource for the many Universities, Colleges, and Art Schools 
in Northern California, Throughout the academic year, classes of art history 
students or artists visit the collection to view and discuss original prints 
and drawings. These are selected and shown by the curators in the Achenbach 
Foundation, 

1978-77 Activities 

Following is a summary of the activities of the Achenbach Foundation for 
Graphic Arts (AFGA) in 1978-775 a fuller description is found in Appendix I. 

Exhibitions: 15 in total, comprising 109^ works of art. 

Loans to /,"GA; 704 items from 13 sources. 

Loans from -‘FGA: 217 items to 15 destinations. 

Gift acquisitions: 20 drawings from 10 donors; 3^3 prints from 29 donors 
Purchase acquisitions: 10 drawings; 58 prints 
Library gifts: 20 books and catalogues. 


- 7 - 


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DEPARTMENT OF EXHIBITIONS 


The Department of Exhibitions is responsible for all aspects of the physical 
installation of v/orks of art in the Museums for both temporary exhibitions 
and permanent gallery installations. Serving as a coordinating and pro- 
duction center, the Department interfaces vm.th all of the curatorial depart- 
ments within the Museums to meet the organizational and installation require- 
ments for the exhibitions program. In addition, the Department works with 
the Education Department to coordinate the production and use of interpre- 
tative material prepared for exhibition use, assists with the preparation of 
catalogue materials, and maintains the master exhibition schedule for several 
years in advance. 

During the Fiscal Year 1976-1977 the Department of Exliibitions was involved 
with the planning, coordinating, and mounting of 22 exhibitions, v/ith an 
additional five shov/s installed at the Downtovm Art Center, Although this 
reflects a reduction in the number of exhibitions installed compared to the 
previous year, three of the exhibitions required a greatly increased amount 
of gallery space, time, and staff energy in organizing and plamaing, SAN 
FRANCISCO; AS Vffl VfflRE, AS ARE; FIVE CENTURIES OF TAPESTRIES; and MASTER- 
PIECES OF PRIMITIVE ART v/ere scheduled for three months of public vievdng each 
individually using betweeen 12,000 and 15,000 square feet of gallery space. 

The SAN FRANCISCO exhibition and the TAPESTRY exhibition were self-organized 
by The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. 

Phase One of the de Yoimg Museum renovation project reached completion this 
year with the opening of the American Galleries and includes expanded and 
improved areas for the preparators workshop, design offices, and storage areas 
The improved facilities and expanded space have resulted in a more centralized 
and efficient design and fabrdcation operation for the exhibition and graphic 
design departments and the preparators crev;. 

The Classical Gallery (Gallery One) opened at the de Young in September, 1976. 
Though it was scheduled to open last year, the strain of our ambitious 
exhibition program delayed the completion of this installation. 

Continued physical improvements to the exhibition spaces included additional 
track lighting systems at the California Palace of the Legion of Honor and 
hard-surfaced walls in Galleries A and B at the de Young, The soiled fabric 
walls continue to be a problem of maintenance and expense in other gallery 
spaces. 

The exhibition program of contemporary art continued \d.th a series of shows 
in Galleries A and B at the de Young Museum, The exliibitions were accompanied 
by a series of programs called "Meet the Artist," instituted last year, in 
which the artist appears in the galleries to meet with the museum visitors and 
answer questions. Another program called Artists’ Day was also continued: 
the Curator of Exhibitions met with Bay Area artists once a month to revie^^r 
portfolios and discuss their works of art. 




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DEPARTMENT OF EJOIIBITIONS (Continued) 


The Graphic Design Department produced all of the signage for the temporary 
exhibitions and permanent gallery installations, including the educational 
and directional graphics for the American V/ing, a suite of ten galleries 
and foiir educational corridors, FLve posters, a major catalogue, an 
informational newspaper, and an introductory brochure to the museums, as 
well as all membership material and the Museum Society calendar, were also 
designed and produced by this department. 

Adequate staffing continues to be our most serious problem. Our small crew 
of six preparators, assisted by three CETA employees, reflects an increase 
from the previous year, but the critical position of Chief Preparator was 
eliminated from the City budget. As a result, our preparators crew vi;as 
forced to function without proper leadership, while being responsible for 
installing and maintaining exhibitions in over 100,000 square feet of gallery 
space in two separate buildings. The elimination of this position became 
even more serious as the exhibition program escalated in quantity, content, 
and size, necessitating the addition of temporary preparators to assist our 
small permanent crew with major installations. 

Looking to the future, the time and energy of the entire staff iidll be con- 
siimed by three major exhibitions that are presently in the planning and 
organizational stages: TREA, CURES FROM CELTIC IRELAIO; DRESDEN: 500 YEARS 
OF COLLECTING; and TREASURES OF TUTANKHAMUN. Each exhibition, posing major 
problems in organizing, shipping, installation, security requirements and 
crowd control, will make it absolutely crucial to have adequately trained 
additional staff vm.thin the next year to assist the existing staff with the 
ensuing responsibilities. Equally important is the acknowledgement that the 
permanent collections continue to require proper and careful maintenance, 
which, if ignored, could result in serious damage and deterioration to the 
works of art. Additional trained staff, adequate materials, supplies and 
equipment, and a properly functioning physical plant \d.ll be vitally 
necessary for the next few years if we are to maintain a responsible balance 
between major temporary exhibitions and the maintenance of the permanent 
collections. 


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TEMPORARY E]aiIBITIONS - Legion of Honor 


FIVE CEMTURIES OF TAPESTKEES (Nov. 20 - Feb, 13, 1977) 33 tapestries dating 
from the l4tli to 20th c^^tiiries, from the collection of the Fine Arts Museums, 
plus 8 on loan from museums, individuals, and from Grace Cathedral, There v/c.re 
demonstrations of tapestry weaving in conjunction with the exliibition, a scale 
model of a Medieval Mystery Play stage, and an audio-visual program, 

THE HISTORY OF JACOB (Nov, 20 - Jan, 30, 1977) - 10 tapestries from the l6th 
century, lent by the Belgian I’iinistry of Flemish Cultujre as Belgium’s 
Bicentennial salute to the United States, Designed by Bernard van Orley, 
the tapestries were woven by V/illem de Kempeneer, and illustrate the life of 
the patriarch Jacob. 

A IS FOR ANIMAL (Dec. 11 - Jan. 23, 1977) - A Holiday exhibition that includes 
antique and folk toy and.raals, contemporary drawings and posters, plus bio- 
logical and ecological information on twelve animals. 

JEAN-BAPTISTE GPJIUZE (I723~l803 ) (March 5 - May 1, 1977) - 96 paintings and 
Sawings by the l8th century French artist. This first American selection 
v;as organized by the Uadsv/orth Atheneum, Hartford, Conn, 

TEMPOPJmY EXHIBITIONS - de Young Museum 

AS VJE VJERB, AS Vi/E ARE; A Century of San Francisco Life in Architecture 

lOct, 9, 1976 - Jan. 30, 1977) ^ 

The exhibition comprises four parts: 

1, AS IIS IVSRE : Photographs from the collection of Moulin Studio, documenting 
the achievements and celebrations of the city for more than 70 years, 

2, AS NE ARE : A multi-media program that sketched the present day life of 
the city, visually and orally, using the voices of native San Franciscans 
to narrate a collage of slide images. 

3« Our Ovm Houses; An exhibition of the development of the Bay Area's ovm. 

distinctive residentiej. architecture, 

4, A Gift to the Streets : San Francisco's Victorian legacy documented in 

large scale prints emphasizing the detail in these 19th century buildings. 

PHOTOGRiYPPIS OF THE MASAI (Nov. 25 - mid February 1977) - 20 color photographs 
of the Masai, an East African nomadic group, plus a small display of Masai 
jewelry and artifacts, 

CONTAII'IERS (Jan, 29 - June) - A cross-ciiltural exhibition of 4o different 
types of containers that include ceramic pots, baskets, pouches, vases, and 
jars. Selected from the museum's collections, 

MASTBPJ>IECES OF PRIMITH/E ART (Mar, 19 - June 5, 1977) - More than 150 
ceremonial and utilitarian objects from Africa, the South Pacific, and the 
Americas, including masks, ancestral figures, vessels, and jewelry, organized 
by the American Federation of Arts, 


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TEMPORARY E>n-IIBITIONS - De Young Museum (Continued) 


TOM MARIONI; THINiaNG OUT LOUD (May 7 - June 26, 1977) - An exliibition of 
drawings created by body movement that combines performance ant and visual 
art, Marioni is founder and director of the Museum of Conceptual Art. 

COLOR PI-IOTOS OF MICRONESIA (Feb. 1, 1977 - Jiily 2, 1977) - 20 color photo- 
graphs of Tarnatam Islamders talcen by Bay Area photographer John I^aufman, 


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TEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS 1976-1977 
Achenbach Foimdation for Graphic Arts 


TURN OF THE CENTURY AMERICAN POSTERS May 22 - July lo, 1976 
80 Posters by a number of American artists v/hose work regularly appeared in 
the national publications such as Harper’s, Scribner’s, Century* All from 
Arthur Barney bequest. 

DRAWINGS BY GORDON BALDWIN May 22 - JvR-.y l8, 1976 

25 Precise Pen and Ink Drawings by a yoimg San Francisco Bay Area artist. 

Poster published. 

RECENT ACQUISITIONS September 4 - October 24, 1976 

89 Prints and Dravn.ngs, recent acquisitions through gifts and purchases of 
the Achenbach Foundation. 

AMERICA OBSERVED: ETCHINGS BY EDV/APJ) HOPPER - PHOTOGRAPHS BY V/ALKER EVANS. 
September 4 - October 24, 1976 

17 Etchings by Edward Hopper; 33 Photographs by Walker Evans. 

SELECTIONS FROM THE ADRIANI COLLECTIONS September I 8 - November l4, 1976 
123 choice selections of prints, drawings, paintings and illustrated books, 
all from the extensive lifetime gifts and 1971 bequest of Brimo and Sadie 
Adriani, 

JAMES TOPJVIKSON September I 8 - October 24, 1976 

25 Prints in the techniques of etching, aquatint, and serigraph, the recent 
precisionist work of a young Bay Area printrnaker, winner of the Graphics Award 
of the 1975 S.F, Art Festival. Poster published. 

DAVID LANCS GOINES October 30 - January 9, 1977 

61 full color Contemporary Posters by a young Bay Area artist. With a full-color 
poster published by the artist especially for this exhibition. 

AMERICAN V/ATERCOLORS AND DRAV/INGS, from the Museum Permanent Collections 
January 22 - April 24, 1977 

23 American drawings and v.^atercolors from the permanent collections, selected 
to complement the American Federation of Arts circulating exhibition of 
American Master Drawings, 

AMERICAN I^TER DRAV/INGS AND WATSRCOLORS February 12 - April 17, 1977 
282 Masterpiece drawings and watercolors, dating from the earliest British 
explorers in America, circa 1383, down to American contemporary artists of the 
1970 ’s originated and circulated by the American Federation of Arts, 

Accompanied by a scholarly catalogue. 

THE FLUTE AND THE BRUSH February 26 - April 10, 1977 

30 Indian Miniature V/atercolor Paintings, loaned from the collection of 
V/illiam Broim & Paul V/onner. Accompanied by a scholarly catalogue. 


- 12 - 






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TEMPOEAEY EXHIBITIONS 






Achenbacli Foimdation for Graphic Arts (Continued) 


TrIE ESMAEK COLLECTION OF CURRIER 8c IVES COLOR PRINTS April 30 - June 12, 1977 
123 Color Lithographs of important Currier & Ives prints from the circulating 
Esmark collection, 

THE BARBIZON TRADITION May 27 - September, 1977 

42 Prints and Drawings illustrating the work of the Barbizon School artists 
and their subsequent influence on the Impressionist and other French artists. 

FRENCH l8th CENTURY DRAWINGS, from the Museum*s Permanent Collections 
May 27 - September, 1977 

38 French Drawings of the l8th Century, selected from the permanent collections, 

ARTIST PORTRAITS 8c SELF-PORTPJVITS , PART II June 25 - August l4, 1977 
76 Prints illustrating how artists have seen themselves and others from the 
sixteenth century to the present. All prints are from the permanent collection. 

SANDPOIA HU - MONOTYPES June 25 - August l4, 1977 

35 recent full color Monotypes by a young San Francisco artist. 


1976 - 1977 FISCilL YEAR TOTALS; 15 Exhibitions comprising 

1094 objects of art . 


~ 13 - 





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PABITING CONSERVATION LABORATORY 


Most the past year was spent in conserving the suddenly-expanded list of 
Araerican paintings in preparation for the de Yonng Museurii’s new American wing, 
and although the restoration of paintings is not finished, 2^ worl<s given 
rnajor treatment "by me have been installed, Hiese paintings include those 
painted by the Peales, West, Doughty, Trunibull, Morse, Ihness, Stuart, Morton, 
Ifeihn, Nahl and Decker, 

All paintings considered for acquisition were examined, many in detailed tech- 
nical analyses with reports of my findings to the Acquisition Committee, 

Some of these were; 

1, CcEanne Rocics in the Park of the Cliateau Noir 

2, Watteau La Partie Quarr^ 

Chasseriau TVjo Portraits 

i;* Vignon St, ?erone an His Studio 
Bazille PortrarE' 

6, If'Jhistler Seas cape 

Technical analyses were also done for the publication of the French Paintings 
Catalog, Scholarly research of the Rose Jfegnin gift. Portrait of a Musician 
by the Ifester of ELertialle, oil on wood panel, was begun^ The Fragonard, 
Daubigny, Greuze, Riter and Schongauer (gifts which arrived in 1975 from the 
sarae donor) have nearly been restored to their brilliant original state. 

The condition of every painting in a traveling ^chibition or part of a loan, 
such as the Rockefeller collection in the American Galleries, is thoroughly 
checked out| riiany of then must be given some type of treati.ient to insure 
their safety Triiile in our museums* The inspection and reframing of every 
painting in our permanent collections was resumed for a fexr days only because 
help for this inportant work has been only sporadic. 

At the Western Association of Art Conservators Meeting in San Diego, I presenter' 
a slide lecture on the treatment of a severely deteriorated x7ood panel painting c 

Since riy eraployraent in 1970, I have been doing all the work iiui-LJaDly c>?xn-ied on 
by a staff of three conservators in other museums, I have continued to rini- 
mlly care for our own paintings, doing all the examinations, restorations, 
docurrentation, traveling exhibitions, anal3rtical work, repairing daraages, etc. 

In order to continue these services and to continue caring for the paintings 
in a professional manner, I again, stress the operative need for enlarging the 
painting conservation staff. 


Teri Oilarwa-Picante 
Painting Conservator 


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REXSISTRAR’S REPORT - M, H. DE YOUNG MM^IORIAL MUSEUM 


During the 1976-1977 period the Registrar continued to receipt, number, 
catalogue, insure safe handling of and return of all incoming/outgoing gifts 
and extended loans to the permanent collection; arrange for the pick-up, 
receipt, safe keeping and return of temporary exhibitions; be responsible 
for all storage facilities; supervise the receiving, unpacking, crating and 
shipping of all art objects; maintain the photography records and arrange for 
special reproduction orders; supervise the museum vehicle and its scheduling; 
and keep in order the accession, loan, research, archival, exhibition and nine 
other file systems. 

In addition, the Registrar personally prepared the monthly insurance reports; 
handled damage and loan claims; conducted tours of his department and museivn 
facilities; made records available to scholars, students, representatives from 
other institutions and qualified individuals; answered written inquiries per- 
tinent to the museum* s collections and history and was available, in the 
absence of curators, to answer telephone inquiries of a curatorial nature; 
continued to accompany the transport of art objects of more than nominal value; 
and supervised, when needed, the placement and movement of art items through 
the museum. 

Much of the accelerated activity which made the previous year so atypical 
diminished or was absorbed into the general routine during this period. The 
items which had been so laboriously processed for de-accessioning were boxed 
and stored for future final dissolution, and as the fiscal year came to a 
close the new basement storage areas were starting to be occupied by the 
contents of the old areas destined to be the new conservation laboratories. 

In addition to the six display galleries closed the previous year it was 
necessary to close four more (plus tv;o on a temporary basis) to accommodate 
all the collection objects and exhibition material v;hich would normally be 
on display or in storage areas. Still atypical, however, was the necessity 
to relocate the Registrar's Office and all the museum's own archival mateid.al 
to make way for the offices of the Archives of American Art, 

Aside from regular routine, servicing temporary exhibitions and office moving, 
the last half of the period's time was devoted to preparations for the opening 
of the new American galleries. Paintings and sculpture were transferred from 
the Legion of Honor and assembled with those from the de Yoiuig collection in 
two specially prepared galleries. Also, at the direction of the visiting 
curator, arrangements were made for the securing of sixty- two items from 
some twenty lenders all over the country. 

The period closed with active preparations being made for the formidable tasks 
of completing the new basement area and converting once again to public use the 
ten galleries and halls now being used for storage and work areas. 


- 15 - 


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REGISTRAR - LEGION OF HONOR 


As custodian and ’librarian of all art objects’ the Registrar works ;d.th 
most of the staff as a hub of art object activity, and also cooperates v/ith 
’outside’ art freight forwarders, customs and insurance brokers, photog- 
raphers, and visiting art scholars, students and art couriers. V/e are in 
charge of the safe care and logistics of all art movement, and the insurance 
and documentation of all art objects owned and borrov/ed, past and present, 
by the Museum whose records we keep. 

This year the Registrar was primarily occupied \d.th processing temporary 
exhibitions of loaned art objects, such as large tapestries, 460 toys from 
32 lenders to the "A is for Animal” Art School exhibition, 105 works by Jean 
Baptiste Greuze, from both American & international lenders, 268 American 
Vi/atercolors & Drawings, and 85 examples of hand-lettering imported for ex- 
hibition from the German calligrapher Friedrich Neugebauer. 

In addition, 34 shipments of objects considered for possible acquisition 
were sent in and out of the Museum, as were 37 of our o\-jn collection ob- 
jects which journeyed to and from outside exhibitions at other museums. 

Our French 19th century collection was moved up and dovm several times 
alternating v;ith temporary exhibitions in the same galleries. 

Permanent collection records were slowly improved when the Registrar had time 
to encoiirage and supervise periodic volunteer assistance. A major project 
was the gathering together of all "historic” files, periodicals & scrapbooks 
into a newly lighted and painted Archives Room for art records from 1924- 
1968. 

Interns also assisting v/ith individual files for newly accessioned objects 
were; undergraduates Ann Pearson and Jennifer Church of Mills College, and 
Mary Thompson of Lone Mountain, and graduate student Paula March of Lone 
Mountain College Museum Studies Program; Hanna Regev worked for many months 
on the 79 objects in the Helene Irvd.n Fagan Collection. Other volunteers 
were high school student Suzanne Green, art history student Madeleine Gunther 
who accessioned and marked the jades collection, art historian Maria Luise 
Huntington who researched French paintings, and Pauline Jacobsen who began 
a long-term project to compile centralized past exhibition card records by 
documenting every shov; from 1947 through 1958. 

The Legion Registrar’s office has been a one-person operation and therefore 
it has been difficult to simultaneously keep tip \d.th the processing of tem- 
porary loan exhibitions AND the creation and maintenance of thorough col- 
lection object records. The separate location of both the museum library 
and theand the Curatorial staff at the other building has meant that time 
must be devoted to staff communication memoranda and that curatorial assist- 
ance with art object records is not steadily available. Telephone and 
visitors inqviiries of a curatorial nature are often answered by the Registrar 
v/hen Curators are not on the premises, and art object receiving is done i/hen 
the Miiseum Packer is at the other building. 

Some staff assistance was provided this year by Linda Holden, v/ho worked on 
object photograph files maintenance & customer order collating & invoicing, 
by Rockefeller Fellow Philip Hart, who registered & thoroughly described the 
entire Neugebauer Calligraphy shipment, and by Art School staff members v/ho 
provided the majority of the transportation and documentation of the Toys 
exhibition. At the end of Fiscal Year 76-77 the Registrars v/ere looking 
forward to receiving much-needed help from a new parttime Assistant Registrar 
to be funded by the Museum Society to work vri.th both the de Young and Legion 
of Honor offices. 


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MUSEUM LIBRAEX 


♦ 


# 


Libraiy services and security of materials uere greatly ir, proved by the 
remodeling project of 1976-77* The iiiaseum now has a reading room, a 
separate stack area, a small reference section and an office for the 
librarian* 

Use of the libraiy 

Because of the disruptions of the remodeling process, and because of the 
continued severe library sta^ff shortage (1 librarian to serve the staffs 
of the two museums), libraiy use was limited to museum staff members only. 

It is hoped tliat with an increase in libraiy staff next year we xirill be able 
to serve the public, at least to a liiaited degree. 


Books added to the 

collection 

by purcliase 

287 

as gifts or 


by excliange 

390 

Total 

677 

Periodicals 



^0 titles are currently being received, 
Libraiy exchange program 


Three catalogues xjere sent to each of 107 libraries and museums in the United 
States and abroad in 1976, a total of 321 voliimes. Catalogues sent were; 
Ar,ierican Art; Lie Rockefeller Collection , Three Centuries of French Art , 

Yol, II (The Norton SLiion Collection), and Araerica Observed , 

The exdiange program was greatly helped in all phases by the devoted volunteer 
assistance of Luise Bates, 


Jane Nelson 
Librarian 


- 17 - 








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EDUCATION DIVISION 




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As one of the tliree iiiajor divisions id.thin the Museums, the Education Division 
is responsible for the use of tlie pen.ianent and tenporaiy collections to teach 
the public about the histoiy of art and culture, the appreciation of art, the 
riiaicing of art and the interrelationships between different forms of art. To 
this end the division has several depaitr.ients wliich specialize in canying aut 
aspects of this responsibility* Each of the departments (Program, Art School, 
Docents and Volunteers) presents a separate report detailing its activities 
iranediately following this report. 

The activities of office have been broadened tliis year as the overall pro- 
graiiTS -^f the Museur.is have continued to expand. Hie primaiy areas of activity 
have been in overall museum planningj long range developmentj reoiganization 
af the Education division^ special educational programs for exliibitions; and 
Intern and volunteer training. 

As a special project, this office lias had a centml role in the planning of 
the new American Wing and galleries just completed, as well as in the planning 
and supervision of the various departmental and operational moves which were 
necessitated by the renovation project at the de Young. This includes the 
planning and move of the entire Museum »s art storage of several hundred 
thousand objects into the new storage| the return of the Art School into 
its newly renovated facility^ the restructuring of the shop and service spaces; 
and the movement of offices and personnel. 

Another major area of involvement has been in the restructuring of the 
relationship between the Education Division and the rest of the Museur.TS — 
particularly the Department of Ebdiibitions, since many of the education 
prograjiis involve themselves with exliibitions , To that end we have worked 
through tlie City budgetary process to restructure the functions of my office 
to include the Department of ExMbitions. Hois was approved as part of our 
budget and is effective July 1 , 1977 « 

Because of the size and scope of the renovation project at the de Young, the 
exliibitions and education programs were somewhat curtailed althougH there were 
several programs of note. We produced extensive label materials for our new 
gallery of Classical Art, placing the objects witliin their cultural context. 

In a sirdlar manner we rewrote the contextural labels for our perr.ianent French 
collections. 

In the area of teimporary exhibitions, we produced an audio-visual program as 
part of the exhibition of San Franciscans architectural history. As We VJere , 

As We A27e . We also had a large film and lecture program for tliis exliibit. 

For the exliibition Five Centuries of Tapestries we produced an audio-visual 
program and extensive expianatoiy labels whidi will circulate xith the ex- 
liibition to other museums. We held a 3-day symposium of international scholars 
on tapestries, and during the exhibition itself we had weaving, spinning and 
dying deiuonstrations in the galleries as well as trained docents who explained 
the exhibition to the visitors. For two visiting exhibitions, Jean-!^ptiste 
Greuze and American 1-fe.ster Dramngs and Watercolors , we rewrote the accompany- 
3ng Ta'bels, produced a ‘brn'cliur'e and Had a series of lectures. 


- 18 - 


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EDUCATION DIVISION (Continued) 

For the exliibition Masterpieces of Primitive Art^ we developed an orientation 
area designed to acquaint the visitor iiith the art historical concepts used 
to determine a msterpiece. Within the exliibition we provided an audio visual 
prograra and, at the end of the exhibition, a Game Room which Imd several 
programmed learning situations using computers and other teaching formats. 

We also produced a bmchure and several handouts for the esdiibition. Finally, 
we distributed an extensive questionnaire to visitors to detem'iiine wliich amas 
were successful and wliich were not. In association with tliis exhibition, we 
collaborated with University of California Extension on a symposium on prir.iitive 
art and the pleasures and perils of collecting. 

The last major area of involvement lias been the training in museum practices 
of interns from various universities firom around the country, Tlie training 
of volunteers (docents and other volunteers) continued, and we have worked 
out a number of organizational probleiTis which had existed between the various 
volunteer groups and the Museums, 

The challenges reriiain to broaden our prograriiming efforts so that we are able 
to reach a larger public with stimulating, high-quality programs wliich focus 
as closely as possible on the peiiiianent and temporary collections of the 
MuseuTiTS, 


Thomas K, Seligman 
Assistant Director 
Education Division 


- 19 - 


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DEPARTI-ISNT OF PUBLIC PROGRMS 


In the past year the Department of Public Programs has devoted much of its 
energies to exploring new avenues to programming, attempting on the one hand 
to develop projects which would closely support and enhance the Museums’ 
exhibition program, while on the other hand seeking out new emd untried 
projects in the performing arts* At the same time, the number of programs 
offered to the public has been maintained at the same level as the previous 
yetyr. Several projects stand out as exceptional or unusual and will be 
discussed individually. 

Continued Successes 


Organ concerts by staff organists Ludwig Altman and Newton Pashley continue 
to draw large and appreciative crowds at the Legion of Honor, This year, as 
in the past, both organists continued to perform every Saturday and Sunday 
afternoon and offered several programs enhanced by the participation of guest 
artists; choirs, vocal and instrumental soloists. Their program selections 
also reflected a particular effort this year to support the exhibition 
activities of the Museums. 

The Tvri-light Concerts series by the San Francisco Chamber Orchestra (Edgar J • 
Braun, Music Director) witnessed yet another season of overflow and capacity 
audiences. The previous year’s move from the de Yoimg to the Legion of Honor 
has resvilted in the Little Theater becoming the permanent home of these popular 
and critically successful events. 

Bay Area Playwrights Festival 

In October and November of 1976 the Program Office presented the first Bay Area 
Playwrights Festival in the Little Theater. The result of some 300 scripts 
submitted the previous year for a new one-act drama project, the Festival 
presented the world premieres of seven works by six regional authors in a six- 
week r-un. Artistic Director Robert V/oodruff personally directed a highly 
acclaimed production of a musical by Obie award winning author Sam Shepard 
entitled The Sad Lament of Pecos Bill , Other works presented in the Festival 
included The String Gatherer by Frederick Karl Van Patten, The Parasites by 
Ebbe Roe Smith, The Clown by V/ayne Pease, The Meter Beggar and The Parking 
Meter by Joel Witkin, and Passing Shots by screen writer Stephen Yafa, The 
Festival received overwhelming support of the press and the Bay Area theater 
community and is planned again for 1977-78, 

Toward Better Support of Exhibitions 

This year three major exhibitions were the motivation for special and/or 
unusual programming efforts by this office. The photographic exhibition on 
the City entitled As We V/ere, As We Are was complemented by two series of 
public programs. The first was a program of 12 lectures, forums and panel 
discussions by prominent Bay Area political, historical and civic figures on 
a variety of current and historical issues important in the City today. The 
second was a twelve week series of feature-length movies filmed in or about 
San Francisco between 1923 and 1975 • Both programs were developed in the 
Program Office with the assistance of Nancy Van Norman and Margo V/arnecke, 


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DEPARTflENT OF PUBLIC PROGPj^MS (Continued) 


For the exhibition Five Centuries of Tapestry , a series of performing arts 
programs was developed to parallel the exhibition and support its various 
themes. The programs opened on the e^diibition’s first day with four perform- 
ances by the excellent Medieval music ensemble Amici Musicae, and concluded 
with a conceirt of Baroque music for flute and harpsichord. One of the high 
points of the series was a set of eight performances by the San Francisco 
Actors Ensemble of a Medieval mystery play, enhancing the portion of the 
exhibition dealing with the mystery play and providing an excellent enter- 
tainment for the holiday season as well*, In conjunction with the exliibition 
Master-pieces of Primitive Art , the Program Office developed a series of 20 
films shovm on 10 consecutive Sunday afternoons, dealing vn.th the arts and 
anthropology of the cultures whose works were represented in the exhibition. 

For Children 

As a result of an inquiry from the Bay Area office of Yoxmg Audiences Inc,, 
a national organization dedicated to the development of londerstanding and 
appreciation of performing arts in young people, the Program Office offered 
a series of l6 Saturday afternoon performiances for children by a variety of 
Young Audiences’ performing ensembles. The programs ranged from classical 
music concerts to eastern European Folk dancing, and it was intended that 
the presence of these programs in an art museum would provide an especially 
rich environment for the children in the audience. The newly-formed San 
Francisco Attic Theater presented a series of eight performances of three 
plays on Saturday mornings at the Legion of Honor. San Francisco Attic 
Theater is dedicated to presenting fine quality theater for children, per- 
formed by children, V/e are presently negotiating with them for programs in 
1977-78. 

Reaching Out 

In cooperation with the San Francisco Park and Recreation Department and 
the San Francisco Guitar Society, a series of four concerts of guitar music 
was presented in the Little Thea-ter during the winter season. All four 
concerts saw capacity audiences and a new series if being discussed for 
1977-78, In addition, through a co-sponsorship arrangement between the 
Museum.s and several outside organizations, a number of other performing arts 
events was made available to the Museums* membership and to the public. 

These included the excellently received premiere performances by the new 
San Francisco Opera Piccola, a concert by the Reno (Nevada) Chamber Orchestra, 
an avant-garde theater piece from Los Angeles entitled Ethiopia , a -violin 
recital by San Francisco Symphony violinist Bruce Freifeld, a series of 
eleven performances by the v/idely acclaimed Sufi choir of Fairfax, and a 
fine recital by bass-baritone Vahan Toolajian, 


- 21 - 


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» » 

DEPAROIENT OF PUBLIC PROGRAMS (Continued) 


Miscellaneous 


In addition, the Program Office presented two lectures by Donelson Hoopes 
and George Hopper Fitch in conjunction with the exhibition of American 
Drawings and Water colors , a lecture by Edgar Munhall in conjunction with 
the Jean-Bap tiste Greuze exhibition, and a series of four showcase concerts 
by outstanding student musicians of the Bay Area, Receptions and/or dinner 
parties by a dozen outside organizations in the Museums were arranged and 
coordinated through the Program Office, and the Office assisted in the 
arrangements for and coordination of over 25 Museum Society and Museum- 
sponsored receptions, dinners, previews and luncheons. 

Charles Mills continued his involvement with the Volunteer Council, assist- 
ing in this year’s training for new volunteers as v/ell as revising the 
volunteer handbook for a second edition, Bruce Merley led the Program 
Office coordination of transportation for the 1977 meeting of the Association 
of Art Museum Directors (AAMD) in the Bay Area, and assisted in the arrange- 
ments for a two day seminar by UC Extension in conjunction with the exhibition 
Masterpieces of Primitive Art , and a two day International Tapestry Symposium 
at the Legion of Honor, Opening day celebrations were presented by the Pro- 
gram Office for the exhibitions As We Were, As We Are and Masterpieces of 
Primitive Art, 


Personnel 


James Baldocchi, an experienced theater technician, assumed the part-time 
position as theater manager/projectionist for the Museums, Nancy Van Norman 
worked in the Program Office, first as an intern from Lone Mountain College, 
later as an assistant on the programs for As ¥e Were, As VJe Are and on the 
A.A.M.D. meeting. Their contributions during the past year are gratefully 
acknowledged. 

Facilities 


More clearly than ever, this year demonstrated that the Little Theater at the 
Legion of Honor is in desparate need of renovation. Program after program, 
we were faced with the inadequacies of the lighting and sound systems. The 
old and largely poor quality curtains are literally disintegrating in front 
of our eyes. The recently refinished stage floor is now so thin (from count- 
less refinishings) that a particleboard superfloor originally intended to be 
temporary is now a permanent fixture. The carpeting is woefully beyond more 
cleaning; the house desperately needs repainting; the seating is nearly col- 
lapsing under our audiences. Clearly, it is doubtful that the Little Theater 
can endure another season of this level of programming in its present condition. 


- 22 - 


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Summary 

Programs presented in whole or in part through the Program Office, l^d.th 


attendance figures, are as follows; 

Number of 

Programs Type of Program Attendance 

62 Exhibition Eelated Programs 9982 

(lecture, film and performance) 

25 Childrens* Programs 2816 

19 Bay Area Playwrights Festival 2115 

5 Twilight Concerts 2521 

104 Organ Concerts 10^00 

7 Other Museum Sponsored Performing 5172 

Arts Programs 

22 Performing Arts Programs Presented 5500 


in Cooperation with Outside Organizations 

25 Museum Receptions, Dinners, Previews, etc, 

involving Program Office assistance 

12 Receptions and Dinners by Outside 

Organizations 

281 TOTAL 38506 


For a more complete listing of the 1976-77 activities of the Department 
of Public Programs, see Appendix 


Bruce Merley 
Charles Mills 
Assistant Curators 
Department of Public Programs 


- 23 - 


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* 


THE DE YOUNG MUSEUI4 ANT SCHOOL 


The de Young Museum Art School operates as a non-profit educational 
institution under the auspices of Hie Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. 
Two city employees v/ork in this department with the additional services 
provided by eighteen CETA employees. During the fiscal year 1976 to 1977 t 
The Art School operated children’s art classes at The San Francisco Zoo 
and the de Young Museum. Adult classes operated at the Dovmtown Center 
at 651 Howard Street. 

Studio art classes are offered to the public at a nominal fee im.thout 
pre-requisites and reqiiirements for enrollment. Four semesters of twelve 
weeks each offered sixty to eighty classes each semester, with a total 
student participation of over 3»000 students. 

The Art School operates two mobile units, The Trip-out Trucks, v/hich 
provide free studio art classes for the public schools and for community 
locations. 

Trip-out Trucks 1976-77 

Program: School Year 

2 trucks 3 days a \i?eek| 3 visits to each school 
Program; Summer 

2 trucks 2 days a week, 42 community visits 
4 city festivals, 67 schools 
1 class, 4 visits each 

14.816 school students 
8,000 community residents 

22.816 total for year 


A special summer project with teenagers was conducted at The Downto^m Center 
and the Exploratorium, Ten students worked as assistant artists, gallery 
attendants, helpers on the Trip~out Trucks and participated in a curriculum 
designed to train them for a vocation in the arts. This \vas supported by the 
National Endowment for the Arts; Expansion Arts and the Neighborhood Youth 
Corps ^ 

Video and Film Production 


The Art School has brought its semd-ces to a v/ider community by producing 
video tapes and films about studio art processes. 

During the fiscal year the following programs were produced; 

- "Save Me; The Making of a Lithograph.’’ Designed to complement an exhibit at 
the Downtown Center, this 15-minute videotape documents the process of 
creating a lithograph from drawing on the stone to printing an edition. 


- 24 - 


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I 




THE DE YOUNG MSETO4 ART SCPIOOL (Continued) 


- ’’Four Years Later: Rockefeller Fellowsliips in Museum Education," 

Made possible by grants from the National Endownent for the Arts and 

The Rockefeller Foundation, this videotape explores the education programs, 
aspirations and frustrations of museum professionals v/ho participated in 
the Rockefeller Training Program in Museum Education and Community Studies. 

- "Ooze-Vi/ho, " an animated film, explains how a lump of clay becomes a 
utilitarian object, 

Tv/o additional videotapes are nearj.ng completion: one about paper conserv- 
ation, the other on hov/ to use video in a small museum. These tapes are 
intended for arts organizations and small musexmis. The project is funded 
by an NEA grant. 

The Film and Video Department has also produced a variety of education com- 
ponents for exhibits at The Downtovm Center. These include a slide show 
about Hollywood movies, a circus soundtrack and a video collage of 1950’ s 
television programs. Ceramic demonstrations have been videotaped and are 
available for vie\d.ng by Art School students. Video workshops are held for 
students as well as staff members and interns, 

Downtov/n Art Center - 65 I Hov/ard Street 

The major efforts of the Art School staff during this fiscal year have gone 
into establishing an exhibition program id.th educational services in the 
domtown business community. An estimated 89,000 persons have used the 
facility during this fiscal year, visiting the following exhibitions or 
participating in the supportive services: 

July - August: The Foot Show 

An exhibit of painting, photographs, prints and artifacts associated 
v/ith the foot. Free lectures and demonstrations included: building a 
shoe, free foot examination, a performance by a Foot Stamping Band, 
a tap dancer and films, 

August - September: The Eyes Have It 

An exhibit about photography including antique cameras and v/orks by 
local artists. Demonstrations and lectures included: hand tinting of 
photos, photograras, pin-hole cameras, rubber stamps and printing process 
without darkroom, 

September - October: Artist’s Proof/^lultiple Image 

An exhibit about printmaking, V/orks of old masters and local artists 
dealing with the process of lithography, etching, and serigraphy. 
Lectures on the history and collecting of prints. Demonstrations 
included etching and lithography, screen prints, mono-prints, embossed 
prints, 3-dimensional printmaking, care and handling of prints, matting 
and framing. 




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♦ 


THE DE YOUNG iroSEUM AET SCHOOL (Continued) 

November - December: Tne Greatest Little Show on Earth 

An exhibition of antique toys and circus posters based on circus 
themes. There were toy workshops given by Art School instructors. 

At this time a second exhibit of antique toys, "A is for Animal”, 
was organized at the Legion of Honor, 

January - February: Ceram-a-rama 

An exhibition of ceramic work by local Bay Area artists. 

March - April: V/all to V/all Paper 

An exhibition of art v/ork on or with paper by contemporary Bay Area 
artists. Demonstrations included: paper sculpture, paper making 
and kite making, 

April - May - June: The Moving Picture Show 

An exhibit that e^cplored the relationship between the moving image 
and its influence on society. Demonstrations included animation 
films, holography and laser demonstrations. 

Museum Training Program 

In February of 1977 seven persons were recruited from the Western United 
States to participate in a museum training program emphasizing museum 
education. This project is in its fourth year and is funded by the Rocke- 
feller Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, Training fellov;- 
ships l^^ere awarded to persons from Davis; San Jose; Los Angeles; San Fran- 
cisco Bay Area; Fairbanks, Alaska; Honolulu; Reno; and Phoenix. The training 
consists of seminars conducted by museum professionals coupled vi-th actual 
work exp)erience at The Downtown Center, Fellows use their skills as educators 
and curator^ to develop exhibitions and programs for a city audience. 


- 26 - 




♦ 


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DOCEHT comrciL 




# 


The purpose of the Docent Council^ a volunteer organization, is to provide 
tirained docents to give tours of the Museur.is ’ collections and special ex- 
hibitions through prograns developed in cooperation I'lith the Education 
Departmnts of the Asian Art Museum and The Fine Arts Museums of San Fran- 
cis co« The supporting organization for the Docent Council is The l^useui.! 
Society, The veiy successful Deaf Program was sponsored this year by a 
grant from the San Francisco Foundation, Ihe Docent Council strives to 
present the best possible Museum experience for the visitor through pro- 
grams daiipisd for ad'iiLtS 5 school diildren and special groups including 
senior citizens, the deaf and the liandicapped. Docents also provide 
additional special services such as research, conservation projects and 
work in the library, slide library and Registrar’s office of The Fine Arts 
l^useums. 


This year advanced training sessions on the permanent collections xmxe held 
for all AOA, Asian and Western Art Docents in the form of lectures^ technic^e, 
tour planning and evaluation sessions were continually held for those Docents 
participating in the school and deaf prograraa. Docents were also trained for 
the six special exhibitions presented by the Museums this year: 


A Decade of Collecting 

Cliinese Follcarb 

Five Centuries of Tapestry 

American Ifester Drawings and 

Waterc'olors 

Jean-Baptiste Greuze / 1725-180^ 

^sterpieces of Primitive Art 


Asian Art Miseum 
Asian Art l&seum 
Tlie Fine Arts I^seums 

The Fine Arts Museums 
The Fine Arts Museums 
The Fine Arts Museums 


The school program has been very active this year providing two to three 
programs for school oLasses per ireek each in the Asian, Western and AOA 
collections. Special worlcshops for teachers were planned and presented 
by each area to introduce school teachers to the Museums ’ programs and to 
help thera integrate the Musemi visit into their planned classroom curricilum. 
The Docents for the Deaf have developed an enriching school program including 
in-school preparation and use of art materials in presenting carefully planned 
tours for deaf children tliroughout tlie Museums, 


General tours of the collections have continued on a daily schedule: three 
in the Asian Art Museum, two in the Western collections and one in the AOA 
Galleiy, Additionally daily tours were provided for the six special exhibitions 
mentioned above. Monthly adult general tours focusing on particular aspects of 
the colLectiona were given for the deaf community. The Docent Council also 
provides tours by appointment for special groups including visitors to the Bay 
Area, college classes, senior citizens and others. This, year tiro special series 
were prepared and presented by Docents for a particular group. 


- 27 - 


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DOCENT COUNCIL (Continued) 


The most iriiporbant job of the Docent Council administration this year has 
been to bring the Docent Council frora its independent role in the Museums^ 
to one closely tied to the Education Departments of the Asian Art Mirseura 
and The Fine Arts Miseums. The volunteer Docents are providing an important 
and unique part in the interpretation of the collections to the public* 

New l^laij® and Standing Rules were developed to specify clearly the role of 
the Docent Council in the Museums* 

The Docent Council looks fortfard to e:xpanding its programs and continuing 
its high goal of excellence in service to the Museums and the visiting public# 
Many thanlcs go to the Docent Council, its Board of Directors and the staff of 
the Museuri® for our successful programs this year# 


Mrs# J# Alec Merriara 
Chairman 

Docent Council of the Asian Art 
Museur.i and ilie Fine Arts Museums 
of San Francisco 


Docent Council Tours 


Tours p:iven 


Visitors 


Asian Art Museum 


General 

School 


1125 

289 


14170 


The Fine Arts Museums 


Western Collections 
General 
School 


1^90 

142 


25622 

2506 


AOA Gallery 
General 
School 


507 

129 


5114 

2289 


Deaf Program: Asian Art Museum and The Fine Arts Museums 


General 

Special 

School 


3 

16 


292 

152 

513 


♦ 




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DEPARTMENT OF INTERPRETATION 


The Department of Interpretation is concerned with helping to make the 
museum experience enjoyable, educational, and comprehensible. To this 
end, the department v;orks with other members of the staff in order to 
produce the material and tours used to supplement both the permanent 
collection and the temporary exhibitions. A partial listing of the 
interpretive aspects in a museum includes: orientation areas, labels, 
catalogues, brochures, hand-outs, guides, audio-visual shoivs, and docent, 
acoustical, and self-guided tours. 

Since I arrived in mid-February, I have been involved in the development 
and production of the interpretive material for most of the exhibitions 
held in the museums. This includes working v/ith the docents on their 
programs, training, recruiting, and tour techniques. In addition, I have 
prepared a new Gallery Guide to assist the visitor tlirough the galleries 
and answer pertinent questions. 

In the coming year, in addition to our on-going work, major efforts will 
be made to add nev/ interpretive labelling to our permanent collection. 
This will be accomplished with the assistance of several volunteers. 

We will also work tov/ards expanding our facilities for the handicapped 
and disadvantaged and enlarging the nTimber of docent-guided school tours 
and programs. 


Renee Beller Dreyfus 
Assistant Curator for 
Education and Interpretation 




♦ 


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♦ 




DEPAEMM OF INTEKPESTATION - Western School Program 


The Western (European and American) School Progran comprises twenty-five 
Docents including ten new graduates, supervised by a Museum Teaching 
Assistant, The program is based on the premise that the museum setting 
provides an environment which offers a great variety of learning experiences. 
Knowledge of the visual arts is emphasized. Students learn to identify the 
elements of art and they discover the meaning of artistic expression in the 
CLiltures in which the objects were created. In addition to gaining sldLlls 
in these areas, students are encouraged to express their aesthetic feelings 
and opinions about a work of art and to share those feelings with their 
peers. This experience sets a pattern for museum-going that is both natural 
and personally satisfying. 

In order to staff this program, a rigorous training is offered by the 
Museum Teaching Assistant in charge in conjunction with outside lecturers. 

The Teaching Assistant offers a v/ide variety of teaching techniques to be 
used in the galleries and there is ample opportunity for each of the trainees 
to utilize the techniques v/ith a variety of learning objectives, VJhen the 
training is completed the Docent feels able to handle any student from 
grades 1 through 12, Constant evaluation and supervision is offered. 

The program endeavors to work closely with teachers, the School District and 
other museums providing an expanded learning situation for the students, 
leaving behind the traditional field trip conception of a museum visit, 

Barbara Fields 


- 30 - 




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I 


I 


DEPARTMENT OF INTERPRETATION - A.O.A, School Program 


The A.O.A, School Program consists of parti ciioatory gallery experiences 
offered several mornings a week for classes (grades 2-12) and workshops 
for teachers. The Program is staffed by approximately twenty- five Docents 
(including eighteen trainees who begin training in September 1977) and the 
Museum Teaching Assistant, Hie Docents are responsible for the planning 
and giving of tours; the Museum Teaching Assistant supervises the overall 
Program, schedules the tours, and assists the Docents in planning and 
evaluation of the gallery experiences. The Teacliing Assistant acts as a 
resource for method and content and contributes to the training of Docents 
to focus on the development of skills necessary to guide the students in 
visual and cultural av/areness. In addition, the To iching Assistant maintains 
a working relationship \d.th teachers and resource persons in the San Fran- 
cisco Unified School District, through the planning of teacher v\;orkshops. 

The A,0,A, School Program operates V7ith a keen sense of responsibility to 
the students and teachers of the San Francisco Unified School District and 
their needs. The nature of the museum learning environi'nent and the A,0,A, 
material directs our efforts: to guide the students to visually experience 
and respond to the art, to eqTiip the students to "read" the objects' cultural 
meaning in order to expand their own world view, and to foster a respect for 
the cultures of the A,0,A, peoples in students of V/estern as well as non- 
Wes tern background. 

Of counse, the most basic objective of the Program is to make each student 
feel welcome, to find pleasure as he/she learns in the museum, Tlie attain- 
ment of this objective is well evidenced by the increasing demand to par- 
ticipate in our Program, 

Morgan KinLla 


- 31 - 






-. ; '..■ o''?'- -'O:" ; 

^ o'.o' I 7 :• ri ' 

■ ir. 






A. 0. A, 

, GALLERIES 

APPENDi: 


Q 

1 

TOUPuS 

Tours 

Guests 

July 1, 

1976 to Sept. 30, 1976 

99 

1,017 

Oct. 1, 

1976 to Dec. 31, 1976 

9k 

663 

Jan. 1, 

1977 to Mar. 31, 1977 

100 

779 

April 1, 

, 1977 to June 30, 1977 

97 

1,021 


Totals 

390 

3, ^ 1-80 


MASTERPIECE INTRODUCTORY TOURS 


March, 1977 

19 

216 

April 1 to June 30, 1977 

113 

1,844 


13^ 

2,060 

All Tour Totals 

524 

5,54o 


- 32 - 


f 


.0 .A 


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...IfirtoJ' 


PUBLICATIONS DEPARTIffiNT 


The Publications Department, funded by The Museum Society, is responsible for 
all aspects of the Museums’ publishing program from completion of final 
manuscript through bound book, ensuring timely, high-quality, minimal-budget 
exhibition and permanent collection catalogxies. As head of this Department, 
the Publications Manager may also coordinate the efforts of authors and editors 
in final preparation of the manuscript, develop book formats and parameters, 
and help prepare finding applications and author contracts. 

After obtaining bids in all areas of book production, the Manager awards con- 
tracts and coordinates the work of copyeditors, designers, typesetters and 
printers. He also supervises such details of production as permission requests, 
photography, copyrights and captions, Tlie Manager arranges for the marketing, 
distribution and co-publishing of museum-produced publications. 

Besides being responsible for routine management of the Department and prepar- 
ation of its budgets, the Publications Manager reports to various trade 
publications, monitors book inventories, develops pricing and inventory 
strategies, considers legal aspects of museum publications, evaluates bills 
for payment, and provides publishing advice to staff and otitside parties. 

He also works on various studies and projects: permissions policy, royalty 
policy, membership benefits, calendar evaluations, postcards, the Annual Report 
and the like. 

Projects Completed 

Exhibition Catalogues: 

AMERICA OBSERVED: EDV/ARD HOPPER AND V/ALKER EVANS (September 1976) 

AS V/E IffiRE, AS WE ARE (October 1976) 

FIVE CENTURIES OF TAPESTRY IN THE FINE ARTS MUSEUMS OF SAN FRANCISCO 
(November 1976) 

Projects in Progress 

Exhibition Catalogues: 

THE TRIWIPH OF HUMANISM (October 1977) 

ACTS OF THE TAPESTRY SYMPOSIUM— Post-exhibition (January 1978) 

Permanent Collection Catalogues: 

FOUR CENTURIES OF FRENCH DRAWINGS IN THE FINE ARTS MUSEUMS OF 
SAN FRANCISCO (September 1977) 

RODIN’S SCULPTURE: A CRITICAL STUDY OF THE SPPuECKELS COLLECTION 
(September 1977) 

A TRIBUTE TO V/ALTER HEIL (November 1977) 

Future Projects 

Exhibition Catalogue: 

ART OF THE HUICHOL (October 1978) 

Permanent Collection Catalogues: 

FLEMISH PAINTINGS IN THE FINE ARTS MUSEUI4S OF SAN FRANCISCO (June 1978) 
FRENCH PAINTINGS IN THE FINS ARTS MUSEUMS OF SAN FRANCISCO (January 1979) 

Currently the Publications Manager works three days a week and coordinates the 
efforts of four part-time volunteers; regular, professional support services are 
badly needed. 


- 33 - 


Edward T, Engle, Jr, 
Publications Manager 


( 


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VOLUNTEER COUNCIL 


A group of 266 active volunteers donated their time to special exhibits 
held in The Fine Arts Museums. They acted as Merabersliip/lnformation 
specialists, sold tickets at the entrance to exliibits and assisted in 
Museum bookshops. In the past year they took on the added responsibility 
of distributing posters before major shows. 

Total hoiirs contributed per exhibition are as follows: 

The Tapestry Exhibition at the Legion of Honor over 2,260 volunteer hours 

Greuze & The American Master Drawing Sixhibition over 2,050 volunteer hours 

Masterpieces of Primitive Art , de Young Museum over 2,010 volunteer hours 

total of over 6,320 volunteer hours. 

Training and Orientation Sessions were completed by 53 volunteers. The 
sessions were held at the de Young and Legion of Honor Museums over a three-day 
period. After a welcome by Director Ian VJhite and President of the Board, 

Walter Newman, the group broke off into v/orkshop teams and studied volunteer 
procedures under the direction of the Volunteer Co-ordinator, 

Office assistant volunteers performed a variety of tasks ranging from typing 
to envelope stuffing in the offices of the Director, Exhibition & Conservation, 
the Library, Public Relations, Publications, The Museum Society, and the 
Program Office, The group also assisted in distribution of mtiseum surveys 
conducted over the past year. 


Ola Kupka 

Volunteer Coordinator 


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ADMIMISTRATIOM DI^/ISION 


As one of the three major divisions \ri.thin the Museiiras, the Administrative 
Division is responsible for the preparation and administration of the City 
budget, personnel, maintenance, security of the buildings and collections, 
development of ne^^r sources of funding, and generally for the coordination 
of activities within the Museums’ three major divisions. This past year I 
have been responsible for the planning, administration and coordination of 
the complex de Yoimg renovation project, an exciting project which will serve 
many needs of the Museums, 

Security 

The security staff is responsible for the safety of art objects, visitors 
and the two buildings (including the Asiaiji. Art Museum), Our guard force 
was supplemented by an average of 11 CETa"’' personnel. Considering the 
high attendance and low average number of guards per gallery, theft or 
major damage was minimal. If it were not for the extensive renovation 
being conducted at the de Young Museum, causing us to close large areas 
of the museum, we might have had to close sections of the museum to the 
public so that other areas could be more adequately secured. 

As a way of minimizing the threat of vandalism, reflectionless glass has 
been installed in a large number of paintings. The Denovation Project 
created a more seciire service entrance to the de Young Museum, Ihere, a 
guard station was constructed with complete control of the vehicular and 
pedestrian access to the museijras. This new design greatly increases our 
internal security. 

Personnel 


The Museums have been greatly aided by CETA guards, clerks, prepara tors 
and community workers, V/ithout this help, we would certainly have had 
difficulty maintaining the present level of public service, V/e continue 
to have difficulty filling key curatorial positions due to salary levels 
which are behind other museums, locally and nationally. The salary im- 
balance between certain Museum positions and other City employees con- 
tinues to create a situation of low morale. 

The Museums also suffer from the lack of curatorial depth in various 
departments. Basic clerical staff is now so thin as to impose great hard- 
ships during absences due to illnesses or vacations. Even more discourag- 
ing is having curators, conservators, registrars and the like spending 
their valuable time doing routine clerical work, 

1, CETA is a federally funded work training program. 


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Administration Division (Continued) 


On the positive side, the Museum Society, through direct financial aid 
and volunteers, has provided additional personnel support. The staff 
chart illustrates the in^ortance of this help. The chart does not show 
the 50 new volunteers who v/ork for the Museum on a daily basis in all 
facets of museum operations. We are grateful for their support. 

Physical Plant 


The two antiquated buildings continue to require massive transfusions of 
maintenance and repair dollars. The heavy public usage also takes its 
toll on the buildings. Poor ventilation and the lack of air conditioning 
is now our major concern; it threatens the very existence of the art 
objects. Also excessive amounts of natizral light in some galleries, com- 
bined with too little artificial light in others, plagues the exhibition 
of our collection; the one deteriorates most art objects, and the other 
limits proper viewing. 

The major Renovation Project at the de Young Museum was partially completed 
this year. The new American Galleries were to open on July 4. The new 
Cafe de Young was opened and has been steadily growing in popularity. 

New shops and design studios as well as staff offices were renovated. 

The Art School was preparing to move into its new quarters at year's end. 
For more detailed description of the renovation project, see last year's 
Annual Report. 

The entrances to both Museum buildings continue to provide architectural 
barriers to the physically handicapped. Ramps are needed to remedy this 
situation, A temporary wooden one was installed at the Legion of Honor 
last year, but because of certain physical limitations, the costs of a 
temporary ramp at the de Young are prohibitive, A ramp for the de Young 
was requested in the City budget, but eventually was deleted as not having 
high enough citywide priority. 

Budget 

Although our budget was increased slightly, v;e continue to look to other 
sources of revenue as well as examining our programming. If our basic 
operating budget cannot provide adequate personnel and support funds, we 
id.ll be unable to maintain private interest in the museums as we would be 
forced to decrease the number of exhibitions in special programs. Last 
year, the Museum Society's budget was approximately SJl million. 

Admissions 

In August 1975 the Board of Trustees decided to institute an admission 
charge rather than suffer a major budget cut proposed by the Board of 
Supervisors, It was implemented December 1, 1975* The Museiims are open 
every day of the year from 10:00 to 5:00 PM, For persons age 18-65 
admission is 750, persons age 12-l8, 250; persons under 12 or over 65, 
Museum Society members. Society for Asian Art members, Museum Trustees, 


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Administration Division (Continued) 


other museum professionals, members of ICON, AAM, V/AAM, AAMD and BAGAC, 
guests as may be determined by the Museums, and members of organized 
educational groups, including the person in charge, are free. Payment 
of one fee covers admission to the Asian Art MuseiM, M*H, de Young Memorial 
Museum and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor on the same day. 
Admission is free on the first day of the month. The Museum Society may 
charge a separe.te fee for admission to Museiim Society sponsored special 
exhibitions and events. 

The attendance at the California Palace of the Legion of Honor last year 
was 216,4^3 and the de Young Museum was 433j587 for a yearly total of 
652 , 030 , See appendix VII for the museums’ admission fund statement of 
revenues and expenditures. 

Development 

The Development Office tliis year was successful in obtaining funds for a 
number of major projects. The American Galleries installation v/as com- 
pleted vriLth the aid of private contributions and Foundations and Federal 
grants. The Dovmtown Center obtained sufficient funding to continue as a 
branch gallery of the museum for 1978-79* In addition the museums v/ere 
awarded grants for special exhibitions, and internship in decorative arts 
conservation, special video and out reach projects for the de Young Museum 
Art School, and for equipment for new conservation laboratories at the 
de Young, 

Tliis year sav; an evolution in the structure of the development effort with 
the creation of a joint committee for development of The Fine Arts Museiims 
Trustees and the Museum Society, This committee will be charged with the 
launching of a capital campaign later in 1977* The smaller Core Committee 
for development has also been organized. It meets monthly to review needs 
and prospects and malce assignments for short term fund raising. 

With the patient help of The Fine Arts Museums staff a Five Year Plan was 
updated and presented in programmatic form to the Development Coraraittee. 

The plan prioritized the future needs and goals of the museimi and deter- 
mined five year cost projections in the areas of capital improvements, 
personnel, programs, acquisitions, and equipment, A list of grant activities 
appear in Appendix VIH, 


Ronald Egherman 

Assistant Director Administration 


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♦ 


PUBLIC IMFOMTION OFFICE 

The functioning of the Public Infonmtion Office iras seriously ii.ipaired in 
October when the City, due to its financial crisis, deleted funds to retain 
the Museuns * outside public relations consultant. Application xxas mde to 
the Chief Adi.iinistrative Officer for advertising and pronotion funds fron 
the hotel tax to restore the previous level of service. Action on the re- 
quest had not been taken by the end of the fiscal year, leaving the Public 
Informtion Office ilth no staff, no budget and no professional assistance. 

Hie year’s record tras not entirely negative by any r, leans, hoxrever, Canpaigns 
on belialf of such exhibitions as As ¥e Were , As We Are and Five Centuries of 
Tapestry produced a high level of interest locally and, in the case of the 
Tapestry exliibition, internationally. 

The new gallery of arts of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rone was i/ell received 
in the press, and at the end of the year the extensive renovation of the 
de Young Museun and the opening of the new galleries ef Anerican art were 
announced. 

The Public Informtion Office gave assistance in publicizing the schedule of 
exhibitions and events at the Downtown Art Center, an additional facet of the 
I-liseuns » operations, 

Tlie sar.ie sort of service was provided for the music, draria, dance and other 
events produced by tlie Program Department, a service previously provided by 
the outside public relations consultant,. Activities of the Docent Council, 
including those related to Asian art, were publicized. The exliibition of 
American Pfeister Draidrigs and Watercolors was received with an unprecedented 
amount oi coverage for an exhi^bition of worlcs of art on paper. 

Posters for major exhibitions were distributed by a group of volunteers led 
by Mrs, Eruce Dohrr^iann and I^Ir, Robert Ross, who have produced a detailed plan 
to expedite future poster distribution. Television spot announcaments were 
produced free of charge for the tJuseuns by Mr, Edgar Spizel and by KRON 
television. The announcement donated by Mr, Spizel is a general promotion 
of the Legion of Honor, and the KROH spot was on behalf of the tapestry ex- 
hibition," -These valuable public service contributions were accepted with 
gratitude, 

Tlie Public Inforr.iation Officer, who is responsible for setting fees for re- 
production rights to Museuia-dimed objects, negotiated a royalty arrangement 
•with J, Pansu Tapisseries of France for use of the Museums* name in advertising 
a tapestry reproduction related to a tapestry in the Museums ’ collection, the 
first such arrangement in the his-tory of the Museui,is, 

The inval-uable volunteer assistance of Susan Booth is gratefully acloiowledged, 

Cliarles D, Long- 

Public Information Officer 


- 39 - 


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no-o io/o 


THE MUSEUM SOCIETY 


% 


i 


The Museum Society, as the membership organization serving The Eine Arts 
Museums of San Francisco and The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, con- 
tinued its support during 1976-77 of a wide variety of exhibitions, pub- 
lications, educational programs and other activities at the California 
Palace of the Legion of Honor, the M, H, de Yoxmg Memorial Musetira and the 
Asian Art Museum, 

The following Directors served as Officers of the Museum Society Board 
during 1976-77 i 

Chairman: V/illiam Stanton Picher 
First Vice-Chairman: John Lowell Jones 
Second Vice-Chairman: Mrs, G, Gordon Beilis 
Treasurer: Richard W, Goss, II 
Secretary: Mrs, Joachim Bechtle 

Museum Society committee chairmen during 1976-77 were: 

By-laws: Edwin J, Mejia 
Development: Richard Slottow 

Education: Benjamin J, Henley, Jr. (representative to FAI4 committee) 

Finance: Richard V/, Goss, II 

Membership: Mrs, Frederick littii bridge 

Nominating: Mrs, Launce E, Gamble 

Personnel: Mrs, V/illiara I4acColl, Jr, 

Program: Mrs, William H, McICLeroy 
Publications: Mrs, Dixon V/ecter 
Shops and Services; Mrs, Laxmce S, Gamble 
Travel: Mrs, V/illiam MacColl, Jr, 

At the Society’s Annual Meeting of Members on May l6, 1977 the following 
were elected as Directors for six-year terras until May 19835 

Elizabeth Bogart (Mrs. Johnson S,) 

Robert J, Bransten 

Patsy Jo Hilliard (Mrs. Asa G,, III) 

Fred Martin 

V/illiam A, Stimson, II 

Lita di Grazia Vietor (Mrs, John A.) 

Florence S, V/ong (Mrs, George S.) 

At its March 23, 1977 meeting, the Board of Directors appointed R. Lockwood 
Tower to the Board to complete the iinexpired terra of Charles Griswold, On 
June 15j 1977 the Board appointed Charles J, Patterson as a Director to 
complete the unexpired term of Mrs, Joseph '/. Cochran, II, 


- 40 - 


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♦ 


i 


THE MSEUM SOCIETY (Continued) 

I. PERSONNEL .APPOINTJ'IETra (MUSEIB'I SOCIETY STAFF) 

Cynthia E. Ziegler appointed Membership Assistant, June 23 » 1977. 


II. MBEPvSHIP 


A, Individual Memberships, as of June 30 ^ 1977 


Category and dues 

Junior (5^10) 693 

Senior (^10) 2,276 

Active ('^20) 9? 33^ 

Contributing (^^30) 1,669 

Sustaining (+J50) 6^7 

Supporting ($100) 239 

Donor ($230) 23 

Sponsor ($300) 10 

Guarantor ($1,000) 1 

Life/Benefactor (one-time payment of 64 

$300 and upj discontinued category) 

Patron ($l,000/year for 10 years) 73 


Total paid memberships: 13,049 

Honorary Members 9 

Complimentary Members 120 


Total membership; 13,178 


Corporate Memberships, as of June 30. 1977 

American Potato Co, 

Bank of America Foimdation 
Bechtel Corporation 
Edward A. Bonnelli & Associates 
Booz, Allen & Hamilton, Inc, 

Bronson, Bronson & McKinnon 
Bryan International Travel, Inc, 
Butterfield & Butterfield (Complimentary) 
Castle & Cooke, Inc, 

Citizens Savings & Loan Association 
Coldv/ell Banker & Co. 

Coopers 8c Lybrand 
H. S, Crocker Co,, Inc, 

Crocker National Bank 
Crown Zellerbach 
Dodge 8c Cox 

Firemen’s Fund American Insurance Co. 
Flax’s 

Industrial Indemnity Co, 

Marsh 8c McLennan, Inc. 

McKinsey 8c Co,, Inc, 

Natomas Comioany 
Pacific Gas 8c Electric 


- 4l - 


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THE MSEUM SOCIETY (Continued) 


Corporate Membersliips (Continued ) 

Potlatch Corporation 
Damon Peike & Company- 

Retail Dry Goods Association of San Francisco 
Rosenberg Capital Management 
Schlage Lock Co, 

Secizrity Pacific National Bank 
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill 
Spreckels Sugar Division, Amstar Corp. 

Standard Oil of California 
States Steamship Co, 

Stauffer Chemical Co, 

Syntex Corporation 
Transamerica Corporation 

Union Sugar Division, Consolidated Foods Co, 

United California Bank 
Vestaur Corporation 
Wells Fargo Bank 
V/ilbur-Ellis/Connell Bros, 

Dean Witter & Co, 

Arthur Young & Co, 

III. THE MUSEUli SOCIETY AUXILIARY Chairman: Mrs. Richard Otter 

The Museum Society Auxiliary’s fund-raising event this year was a "Picnic- 
Rama" on March 1, 1977 at the home of one of the Auxiliary members. The 
event netted The Auxiliary also handled arrange-ments for the 

annual Family Holiday Party at the de Yo-ung on December 12, 1976, Through 
its fund-raising efforts in this and previous years, the Auxiliary has 
contributed ^65,000 tov/ard the new American Galleries at the de Young, and 
an additional S30,000 pledge will be paid over the next three years, 

IV. SUBURBAN ATOCILIARIES 

The three suburban Auxiliaries, organized in recent years under Auxiliary 
sponsorship to stimulate interest in the Museums and the Society, had 
active programs in 1976-77« Chairmen for these groups were: 

Belvedere- Tiburon Ausciliary: Mrs, James Derryberry 
Hillsborou^ Auxiliary: ^Irs, D, W, Furbee 
Ross Auxiliary: Mrs, Jason Tuttle 

The Ross Auxiliary organized a fund-raising nine-course African Dinner at 
the Willis Gallery in San Francisco on March 28, 1977* IL-e event netted 
Si j 272 for the acquisitions fund of the Department of Africa, Oceania and 
the Americas. 


- 42 - 


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MUSEUM SOCIETY (Continued) 

SUBURBAN AUXILIARIES (Continued) 

Seven programs, followed by luncheon, for members of the three suburban 
Auxiliaries and their guests, were held during the year: 

October 28, 1976: A lecture by Haomas K, Seligman on ''Continuities in 
African Aesthetics from Market Place to Masquerades," de Young Museum. 
(Hillsborough Aiuciliary) 

December 1, 1976; A lecture and gallery tour by Anna Bennett of the 
exhibition Five Centuries of Tapestry , Legion of Honor. (Belvedere- 
Tiburon, Hillsborough and Ross Ainciliaries) 

March 17. 1977? A gallery lectiire tour by Robert Flynn Johnson on the 
exhibition American Master Drawings and Natercolors , and a lecture by 
Mrs, V/anda Corn on the exhibition Jean-Baptiste Greuze/ 1723~l803 i 
Legion of Honor, (Belvedere-Tiburon and Hillsborough Auxiliaries) 

March 23, 1977: A lecture and gallery tour by Thomas K, Seligman on 
the exhibition Masterpieces of Primitive Art , de Young Museum. 

(Ross Auxiliary) 

May 3, 1977 t A lecture and gallery tour by Thomas K, Seligman on the 
exhibition Masterpieces of Primitive Art , de Young Museum, (Hillsborough 
Auxiliary) 

May 11, 1977 : A lecture by Thomas P. Lee on "Tlie Unknovm Louis" followed 
by a gallery tour of the permanent collection French Painting under Louis 
XIII , Legion of Honor, (Ross Auxiliary) 

May 24, 1977? A lecture by Virginia Watkins, Visitng Lecturer, Doshisha 
Vtoraen*s College, Kyoto, and Occidental College, Los Angeles on "Shinto 
and Buddhist Treasures of Japan," The Tiburon Playhouse, Tiburon. 
(Belvedere-Tiburon Auxiliary) 

V. GRAPHIC ARTS COUNCIL Chairman: George A. Poole, Jr. 

llie name of the Bay Area Graphic Arts Council was changed to the Graphic 
Arts Council at the Annual Business meeting on May 24, 1977. At that 
time a nev/ Chairman, V/alter C, Goodman, was elected to succeed George A, 
Poole, Jr. 

Events for Council members in 1976-77 included: 

September 10, 1976; Reception in honor of the exhibitions America 
Observed; Edward Hopper - Walker Evans and Ja'nes Torlakson Prints at 
the Legion of Honor, 

October 23, 1976: Lecture by Betsy G. Fryberger on the Piranesi ex- 
hibition at the Stanford Art Museum. 


- 43 - 


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MUSEUM SOCIETY (Continued) 


GR/iPHIC ARTS COUNCIL (Continued) 

October 29 < 1976; Reception in honor of the exhibition David Lance 
Goines: Posters 1968-1976 at the Legion of Honor, 

February 24, 1977 i Reception in honor of the exhibition American Master 
Drawings and V/atercolors at the Legion of Honor, 

May 24, 1977: General Meeting of the Graphic Arts Council, 

A portfolio of four etchings, ’’Homage to Boudin” by Elizabeth Quandt, 
was purchased from Graphic Arts Council fu^.ds for the Achenbach Foundation. 

VI, VOLUNTEER COUNCIL Chairman: Mrs, V/, Robert Phillips 

Museum Society volunteers were again very active in many areas of the 
Museums* operations this year: exiiibition staffing, Museum curatorial 
departments and administrative offices, Membership Desks at both Museums 
and clerical assistance in the membership processing section of the Museum 
Society office. Please see the Volunteer Council section of the Museums’ 
Annual Report for a more detailed description of this Council. 

VII, DOCENT COUNCIL Chairman: Mrs. J. Alec Merriam 

Hie Museum Society continued to serve as the financial guarantor of the 
Docent Council and to administer its accounts. Please refer to the Docent 
Council section of the Museums’ Annual Report for a complete report on the 
Docent Council’s activities. 

VIII, OTHER PROJECTS: SHOPS AND SERVICES Chairman: Mrs. Launce E. Gamble 

The Museum Society continued its sponsorship of the two Bookshops at the 
de Young Museum and the Legion of Honor, as well as the Salvage Shop at 
1967 Jackson Street, The Society is also responsible for contracting for 
a catering service to manage the Cafe Chanticleer at the Legion of Honor 
and the newly-opened Cafe de Young. 


See Appendix for ACTIVITIES SUPPORTED BY THE MUSEUl-I SOCIETY and 
EXPENDITURES ON BEHALF OF THE MUSEUMS, 


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APPENDIX I 


ACHSIffiACH FOUNDATION 
Ptirchase Acquisitions: Prints 


Brooke Alexander Inc. 

New York 

P. emd D, Colnaghi, Ltd. 
London 


Sichard HAMILTON, En^^lish contemporary, 
Kent State , serifjraph. 

Sin.on-Qiarles 14IGER. French, 1736-1820, 
Portrait of Hubert llobert , after Isabey. 
etching and engraving. 

iCLois SENEFELDER. German, 1771-183^? 
Portrait of Jacques-Louis David . 

lithograph, 

Felix BRACQUEMOND, French, 1833-191^. 
Engine Delacroix . B,27. etching, 

Pierre-Roch VIGNERON, French, 1789-1872. 
Anne-Lonis Girodet-Trioson . 1825. 
lithograioh. 

Alphonse MASSON, French, l8l4-l898, 
J.A.D, Ingres , after the self portrait, 
etching and engraving. 


Alphone LEGROS. French, 1837-1911. 

Self Portrait , B.4l2, etching and drypoint- 

Victoria Keilus Dailey Charles MERYON, French, I82I-I868, 

Los Angeles Le Pont-au- Change, l854,D,V/,34/vii. 

(Elizabeth Ebert and Arthur Barney touched proof, etching. 

Fund) 


Anthony Dav/son 
London 


Natasha Nicholson Garver 
San Francisco 


Gropper Art Gallery Inc. 
I7est Somerville, Mass, 


Elisabeth von HOLLSBEN, German contemp- 
orary, English Garden II . 1976, 
aquatint, 

Henri VAN DE VELDE. Belgian, 1363-1937. 
Troppn . 1898, color lithograph, 

Bruce CONNER, American, 1933- 
Untitled, 1970, lithograph. 

After Edgar Degas, French, 20th c, 

Guy de Maupassant *s Le Maison Tellier , 
publ, by Vollard, 1934," T7 wood engravings 
after Degas by Georges Aubert and 19 
aquatints after Degas monotypes by Maurice 
Potin, 






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30 j'. .A -■'■■: '3 : : ^ 5.txr,r'-;: jj; -3 

0 rix:: 'O. 


Purchase Acquisitions; Prints (Continued ) 


DeWitt Hardy- 
North Bervd.ck, Maine 

DeV/itt HARDY, American, contemporary. 
Lovers, lithOf'^raph. 

Mi chi It ami 

Berkeley, Ca, 

Mi chi ITAMI, American, contemporary, 
Phoenix, 1976, color aquatirt. 

Leah Levy 

San Francisco 

Ten V/orks, Ten Painters, Serigraphs by 
George Ortman, Frank Stella, Ellsworth 
Kelly, Robert Mother\';ell, Andy Warhol, 
Stuar-t Da-vis, Roy Lichtenstein, Larry 
Poons, Robert Indiana. 

H.E, Lewis Inc. 

Anonymous, Augsburg c, 1500 

Virgin Crovmed by T\/o Angels, title page 
for Pelbartus de Temesvar's Stellarium 
corone,,,, 
white line v/oodcut. 

Auguste BOUQUET, French, l8lO-l846. 

Self Portrait as Transvestite. 

lithograph, 

BEIIJAICEN, French, I 81 I-? 

Caricature of Barye, the sculptor, I 838 . 
B,l; p, 55 - 36 , lithograph, 

Utagav/a SADAMASU, Japanese, active 
1834 - 1852 , 2 color woodcuts from Modem 
Mirror for Actors: 

Nakamura Tomi.iuro as Yujiri, early l840s 
Kataoka Gado as Izaemon, ” 

John Stanphill 

Fountain Valley, Ca* 

John STANPHILL, American contemporary. 
Untitled ^ 8 , mixed media. 

Thaclmrey and Robertson 
San Francisco 

David Lance GOINES. American, 19^5- 
Six progressive proofs for poster of 
Legion of Honor exhibit, photo offset 
lithographs. 

Sir Frank SHORT, English, 1857-1945. 

Mtc Rigi at Dawn. 1910, H, 94, 
mezzotint after J.M.V/, Turner, 


1976-1977 Fiscal YeciT Purchase Accessions; ^6 Prints 


- 46 - 





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ITEMS HANDLED BY THE 
ACHEIBACH FOUNDATION 


Loans FROM Tlie Achenloach Foundation for Graphic Arts 


Jiine 

April 

1 , 1976 to 

17 , 1977 : 

1 Drav/ing by Georgia O'Keeffe 

lent by American Federation of ;brts, 

Ne\/ York City, 

June 

Aug. 

15 , 1976 to 

31 , 1976 ; 

2 Color Prints by Kosliiro Onchi 

lent to the National Museuin of Modern Art, 
Tokyo, 

Sept, 

Nov, 

18, 1976 to 

7 , 1976: 

5 Norks, 3 Prints and 2 './atercolors, by 
contemporary Ai:ierican antists, Bontecou, 
Escobar, van Hoesen, Nilsson and Porter, 
lent to Sacred Heart School, Menlo Park, CA 

Oct, 

Jan, 

1, 1976 to 

11 , 1977 : 

1 Drawing by Maxfield Parrish, 

lent to Grunv;ald Center, U.C.L.A, , CA 

Oct. 

Feb, 

4 , 1976 to 

1 , 1977 : 

26 Italian Drawings of 17 th & l8th centuries, 
lent to Santa Barbara Museum of Art, CA 

Oct, 

Dec, 

8 , 1976 to 

1, 1976: 

30 Etchings by Giovanni Battista Piranesi, 
18th century Italian 
lent to Stanford University, CA 

Oct. 

Nov, 

10 , 1976 to 

18, 1976: 

8 Color prints by South and Central American 
contemporary artists, lent to the Mexican 
Museum, San Francisco, 

Oct, 

Jime 

12 , 1976 to 

30, 1977 : 

4 Color Etchings by John Ihle, lent to Art 
Gallery, University of North Dakota, 

Grand Forks, N, D, 

Oct. 

Nov, 

18, 1976 to 

28, 1976; 

30 Prints lent to Do\ 7 ntown Center, 65I Hov/ard, 
San Francisco, for Exhibition illustrating 
print mcJd.ng processes. 

Nov. 

Nov, 

24 , 1976 to 
.? 7 , 1977 : 

13 Photographs by Arnold Genthe, lent to San 
Francisco Museum of Modern Art for national 
circifLation, 

Jan, 

Mar. 

17 , 1977 to 

21 , 1977 : 

1 Water color by Douglas ’/ilson, American 
Contemporary, lent to V/orcester Art Museum, 


’/orcester, Mass, 


- 47 - 


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Loans FROM AFGA (Continued) 


February I6, 1977 to 

April 15, 1977: 

22 Drava.nr^s of 17thancl loth century Italy, 
lent to University of California, Santa 
Barbara, CA 

Jime 23, 1977 to 

September 4, 1977: 

69 Posters by David Lance Goines, 

American Contemporary, lent to University 
Art Gallery, U.C, , Berkeley, CA 

June 29, 1977 to 

March 12, 1978: 

3 Color Prints by American Artists, Ethel 
Need, Louis Phead, Frank Hazenplug, lent 
to V^itney Museum of American Art, Nev/ 
York City, 


1976 - 1977 Fiscal Year Loans from AFGA; 15 LOAI'iD OF 217 I'TI^LS to 15 
DESTINATIONS. 


- 48 - 


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ITEMS I!AI®LED BY THE 
ACIIENBACH FOUI®ATION 

Loans TO the Achenbach Fomidation 

May 22, 1976 to 


August 14, 1977: 



Loans for Sxliibitions : 

Gordon Baldwin Exliibition: 

GOHDOH BALDVilN, 25 Pen and Inlc Drra/inf;s. 
Bolinas, California 

America Observed Exhibition: 

G11SJ>HICS INTJTPdIATIOr.Wi, LTD. 

1 /asliing t on , D , C . 

24 Photorraplis by \/ALKER EVANS 


PHIE-DELPIIIA MUSEUM OF APT 

Pliiladelpliia, Pa, 

14 Etchings by EDV/APJ) HOPPED. 

Jafiies Torlalcson Exliibition; 

JAMES TODL/UtSON 

Pacifica, California 

27 Prints by JAIES TOPIAICSON. 

David Lance Goines Exhibition: 

DAVID LAI^ICE GOINES 

Berkeley, California 

6l Posters by DAVID LiEICE GOIICS. 

American Master Drav/infiis Exliibit: 

AMEPICAN FEDERATION OF ARTS 

Nev/ York City 

282 Drawings and 1/atercolors by 

American Artists, 

The Piute and The Brush Exhibit: 

V/ILLIAM BROVm: PAUL kONNER 

San Francisco 

50 Indian Miniature V/ater Color Paintings 

Currier & Ives Exhibition: 

THE ESMARIC COLLECTION OF CURPJER 8c IVES 
Cliicago, Illinois 

123 Color Lithographs Prints 

Sandria Hu - Monotypes Exliibit: 

SANDRIA HU 

Houston, Texas 

33 Color Monotypes. 


- 49 - 


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ACHENBACH FOUNDATION 


Loand to the Achenbach Foundation (Continued) 


September 1975 to 

August 5? 1976 : 

1 

Small, colored engraving, Christ in Limbo, 
by Albrecht Dltrer, Lent by Mr, Julius 
Landauer, San Francisco, 

March 

October 

8, 1976 to 

15 , 1976 : 

k 

Prints by Eugene-Samuel Grasset, Swiss 
artist, lent by Jean V/einba.ura, San Francisco 

October 

June 

15 , 1976 to 

13, 1977: 

4 

Lithograph prints by Shiko Munakata, 
lent by Robert Sawers, London, England, 

March 

April 

25 , 1977 to 

29 , 1977: 

3 

V/ater colors by Winslov/ Homer, 

lent by George D, Hart, San Francisco. 

March 

2^, 1977 to 

49 

Drav/ings, 

June 

28 , 1977: 

3 

1 

V/ood Engravings, 

V/atercolor, by William Harnett, 

lent by Alfred Frankenstein, San Francisco. 


1976 ~ 1977 FISCAL YEAR TOTAL LOANS TO AFGA: 13 Sources lent 704 Items, 


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ACHSNBACH FOUNDATION 

Gift Acquisitions; Drai^in.^s 


Anonymous Donor 

Douglas Fenn i/ILSON. American, 1953- 
Upstream Passage, 1973 • water color 

Mr, and Mrs. Joseph M, 
Bransten, San Francisco 

Lyonel FEININGEP. American, 1871-1956, 

PeacefilL. 19^2. graphite, inlc, charcoal, 
and v/ater color. 

Sir Max BEEPJBOHl^I. English, 1872-1956. 

Two sketches for A Survey (publ. 1921): 
for pi. 21; Trick Election of 19l8. graphite, 
for pi, 3^s Gi Vieillesse Pouvait. inlc & graphite 

Hope Lobner Caliill 

Palo Alto, Ca, 

Hope LOBNER (Cahill). American, 1894- 
Floral Relief, 1912. charcoal draxving. 

Tulips. 1913 • ” 

Savonarola, 1914, " 

Beulali Path, 1915 • ” 

Mrs. Sten E, Carlson 
Millbrae, Ca. 

(Frank E, Carlson Memorial 
Collection) 

David Lance GOiriES, .biierican, 1945- 
Layout drawing for poster of Legion of Honor 
Sxliibit. 1976 , pen and inlc. 


Mrs. Alexander De Bretteville David COX, English, 1783-1359. 


San Francisco 
(partial gift) 

Grey Day, Calais Pier, v;ater color. 

Mr, and Mrs, George Hopper 
Fitch, San Francisco 

John Taylor ATliS, American, 1887-1953* 

Matching the People Beloit, Amiens, 1921. 
pen and black inlc drawing, 

John Singer SARGENT, American, 1856-1925 . 

A Note (The Libreria, Venice), watercolor. 

Estate of Mrs, Nell 

Chidester Garside 
(1973 Bequest) 

Otis OLDFIELD, American, 189 O-? 

Dancing Figures, oil on paper, 

Frank J. VAN SLOUN, American, 1879-1938, 

Sketch of Tliree Fi.gures, watercolor, 

Marie LAURENCIN, French, 1835-1956. 

Head of a Young Girl, pencil drawing. 

The Goldyne Family 
(Dr, and Mrs, Josexoh R, 
Goldyne) San Francisco 

Nathaniel DAI'JCE, English, 1723-l8ll. 

Portrait of a Lady, pencil drawing. 

Portrait of a Gentleman, pencil drawing. 

Sir Thomas LABTIENCE, English, 1769-1830. 

Portrait of Mrs, Sarah Siddons, pencil drawing. 


- 51 - 




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ACIIENBACII FOUNDATION 


I 


> 


Gift Acquisitions: Drawin,n:s (continued ) 


Mr, and Mrs, Herinan Phleger V/, Russell FLINT. Scottish, l380-l ; 69 

San Francisco Sand and Sea , water color, 

I4r, and Mrs, Richard Lockwood Tower Ker-I(avier ROUSSEL. French, 1867-191^ 
San Francisco Au Jar din , pastel. 


1975~1977 Fiscal Year; Gift Accessions; 20 Drawin,n:s (inc, partial ??Lft) 

from 10 Donors 


- 52 - 


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I 


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1 


^ > 

ACICNBACH FOUITOATION 
Purchase AcqxrLsitions; Dra.vmir:s 


Gordon Baldvd.n 

Gordon BALDtllN. Atierican, 1939- 
Bach 's Eighth Fugue. 1976. inlc dravang 

Heim Gallery, Ltd. 

London 

Anonymous French, c. 1790 

Portrait of a Man. pencil, v/asli Sc gouache 

J.S. Maas Sc Co., Ltd. 

London 

Pd. chard DADD, English, l8l9-l589. 

Bearded Man v.d.th Pipe, v/ater color. 

Anthony Peed 

London 

David COX, English, 1783-1339 • 

Grey Day, Calais Pier, watercolor. 


(partial gift of lirs. Alexander de Bretteville) 


Franlc S, Schwarz & Son 

Philadelphia, Pa, 

(Director’s contingency fund) 

B.F, OSGOOD. American, 19th c. 

Swan and Feather, steel pen and inlc. 

Shepherd Gallery, Associates, Inc, 
Ne\7 York 

Eugene DELACROIX. French, 1798-1863 . 

Sheet of Studies, graphite draving. 

Thomas Mathev; ROOKS. English, 1842-19^2, 
T\';o Standing Male Fi.gures, graphite. 

Yvonne Tan Bunzl 

London 

Giovanni Francesco Banbieri, IL GUERCINO. 
Italian, 1591-1666. 

St, John the Evangelist Meditating His 

Gospel, brown inlc drawing. 

Thaclorey and Robertson 

San Francisco 

(i-ildred Anna ' illiams Fund) 

Edmond-Fran9ois Al-iAN-JEAH, French, 

1860-1933. 

Les Confidences, c, I898, pastel. 

Susan V, './elling 

Palo -EL to, Ca, 

Giovanni Battista TIEPOLO, Italian, 

1696-1770, 

A Monk, ink and v/ash draving. 


1976-1977 PLscal Year; Purchase Accessions; 10 Dra^ri-ngs 

(incl, pcirtial purchase) 


- 33 - 


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) 


ACIENBACH FOUNDATION 
Gift Acquisitions ; Prints 


Mr, and I4rs, E.C, Bassett 

Mill Valley, Ca. 

Beth VAN HOESEN. American, 1926- 
Poppies and Peony, suite of 4 aquatints. 

Bo.y Area Graphic /irts Council 

Elisabeth QUANDT, yhnerican, 1922- 
Homage to Boudin. IO 76 . portfolio of 

4 etchings. 

Joseph M. Brojisten 

San Francisco 

Georges POUAULT, French, l871-195o. 

Self Portrait, 17,85. color lithograph. 

Mrs, Annette Carlson 

San Francisco 

David Lance GOINES, i\merican, 1945- 
62 posters, photo offset lithographs. 


(Franlc M, Carlson Memorial Collection) 


Bernard Childs 

New York and Paris 

Bernard CHILDS, American, 1910- 
No^, 1976 , color etching. 

Color Guard Employees 

Braniff International 

Dallas , Texas 

Alexander CALDEK, American, 1898-1976, 

Flying Colors. 1976. color lithograph. 

Mrs, Doris Coyle 

San Francisco 

Gordon COOK, Ajnerican, 1927- 
Geraniums, etching. 

lir. and Mrs. George Hopper Fitch 

Josef ALBERS, i\merican, b, Germany I 888 - 
Untitled, 1962, etching, 

V7ill BAPxNET. American, 1911- 
Strange Bird, 1947. lithograph. 

Frank W. BENSON. Miericon, 1862-1951. 

A Cup of VJater. P, I 96 , etching, 

Isabel BISHOP, American, 1902- 

Girls Sitting in Union Square Fountain, 1936 

J,l4, etching, 

Felix BFcACquSMOND. French, l833-19l4, 

Margot la critique. B,113/iii, proof before 
letter, etching. 

F,-A. CAZALS. French, l865-194l. 

Verlaine de dos. 1893. lithograph \cLth 
hand color. 

Jose Luis CUEVAS, Mexican, 1934- 
Bordello scene, ded, to Ramon }Ciran,1969. 
lithograph. 


- 54 - 








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% 


Gift Acgioisitions Prints (Continued ) 


Mr, and Mrs, George Hopper Fitch Stuart DAVIS, American, 189^-1964. 

Untitled, serigraph. 

Francisco BOSAMANTES, Mexican, 1911’* 
Mayan Trio , lithograph. 

Andre DUNOYER DE SEGONZAC, French, 
1884-1974, 

Un puits ancien for p, 77 of Les 
Georgiques , L,&C, 1943* etching, 

Henri FANUN-LATOUR, French, l836-1904. 
Sheet of studies of nudes. 

H,l82/i, trial proof w, number and first 
sketches, lithograph, 

Lucio FONTANA. Italian, 1899-1968. 
Concetto Spaziale , 1968, mixed media, 

Norbert GOENEUTTE. French, l854-l894. 

Le Pont-Neuf , etching, 

Marcel GROMAIRE, French, 1892- 
Lion of Belfort , etching. 

Robert GWA'THMEY, American, 1903- 
V/oman Sowing Grain , serigraph. 

Seated Woman , serigraph, 

George Overbury "Pop" HART, American, 
1868-1933 o 

Springtime in New Orleans , 1923 • 

C. 69 * li thograph • 

Eugene ISABEY. French, l803-l886, 

Ruines du chateau de Bouzols , • . from 
Voyages pittoresques, Auvergne . C,4o/ii. 
lithograph. 

Maree Basse . 1833 • from Six Marines . 
C,65/ii. lithograph. 

Yasuo KUNIYOSHI. American, 1893-1933. 

Girl Milking Cow , 1927. lithograph. 

Alphonse LEGROS, French, 1837-1911. 

Extase poetique . etching. 

Jack LEVINE, American, 1913- 
King David , etching. 


- 33 - 


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■_ '■ ■ jjJjX; • 


> 


Gift Acquisitions Prints (Continued ) 


Mr, and Mrs, George Hopper Fitch Stanton MACDONALD- VffilGHT, American, 

1890-1975. 

Untitled. 1962, etching, 

Aristide MAILLOL, French, l86l-19^1. 

Femme e t endue . . ,1926, 0,323. etching, 

Charles MERYON. French, I 82 I-I 868 , 
L’Esperance, D,35/il. etching, 

Kenneth Hayes MILLER, American, 

1876-1952. 

Crouching Nude , etching, 

Jose Clemente OROZCO, Mexican, 

1883-19^9. 

Three Generations . 1926, lithograph, 

Jose Guadalupe POSADA, Mexican, 

18!X-1913. 

Mo tines El Volador , from Discurso 
Politico, p,50. zinc engraving, 

Odilon REDON. French, l840-19l6. 

XIII., et qtie des yeux: sans tete , , , from 
Flaubert’s Tentations de Sainte-Antoine . . 
M,l46, lithograph, 

IX, ,et le lis pour mille ans from 
Apocalypse de Saint-Jean . M. l82, 
lithograph, 

Augustin Theodule RIBOT, French, 

1823-1891. 

L’aide de cuisine from Scenes culinaires 
#5, B, 8 /ii, etching, 

Diego RIVERA, Mexican, 1886-1957. 

Market Scene , 1930. linoleum block. 

Sleep , 1932 , lithograph, 

Zapata . 1932, lithograph, 

David Alfaro SIQUEIROS, Mexican, 
1896 - 197 ^. Seated Nude , lithograph. 

Mank TOBEY, American, 1890-1976. 
Composition , 1967. color lithograph, 

Maurice UTRILLO. French, 1883-1955. 

La Maison Rose a Montmartre , lithograph. 


- 56 - 




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TAG "• gOoX xAJXTaO’U vD-TubM 

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> > 

Gift Acquisitions Prints (Continued ) 


Mr,, and Mrs, George Hopper Fitch 

Jacques VTLLON. French, 1875-1963 • 

La Faute, 1904, A,8«P,64, aquatint, 

Julian Alden IffllR, American, 1852-1919 • 
Mother and Child #2,2,7/ii*etching. 

Estate of lirs, Nell Chidester Garside 
(1973 Bequest) 

Keisei EISEN, Japanese, active l8lO-l847. 
Courtesan Drying Face, color woodcut, 

Maurice UTRILLO, French, 1883-1955. 

Moulin de la Galette, lithograph, 

Mauricio LASANSKY, American, 1914- 
La Lagiama, 1944, mixed intaglio, 

Lyonel FEININGER, American, 1871-1956. 
Church with Tall Tower. 1920«Po221 woodcut 
Regentag am Strande, P,29. woodcut, 

Marie LAURENCIN, French, 1885-1956. 

Girl with Bouquet, color lithograph, 

John KELLY, American, 1877-7 

Standing Woman, Holoku, Hawaii, 

color etching. 

The Goldyne Family 

(Dr. and Mrs, Joseph B, Goldyne) 

San Francisco 

Jacques VILLON, French, 1895-1963. 

Autre Temps: 1830 . 1904. A. & P. 72. 
drypoint and color aquatint. 

Brian Halsey 

Ann Arbor, Michigan 

Brian HALSEY, American contemporary, 
Costmos Suite, 1976, suite of 5 serigraphs 

Robert Flynn Johnson 

San Francisco 

Emil GANSO. American, l895-194l. 

Jules Pascin. woodcut. 

John Lov/ell Jones 

Stinson Beach, Ca, 

Jose LAMBERT, American, 1939- 
Arches France #L. color lithograph 
with string. 

Dr, Maury Leibovitz 

Malibu, Ca, 

Robert MOTHERVfflLL, American, 1915- 
Hermitage, color lithograph. 

Mr, and Mrs, F,A, Lejeune 

Frank Morley FLETCHER. American, 

1866 - 1949 . 

California 2-Mt, Shasta, color woodcut. 

Martin Levine 

Oakland, Ca. 

Martin LEVIT'IE, American, 1945- 

The Pardee House-south view, aquatint 

The Pardee House-west view, aquatint 


- 57 - 




i 




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Gift Acquisitions Prints (Continued ) 


Leah Levy 
San Francisco 

Albert A, List Family Collection 
(Mrs, Albert A, List) 


Mr, and Mrs, Nikita D, Lobanov 
San Francisco 


Judith Lopez 
San Francisco' 

Mr, and Mrs, Herman Phleger 


William Stanton Picher 
San Francisco 

Ernest Posey 
San Francisco 


Marie BRUMOND, American, 1948- 
Pacific Flavors , 1976, serigraph, 

V/arrington COLESCOTT, American, 1921- 
History of Printmalcing; S,V/, Hayter 

Discovers Viscosity Printing . 197^» 

color etching, 

Don MATIS, American, contemporary, 

N, Truhanova as La Peid , after Bakst, 
poster, 

Judith LOPEE, American, 1940- 

Black Profiles, Series 6 , 1976, aquatint 

REMBRANDT VAN RIJN, Dutch, I608-I669. 
Christ Preaching , H,236, etching, 

PABLO PICASSO, Spanish, 1881-1973. 

Lysis trata Suite , 1934, six etchings. 

Sir Francis Seymour HADEN, English, 

1818-1910, 

Old Chelsea Church , H.llO, etching, 

Joseph PENNELL, American, I86O-I926, 

Mist Over the Thames , V/,237. aquatint. 

Axel Herman HAIG, Swedish, 1833-1921, 
Mont St, Mchel , 1882, A, 27, etching, 
Burgos Cathedral; Interior , l889.A,63> 
Toledo Cathedral; Interior , I889 , A, 66 , 
Portals, Reims Cathedral , I892, A, 94, 
Durham Cathedral , 1q'93» -4. 99 . 

St, iiark^s Venice: Interior , I897. A, 123 
Assisi, October Evening , 1903. A, 130, 

Cxu'rier and Ives, American, 19th c, 

Vfliy DonH He Come? , hand colored litho. 

Ernest POSEY, Amierican, 1937- 
Bubble Chamber , 1976, serigraph. 


Fred Reisinger 
Zm Francisco 


Fred PUISINGER, American, 1930- 
Ahoy, 1973. serigraph v;ith embossing, 








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> 


Gift Acquisitions Prints (Continued) 


Mr. and Mrs. Allan P. Sindler 
San Francisco 


Smith-Andersen Gallery 
Palo Alto, Ca, 


Estate of Marvin Spohn 


Anthony HARPISON. English, 1931- 
Requiem I . etching. 

Requiem II . etching. 

Requiem III , etching. 

Leonard BASKIN, Ajuerican, 1922- 
Blake . 1963* etching. 

Ares , from Iliad folio, etching, 
Hephaistos , from Iliad folio, etching, 
Castle Street Dogs . l4 wood engravings, 

John COLEMAN, Araeid.can, 1923- color 
Some Figures and a Table . 1964, etching 

Joseph ZIRKER, American, 1924- 
Un titled raonoprint, 

Kenjilo NANAO. American, 1929- 
Silver Flower III , color lithograph, 

Marvin SPOHN, American, 1934-1976. 

153 etchings and drypoints. 


Van Doren Gallery 
San Francisco 


Fred REISINGER, American, 1930- 
Poster for California Society of 

Fnintmakers . 1976. ~~ 

color lithograph id-th embossing. 


1976-1977 Fiscal Year Gift Accessions: 343 Prints from 29 Donors 


- 59 - 


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ACHEKBACH FOUT'IDATION 


Gifts to the Library and Miscellaneous 


I4r, and Mrs, Joseph M, Bransten 
San Francisco 

Rena and Patricia Bransten 
San Francisco 

In honor of Alexandra Phillips 

George H, Cabaniss, Jr. 

San Francisco 

Susan King 
San Francisco 

Julius Landauer 
San Francisco 

Betty LaDuke 
Ashland, Oregon 

Mr. and Mrs, Arnold D, Palley 
San Francisco 


V/illiam Stanton Picher 
San Francisco 


Mr, and Mrs, Richard Lockwood Tower 
San Francisco 


George D, Hart 
Ross, California 

George D, Poole, Jr, 
San Francisco 


Beerbohm, Max: A Survey . New York, 1921. 


De La Faille, J.B, ; Vincent Van Gogh 
revised 1970, 


4 books for Theater and Dance Library 

2 DHrer facsimiles 

3 drawing catalogues 


3 Kornfeld and Klipstein catalogues 


LaDiike, Betty: China, A Sketchbook Tour 


Eichenberg, Fritz: The Art of the Print . 
New York 1976. 

Hendricks, Gordon: Life an.d Work of 
Thomas Eakins . New York, 197^, 

T^ze von Anna Pavlova im Bilde , 

Dresden, 1931. 

Leder, Carol;^’ii: Stanley Spencer: The 
Astor Collection . London, 197^« 

Sarre, Friedrich & Eugen Mittv/och: 
Zeichnungen von Riza Abbasi . 

Munich, 1914. ' ' ' ' 

Oval mat cutter 


Stock, Received May 1976 but not ack- 
nowledged by Delores Malone until 
July 1976, 


I 


i 




1 . 1 'Ooric^E 't: Ji 


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'• . • ; v.i r:j;« r_ 




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e" r-T' i:;o’ -..o^ 

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. .. Cv/".. e,uJ'’A.-rv:' 

; .Iro:. ■■' j’.';;'' ^!jy:'-^.--. : 1 Ai’ 




y- r .■■•;r G'vl -^sfl Ai ' OeG 
.5 roam ra-Irh */■•' i; .■rro.Iv/fvr'- 


rasroxim'i xrrB 

xx'^C' ■ 3 .''ifi'>''G .(.>.ca fc'TB )r.'?' 3 >i 
00 ■’ rr?- 
r-;[,.arixcl'I '-rj.. ic t:n .i Ji 

ri'b fL-,o-aioCl.?.0 .H eyriosD 
o.;r'' Ji"B 

0 X 01 -’; ryyssjB 
oo^.iayz'f^ ixo>£ 

' ‘yiTS. ;:'C rl OX ocIifT- 
o-'O.: -xriG'i'; iisS 

6.iov: :o.T 

xxc-,.:ri.O' .. b;'"-' ^0 “' 

0;; “Xa'T s(i .■'.Lona.fv oS'X’ii br.; .XT' 
coalcaAO.- .'oB 


asor-'X'-I jfoXno:r3 raftxir.r-J 
c'OrXo 'O ob xxrb 


■■'->'■’ 03 ' &oov :'0 3 l I’'xx;rir.Gx ,? 2 o:r} ooxr boM 
ooi\x::o..^. ’ xrxsci 


j tsil *C e^o • ..: 
BXCi'XCi'v .i: j'-C.O f KCC'' ' 

.'Xl- ^-'.toor .G 03 -TC'.G} 
oor'.; K -:3 


f 


APPENDIX j.„ 


GIFT ADDITIONS TO THE COLLECTIONS OF TFIE M. H. DE YOUNG MET^QRIAL MUSEUM 


76 . 15.1 

76.15.2 


76.16.1-8 


76.17.1-6 

76.17.7 


76.18.1 

76 . 18 . 2 (A,B) 


76.19 


76.20.1 

76.20.2 

76.20.3 

76.20.4 


76.21.1 

76.21.2 

76.21.3 

76.21.4 


76.22 


76.23.1 

76.23.2 


76 . 24.1 

76 . 24.2 


76 . 25.1 

76.25.2 


76.26.1-20 

76.27 

76.28 

76.29 


COPTIC TAPESTRY FRAGMENT , 4 th- 5 thc. 

ET^BROIDEPxED TURKISH TOITEL , late l 8 thc. 

Gift of Ho\ 7 rj 7 d El ting, Jr. ^2) 

COLLECTION OF SILVER’ LARE (Accepted as Gift to Museums Foundation 
Gift of Miss Elizabeth H. Blakey 

SIX COPTIC TEXTILE FRAGMENTS . 3 rd- 5 thc. 

FLOPvAL DAMASK FRAGMENT . French, ca, 1770 
Gift of Mrs, Vivienne L. Blanquie 

PROFILE OF MOHAMI-IAD II . medal by Bertoldo di Giovanni, ca. l 48 o 
PAIR OF IVORY PLAQUES , German, ca 1520 
Gift of Julius Landauer 

MIDDLE SEPIK V/OVEN BASKET MASK (Gift to Museum Foundation L 76 , 35 ) 
Gift of Mr, & Mrs, Vifilliam King Self, Jr, 

KOR MASK 

GABLE MASK 

BOARDS TUSK NECIOACE 

TURTLE SHELL MASK I'/IIH FEATHERS 

Gift of Victor J. Bergeron (Gift to Museum Foundation L 76 , 36 ) 

BOZO POT 

DOGON IRON STAFF 
ZAIRE VJOOD STAFF 

FON STAFF HEAD 

Exchanged (Board of Trustee Approval - August 10 , 1976 ) for: 

2247 MAORI FEATHER CLOAK 

47.23.3 HAV/AIIAN V/OOD BOl^L (UI 4 EKE ) 

59 . 12.4 imONESIAN ANCESTOR FIGURE (KOROWAR ) 

COSTU~MB . French, 19 th- 20 thc. 

Gift of Comtesse Emnanuel de Casteja 

UNGUENTARIUM . Roman glass, lst- 2 ndc. 

UNGUENTARIUli . Roman glass, lst- 2 ndc. 

Gift of Charles K, Gamble 

ZOOMORPHIC HELMET MASK , Chamba, Nigeria, wood 
FETISH FIGURE . Senufo, Ivory Coast, wood, cloth & feathers 
Gift of 14 r. & Mrs. Erie Loran 

HUI 4 AN HAIR SPRAY ARRANGEMEI^T , American, ca I865 
HUMAiNf HAIR SPRAY ARRAI^GEIiENT , American, ca I865 
Bequest of Anna K, Burnett 

COLLECTION OF 20 HUICHOL If^IAN YARN PAIITTINGS 

Gift of Peter F. Young 

CANCELLED (NOT USED) 

^’POBBO" FUNEPvARY FIGURE . Kissi, Guinea, stone 
Salinger Fund Purchase 

LES BAIG^?EUSES , oil painting by Joseph Vernet 
Gift of Mrs, Georgia M, V/orthington 

SILVER-GILT CHALICE , German, ca 1450 
Gift of Julius Landauer 

- 61 - 


77.1 




% 4 .. 


/ - (r- 




: ,T’":;;'.w''. Y^.;VT.N?.a' oiT'-.o"' 

., , , . , r.;rr 

■::j:', r.-. 40 . 1 ’.;,, '.S 21 '., 

• ;£J. J 3 ' ■ ' '< SO 


.. oX vc.’-i;.',; '.'v.. xjr. .rvr oiTqoo xx 

; '-M -.ii.;;:--.-™,’' 

.. .,>1 


■; r 


roiX' c>^OT'i:oaxx'’.j xi x »:/!' s;[' ;QiT Tarj;: t'xid 

3->I,cI.oV 
d-X,VI.?S' 

(a:.A)s,8i.dS' 

<?.% j? 

X.OS.d^ 
S.O:^*c)V 

X.CS,3\ 


I.IS.JV 

S.IS.oN' 

^ xrs.ov 


;c. , •.•< of,;' - - • .4 <>'...' 40 ,.;^ 

■.' XX' '0 { rirvi;'': '. 0 

'jOyrj,.,.; .1 ^:jxX;jX 10 

■■ . :;■/ jXio) XoAX ■/XXXfX’ }irXX.-x ^uii-vivoo i 

xi.v;-':. xo nic 



'Xato xr-?;r.2:.:'t xa<.x-a'' . x-i’xx 

; 

.ojrTjCX-.oT?I eXar^o-X' 
ob .Xc‘.f:tr;:..',:X Aia.uO lo •'■^•r2 

, c:baX-' X-X' sssa-^cf I'y 

.ob.xX-j-l^T LiRiV Cl 

e.'XiffixD JI nsX 



fv Abe-..-; Xa>so'> v^'ovl 

■r^icJ eJlTa ,.2rX! - ,2'X; 'to, ' 


c!XX ■■ r-i «!iooJ:xO!..i4. , 
pXX_r 



r-^jJoY. a '-' o-'cP: X "o.- :X-^X.X 


OtJB.XO'IfXi brC-OX. '!.• 


rX'-xr 


. ■:tst.f.o.-''rie..' 

ix - 


xs,c;x 


x.:x,ov 

SXcS.oV 

's*"is«ax 

I.ps«av 

S»XSc^V 


;.CS:'.Xr TXX) L, XXiXO IX'' 


r,.o;o-T. ';o Ei!xJnxsfl Ixo ,£3ha21£M£. '£X 

.'loj'i^; o' '.'O'. vj ,;■'! :.ily.:oci.> ./..o.i ‘i'l: X:'' :?) 


.. ■'.tst.f.O'-''rie..' a.ci;.Lo -• io X ilex- 


es.. X 

I.nV 


GIFT ADDITIONS DE YOUNG MUSEUI4 (Continued) 


77.2 

77.3 

77.^.1-3 

77.3 

77.6 

77.7 

77.8 

77.9 


PHILADELPHIA HIGHBOY , mahogany w/brass fittings 
Gift of Mr, & Mrs, Robert A, Magowan 

SET OF FOUR TEA POYS (TABLES) , English 

Gift of the Magowan Decorative Arts Fund 

THREE HAWAIIAN FEATHER LETS , ca early l800*s 

Gift of Mrs, Lloyd Osborne in memory of Mrs. John M, Dowsett 

IMTITLED TAPESTRY (WOVEN ON ALBERT HERTER LOOM), 1913 
Gji,ft of The Fine Arts Museums Trustees Fund 

5AWAGES DE LA MER PACIFIQUE , l8o6, handpainted wallpaper 

Gift of Georgia M, V/orthington & The Fine Arts Museums Trustees 

UPSET , oil painting by Joseph Decker 
Gift of Alfred Frankenstein 

NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN BASKET 

Gift of Mrs, Theodore Friedlander 

ACOMA POT (Geometric, Floral and Parrot Motifs) 

Gift of Mrs, Patricia Foubert 


77.10 CHANCAY TEXTILE FRAGMENT , brown and cream 

Gift of Mr, and Mrs, Douglas E, Hill 

77.11.1-5 FIVE 20th CEIMTURY LADIES’ COSTUICSS 
Gift of Albert Schwabacher, Jr, 


77.12.1 VJEDDING DRESS , ca I 835 

77.12.2 STRIPED BROVJN SILK DRESS , ca l875 

Gift of Marshall Hughes 

77.13 BAMBARA KONO SOCIETY MASK 

Gift of Mr, 8c Mrs, Marc Franklin (to be listed as Anonymous Donors) 

77.1^ JACOBIS LADDER , tapestry fragment 

Gift of Elizabeth Ebert and the Arthur ¥, Barney Fund 


77.15 NE1<'IBURYP0RT ROOM , ca early iSOO's, period room (American) 

Gift of The Museum Society Auxiliary 

77.i6(a,b) pair of majolica basiqdts v/ith fruits and vegetables 

Bequest of Mrs, James Bodrero 


bnt 




( 


. i"':' 




. -•: '-.I 


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:.-■■* ei^rx!.. .• .o'.':!- lo 

T' :::a:X^. H'v If: 

I ^Ktyvairl'I t;:'-"!/ oa - 1 


•xi"r:!:uT' 


. .00, f,-:.. .v-co,: .dc 3 ,r .aBffCiXo.SXX-X .;’s£p& 

ow ■:.' 'T.-.X o' .;■ X* 

•i.>:Xor: .ofor.oL ^ 

i..X!:h'..--6>rri-; XI b^Xi.U b j •'•i.bV: 


.'i^ruslbo 

{^'ij.:'--.\ JX'icJX XX- X:'!-'oi=sO} XIVi 

d"xX;o’': £ilr>j"r:'rs=^_ , i/:A io 'b. 


A/IOO/'. 


~- 

:;;:V':o ov/oiX X ' 

I^i-F x: -i-XxJoC i ;•■? jiAO 


■;,% b:-':;c.;.X i'i ''w) ..' j:J'-:-.x:'^ 


e5X7;boo 

;-x}X^xl!Sal-T6d.rA dl.rS 

.;-'Fya OAivdx: 

.I'oXOT-. 

/dCb C'-l'7F 


;vd" '^o ,;."'bxa 


\;s 


^r-o.:r’'_wX:'; -■XrXo...,^: c. 

’^lkTi^'xA Xi'i 3- -■- -A ■f3'scX:X..i -■:• i'-> v~x 


;.) fuoo:: ;:0X'.-!':v ,a'Oc':.L X'X-'^ 

.li .b-i.X "bsioo-- c-i:’.l- ''io ^''Ij.';.- 


. X.A.'^V 


'Fe\’'\ 

r'" 

CI,?V 

r,L,7S‘ 

I-XIAX' 

CXlVs 

ALx?- 

XI.:’- 


'.r- X:X::xbT C/IA b.-'Frr, -yrr' rxxXAET (8.^fi.;o .,\\ 






LOANS TO THE M. H. DE YOUNG HEMOBIAL MUSEUM 


L76,7 the BARGEI^IAI^ * S VrjFE , oil pciinting by Robert Spencer 

Loaned by Mr, & Mrs, Harry W, Anderson 

L76.8 EGYPTIAI^ (OLD laNGDOM) LIMESTONE RELIEF 

Loaned by Galerie de Sycomore, Paris, France 

*L76,9 mahogany desk (MASSACHUSETTS ), ca. 1765 

Loaned by Harrison Antiques, San Juan Capistrano, California 

L76.10(A,B) PAIR OF SILVER STATUETTES , Italian 
Loaned by Robert Fairall 


L76,11 the sailor *S RETURN , oil painting by Toby Rosenthal 
Loaned by the Florence Heilman Elirman Trust 

L76.12 TROPICAL SCENE AT NIGHT , oil painting by Frederic E, Church 
Loaned by Earl Osborn 

L76.13 COLLECTION OF PRE-COLUMBIAN FRESCOES 

Loaned by Crocker National Bank (Estate of Harold Wagner) 

♦L76. 14.1-3 THREE MASAI BEi\D NECKLACES 

Loaned by Thomas K, Seligman 

♦L76.15.l-3 THREE MASAI ETHNIC ARTIFACTS 
Loaned by Jean Colvin 

♦L76.l6.l-23 PHOTOGPxAPHS AND OBJECTS FOR MASAI EXHIBITION 



Loaned by A1 van Dalen 

L76.17.1 

GEORGIAN COFFEE POT, silver by Thomas Mason, London, 1726/27 

L76.17.2 

GEORGIAN CREAMER, silver, English, ca 1790 

L76.i7.3-6 

FOUR EMBROIDERED HANDKERCHIEFS, ca, 1920-30 

L76.17.7-10 FOUR ANTiqUE LACE DOILIES 

Loaned by Mr, & Mrs, George Hopper Fitch 

L76.I8.I 

NOMOLI FIGURES 

L76.18.2 

FACE MSK 

L76,18.3 

F5TISH FIGURE 

L76.18.4 

FACE MASK 

Loaned by Bill Withers 

L76.19 

HORNED CAP liASK 

Loaned by Michael Sarrazin 

L76,20,1 

CLAY PIPE 

L76,20.2 

DIVINATION BOVJL 

Loaned by Robert and Lilyan Eisenstein 

L76.21.1 

STANDING FIGURE 

L76.21.2 

STAITOII^ FIGURE 

L76,21,3 

FACE MASK 

L76.21o4 

JANUS SHiJIGO STAFF 

L76,21.5 

PASSPORT MASK 

L76,21.6 

s'TAI'IDING male figure 

L76,21,7 

JANUS HEADDRESS 

L76,21.8 

DOG FORM OBJECT 

Loaned by Edgar and Marcellina Gross 


- 63 - 


c;svj: 


i 


{ 






: .Aj ■* X’' ’^.ovi 

• :'-.v .v/ . vV\ ■'i X’j L^':-.j~ 

"■ * ' - ■ ' ■ PP9.iiPf’P„ ^ " 

"j .. a o. 'T--. .•vc.>3.r-.-. ;->. X’ ,>:' Xait'^Oi.T 

^”'*1 ‘ --pli . /le.OOI.c'M 




•:nr-: j;-; :;•„. . , 8 ni 0 .n 
-■lull".' \c'' L3r;!?oJI 


.vH 


■; ■:,ai<r..:.4 ,M;a,Ii.l53S,M22'i£I 

;'i''i;0‘, :■■■■.' '■•-■■ii- V.;' i.c- -■■:>:.• J- 

■j? r'-i.’ SJ2. MSiitysi 

',' ’ .C ,;io.rr,?'; "-,-ioo*: Y'' 



... ._.™. 





LOANS TO M. H. DE YOUNG MEi)40RIAL MUSEUM (Continued) 




*L76.23 


*L76.24-.;. 

(A,B,C,D) 

♦L76.23 


L76a26.1 

L76.26.2 

L76.26.3 

L76.26,4 


L76.27.1 

L76.27,2 


L76.28 


L76.29.1 

L76.29,2 

L76,29.3 

L76.29.4 


L76.30.1 

L76.30.2 

(A,B) 


*L76.31o1 

L76.31,2 

L76.31.3 


L76.32.1 

L76.32.2 

L76.32.3(A,B) 

L76.32.4 

L76.32,3 

L76.32.6 

L76.32.7 

L76.32.8 


STANDING FEMALB SHRINE FIGURE 

Loaned by Joe Wizan 

»'POMDO»» FUNERARY FIGURE , Kissi-Guinea 

Loaned by Alexander Suggs Gallery, St, Louis, Missouri 

NEST OF FOUR TEA POYS (TABLES) , English, l8thc. 

Loaned by I4r, Stephen Crawfurd 

SILVER GANN , English, ca. 1720 

Loaned by Golden Gate Collectors 

EETISH MASK 

FACE MASK 
STAITDING FIGURE 
FETISH !iASK 

Loaned by The Fine Arts Museums Foundation 
Gift of Sydney and Claire Pollack 

FACE MASK , Liberia, Dan 

LOOM HEDDLE PULLEY (SIJPxMOUNTED BY BIRD ), Ivory Coast, Senufo 
Loaned by The Fine Arts Museums Foundation 
Gift of Bill Withers 

FACE MASK 

Loaned by The Fine Arts Museums Foundation 
Gift of Michael Sarrazin 

ABSTRACT MASK W/TRUMPET 

HELMET MASK 
STANDING FETISH FIGURE 

FACE MASK 

Loaned by The Fine Arts Museums Foundation 
Gift of Robert and Lilyan Eisenstein 

HORNED CAP MASK 

MALE AND FEI'^IALE FIGURES 

Loaned by The Fine Arts Museums Foundation 
Gift of Edgar and Marcellina Gross 

ASHANTI COMPOSITE NECIGLACE 

MUDFISH RING 
PORCUPINE RING 

Loaned by James V/illis Gallery 

TANKAPJD , English, silver, l8thc, 

LADLE ^ English, silver, 19thc, 

PAIR OF SERVING SPOONS , English, l8th c. 

CAUDLE CUP , French, silver, l8thc, 

GOBLET , English, 19thc. 

CREAMER , English, l8thc, 

BOVJL , Portugese, l8thc. 

TODDY LADLE , English, silver, l8thc. 

Loaned by The Fine Arts Museums Foundation 
Gift of Miss Elizabeth H, Blalcey 




'■‘‘;fOT^. '''.Vi, "Ilia 

:tc:.l\J ■:.o U \,J Leji'.'.Oul 

'•■ fV'..'-’"' ■:!:oh::sy.:of'i ix-'iCnVi. 

•' vVv-uilO ao.i.qc:fc. '^d b''d.oJ. 

•i-'-o-’-or.rdia .fi'^dloD -vid Jion.s<:u.'. 



■:■■ t^-^bns.‘C~ Bniuertfi'l aj-'SA err.ir'i esU: yrJ 

il0£.IXaS. ■-'i/:jz.J'Z bn.B v.zciL'iB. -j'iia 

rijS'I ..B.cirooxJ 

■rovi . 

•-.iid/sb’-cjj'o'i: i.Ld ad-f.' on^ ni!']’ Y, 

■ :3'iid:!-;:iJ mO 

ni:':!8‘'x*'i:.s-a .lo trio ]:)'•'■ lo d-'i'xa 



n:'.r':''cbruxo''i x:' ..'. 9'i,r- 9.dj ^d 

xLiisd w.:ir>aia xuiYxxJ "' b : ■■''xedod. lo dl-H.' 




?;■ ;v::.tj '" ao'i..A. Uj"X'C o, 

O'lO'iO <: ■ .ILloo'^JzY 'd' dllV' 

''"■'Id' jiai-iffiai 

YX-IX):;0 a,'..rXiA.' c^-ui.<Sb '•"<> 

.adJCi ^•.r£v,..ic ...da.Xa^yXI 

,>o.d.:t;-..L ^'irov.idi.ci ^naci/inS 72 

.0 .ddc’i ea;i'7;:72J^'7.77i 

»o,ri;tdt .‘ixvlja' jr'oxi3-.i''I 
..oxIdP,! jCiaX,;. 

,xia±X3.!iX: 

-.odddX j-xx-vX-Xo „ rfoxlsxy'i 'd-- 

xii xXjojjddo'X aixx/^ou ' i 'sd'xA OAl'i ©iC. Yd Xon-oc l 
YoYbP: „TI x{i©d©;3±.t5< sa.rM Xo d-cxO 



SS*dS'J^ 

d?..ov.j; ' 
I.0S.3XJ 

■i73s. d. 


lA’S.ddl 

S.S'S.d'VJ 


Ss«svj 


j:«Q£3^M 
S.PS .id'd 


.r.X- .ddi 
£. . 
die 3; 

£ . dvd 

i..?:%3v£ 

c C' 



(a,/.; j . 


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ddXC.dSa 


de) .„ 


LOANS TO H. H. PS YOUNG MilMORIAL MUS5UI4 (Continued) 


L76.33 

L76.3^ 

L76.33 


L76*36.1 

L76.36.2 

L76.36.3 

L76.36.4 


L76.37.1-^ 


L76. 38. 1-112 


L77.1.1 

L77.1.2 


L77.2 


L77.3.1 

L77.3.2 

L77.3.3 

L77«3.^ 

L77.3.3 


L77.4 


*L77.5.1 

♦L77.5c2 


L77.6 (A,B) 


L77.? ( : 


STANDING NEt-lALE SHRINE FIGUNE , Nigeria, Ibo 

Loaned by The Fine Arts Museiiras Foundation 
Gift of Joe V/izen 

TAPESTRY FRAG^iE^TT , \^rool & silk 
Loaned by Harry Davis 

MIDDLE SLPIK WOVEN BASICET ^^ASK 

Loaned by The Fine Arts Museums Foundation 
Gift of Mr« & Mrs, V/illiam ICing Self, Jr, 

KOR MASK 

GABLE MASK 

BOARDS TUSK NECKLACE 

TURTLE SHELL MASK '■■/ITH FEATHERS 

Loaned by The Fine Arts Museums Foundation 
Gift of Victor J, Bergeron 

FOUR ANTIQUE LACE DOILIES 

Loaned by The Fine Arts Museums Foundation 
Gift of Mr, and Mrs, George H, Fitch 

COLLECTION OF 112 AFRICAN OBJECTS 

Loaned by The Fine Arts Museums Foundation 
(not recM at museum) 

Gift of Mr, & Mrs, Ralph Neely (Anonymously) 

PORTRAIT OF JAIffiS V/, SDiES , oil ptg by James Peale 
PORTRAIT OF ELIZA SIMES , oil ptg by James Peale 
Loaned by Mrs, V/, J, Montgomeiry 

CHARGER , brass, Flemish or German, 13th c. 

Loaned by Mrs, U, G, Hitchcock 

I4ARY WALTON MOPxRIS , oil ptg by John Wollaston 
LE\--/IS MORRIS , oil ptg by John V/ollaston 
MR, V/ILLSON , oil ptg by Unkno\m American Artist 
A CROW VILLAGE ON THE SAIMON PJVER , oil ptg by George Catlin 
THREE ^iANDATl VIARRIOPyS ARI-4SD FOR WAR , oil ptg by George Catlin 
Loaned bj’- The National Gallery of Art, V/ashington, D,C, 

BISHOP* S COPE , French, late l6th-early 17thc. 

Loaned by Edward Nagel 

STUJER TEA POT 

SILVER CREAI-iSR 

Loaned by Theresa and Arthur Greenblatt 

PAIR OF BRASS AI^TDIRONS , Baltimore, ca, I80O 
Loaned by De Silva Brothers 

LEEAND.^S'TANFORD*S PICNIC , oil ptg by Ernes te Narjot 
Loaned by Dr, Carl S, Dentzel 

\ifINTER , v;ood, polychrome sculpture, 19th c. 

Loaned by Victor Spark 


L77.8 


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-v:i.r;' oob 'lo 




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:riT:^r7"■ril 






dr/G “DIO dxjcd 

i 'Ki d;..i:'^0a-I: 


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^;_D";£OJAO 

1: Bd'TA 

(mxssass:^ ir. dc:?) 

J ■:. o'ih 10 :tli:D 

I.co oV.' ^.O 


J. »t.\ OW ^l.;. 

-SoO .-.eO'^O. 
■ *v' 


I^I*7'?<I 

S.r^v'VJ 


»c /v".- j r£G.:.;'X-?P dadf'G.rd .;::8£’xcf ;:£;'. 

:';o-.^0;b ii:r. ,8 ,1' TCi ben-Boi 

i.odBBlIOvJ ££i.iK..,. V'CJ I'i-i'q' Xi<^ 

rfc:r::-.'-XIol^' iidcX Td Ii.o ?^„._ 

-j-;f..i:.'j-7.:?i, .'xvi-ofcJiiU \J I.L:- 

VC g-i'-i .v.v> 

voeS) v.'^ 3:;q Ice . 

v'-yLcrfosI y -'A. io Xsc.cI-‘ -vriX j/l Iccror 


cv 

vcr Oi ■ 

■V^I'XJTv)-!?-!! ive’Cl : I'll 1 o ’ X 

levy' ,:■;. ..-j: 

liOc q-y.TY: 

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8.VIJ 


LOANS TO M. H. DE YOUNG I-IST-IORIAL MUSBM (Continued) 


L77.9.1 

L77.9.2 


L77.10 


L77.il 


L77.12.1 

L77.12.2 

L77.12,3 


L77.13 


L77.14 

L77.15 


L77.16 

L77.17 

L.77.18.1 

L.77.18.2 

L,77.19&20 
L. 77.21 


L,77.22,l 
L, 77. 22. 2 
L. 77. 22.3 
(A,B) 

L77.23.1 

L77.23.2 

L77.23.3 

L77.23.4 

L77.23.5 

L77.23.6 

L77.23.7 

L77.23.8 


L77.24 


L77.25.1 

L77.25.2 


MOTHBN AND TV/0 CHILDEEN , oil ptg by Mary Cassatt 
HOUSE IN SAN MATEO , iiratercolor by Edward Hopper 
Loaned by Mrs. Alexander Albert (Anonymously) 

VIEW FROM MALKASTEN LAWN , oil ptg by Albert Bierstadt 
Loaned by Mrs, Peter McBean 

TURKISH BATH, 1913 . watercolor by Charles Demuth 
Loaned by George Hopper Fitch. 

BASH-BISH FALLS , oil ptg by John F. Kensett 
PADDY FLANiNfIGAN . oil ptg by George Bellows 
STILL LIFE , oil ptg by Severin Roesen 

Loaned by Mr. and Mrs. V/ill Richeson, Jr. 

STILL LIFE , oil ptg by Rembrandt Peale 

Loaned by Mr. and Mrs. Robert C, Graliam 

STILL LIFE OF FRUITS , oil ptg by Alfred Maurer 
VENICE , monotype by Maurice Prendergast 

Loaned by V/illiarn S, Picher and V/alter C. Goodman 

PORTRAIT OF IZME VICIfERS , oil ptg by John Singer Sargent 
Loaned by David Pleydell-Bouverie 

NOT USED 

SUNSET, watercolor by John Marin 
GREEN RIVER , IaTYOMHG, watercolor by Thomas Moran 
Loaned by Mr. and Mrs. C. Thomas May, Jr. 

NOT USED 

"HA« I LIKE NOT THATS (OTHELLO) ”, cast sculpture by John Rogers 
Loaned by Robert V/. Zimmerman 

HARBOR SCENE , oil ptg by Robert Salmon 
BRASS FIPJPLACE FENDER . American, ca. l800 
BRASS AND IRON UREPLACE TONGS AND SHOVEL , ca. l800 
Loaned by Ted Samuel 

MARIA MYTILDA IVTNKLER , oil ptg by The DePeyster Painter 
MRS, CHAPvLES APTHORP . oil ptg by Robert Feke 
BOATMEN ON THE MISSOURI , oil ptg by George C. Bingham 
NIAGARA FALLS , oil ptg by Albert Bierstadt 
CRANBERRY PICKERS , oil ptg by Eastman Johnson 
STUDIO CORNER , oil ptg by William M. Chase 
BUDDHA OF KAMAICU~RA . watercolor by John La Farge 
KITCHEN AT \CCLLIAMSBURG , oil ptg by Charles Sheeler 
Loaned by Mr, and Mrs, John D, Rockefeller, 31*1 

INDIAN ENCAMPMENT , watercolor by Henry Famy 

Loaned by Mr, and Mrs, 0, G. Villard, Jr. (Anonjmiously) 

MAHOGANY SOFA , ca. l800 
MAHOGANY VJING CHAIR 

Loaned by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City 




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LOANS TO M. H. DE YOUNG !4EMORIAL MUSEUM (Continued) 


L77.26.1 

L77.26.2 

L77.26.3 

L77.26.4 

L77.26.5 

L77.26.6 

L77.26.7 

L77.26.8 


L77*27 


L77.28 


L77.29 


L77.30 


L77.31 


L77.32 


L77.33 


*L77.34 


L77.35.1 
L77.35.2 
L77,35.3(A,B) 
L77.33.4(A,B) 
L77.33.5, 6 


L77.36.1 

L77.36.2 

L77.36.3 


L77.37.l-3 

L77.37.4 


L77.38 


SIMER, oil ptg by V/illiara Bradford 
li/INTER , oil ptg by V/illiam Bradford 
JOHN H, BKEVICR , arnbrotype by R. S* Robins 
CHILD IN STRIPES ON CHAIR , photo by Unknown Photographer 
TV/0 V/OMEN, tintype by Unknora American Photographer 
THE TERMINAL, 1892 , gravure print by Alfred Steiglitz 
GRAND CANYON OF THE YELLOWSTONE , sepia print by W. H. Jackson 
ANIMAL LOCOMOTION, Plate 188 / photo by Eadweard Muybridge 
Loaned by Tlie Oakland Museum, Art Division 

STILL LIFE ("THE GAZETEER'O , oil ptg by William M. Harnett 
Loaned by Mr* and Mrs* Dean B. McNealy (Anonymously) 

FARMER kHETTING HIS SCYTHE , oil ptg by V/illiam S. Mount 

Loaned by The Museums of Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 

EXHIBITION (Galleries A 8c B) ; THE SOUND OF FLIGHT * 7 drawings, 

2 silver drum brushes, chair, microphone and stand, stereo 
r equipment* 

Loaned by Tom Mariori 

LOW BOY (DRESSING TABLE) , Baltimore, ca I 760/63 
Loaned by Mrs* Theodore Meltzer (Anonymously) 

USHAXJUG, Turkey, 17thc. 

Loaned by H* McCoy Jones 

MAN^S THREE PLECE SUIT W/ACCESSORIES , ca I 883 

Loaned by The Los Angeles County Museum of Art 

BROADSIDE ADVERTISEMENT * print, N. Currier 
Loaned by Warren Hox-/ell 

MARKET SCENE w/STILL LIFE , oil ptg by Bernardo Strozzi 
Loaned by Stanley Moss 

PUNCH BOWL/OPEN TUREEN , green "Tltzhugh" pattern, ca l8thc, 
GINGER JAR TlMDSIJaP^ FISHING ), Chinese 

PAIR OF COVERED VEGETABLE DISHES 

m^'po~T ^ ~ 

TV/0 PLATES 

Loaned by Ian McKibbin l#iite 

GLACIER, 1879 % dravriJig by John Singer Sargent 
LIFE STUDY CLASS , drawing by John Singer Sargent 
GATHERING GPJVIN , drawing by John Singer Sargent 

Loaned by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York 

THREE POSTCAP.DS; MIDV/INTER FAIR 

FINE ARTS BUILDING, MIDWINTER EXPOSITION , col lithograph 
Loaned by F* Lanier Graham 

VIEV/ OF STATUARY, CRYSTAL PALACE , col lithograph 
Loaned by Donelson F* Hoopes (Anonymously) 


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LOANS TO M. H. DE YOUNG MORTAL MUSEM (Continued) 


L77.39 

L77.^0 

L77.^1 

L77.42 

L77.^3 

L77.^^ 

L77.45 

L77. ^6.1-2 

L77.47.l-5 


LIBRARY TABLE , oak, by Gustav Stickley, ca, 1905 
Loaned by Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mattison 

SILVER NAVAJO NBCKLACE , Ainerican, 20th c. 

Loaned by V/est of the Moon 

EXHIBITION (Gallery H) : " THE ASMAT " 

13 photographs, 1 costume, 1 wooden shield 
Loaned by Laurens Hillhouse 

21 PHOTOGPJiPHS OF BORNEO plus SEVEN ETHIHC OBJECTS 
Loaned by JuJLie Heifetz 

E:(HIBITI0N (Gallery B) : DRA'vIENGS 8c SCULPTURE, LOUVINA V/ONG 
Loaned by Louvina Wong 

GORLECTION OF 44 PIECES OF SCRIMSHAW (SPECIAL EXHIBITION) 

Loaned by Darlene Pearson 

EXHIBITION (Gallery A) : PHOTOGRAPHS BY DONNA-LEE PHILLIPS 
Loaned by Donna-Lee Phillips 

TWO HANDCOLORED PHOTOGRAPHS (for possible future exhibition) 
Loaned by Lynn Hershman 

FIVE EAPJLY AI4ERICAN AND ESICTMO ITE^'IS FOR SPECIAL EjCHIBITION 
Loaned by Bill Pearson 




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i 


APPENDIX III 


ADDITIONS TO THE COLLECTIONS OF TI-IE CALIFORNIA PALACE OF THE LEGION OF HONOR 

1976.5 PORTRAIT OF AH^A SEVENING , I906, oil/canvas, American 
by Louis Betts (lS73-19^l) 

Gift of Laiirrence and Phillip V/estdahl 

1976.6 ST. JEROME IN HIS STUDY , oil/canvas, French 
by Claude Vignon (1593-1670 ) 

Gift of the Mildred Anna Williams Fund 

1976.7 TV/0 WOMEN EXCHANGING CON~FIDENCES , pastel/paper/canvas, French 
by Edmond-Fran9ois Aman-Jean (1^53-1955 ) 

Gift of the Mildred Anna Williams Fund 

1976.8 LA SOURCE , bronze sculpture, French 
by Edme Bouchardon (1693-1762) 

Gift of the Mildred Anna Williams Fund 

1977.1 Prints accessioned by the Department of Prints & Drav/ings 

1977.2 Drawings accessioned by the Department of Prints & Dravd.ngs 
(See Appendix I) 

1977.3 CALIFORNIA POPPIES , 1976, tapestry, American 
designed by Mark Adams, woven at Museum 
Gift of the Artist 

1977.^ THE ROCKS IN THE PARK OF TOE CHATEAU NOIR , oil/canvas, French 
by Paul CSzanne (l^39-1906) ’ — — 

Gift of the Mildred Anna 'Williams Fund 

1977.5. 172 PIECE FPl^NCH XIX CENTURY PORCELAIN DINNER SERVICE 

I-I72 Chateau Randan marks by Sevres factory from lo39 
Gift of Mrs, Alexander de Bretteville 

1977.6 SAINT BARBARA , c. 1475* limestone sculp tiire, French 
by an Unknown Artist 

Gift of Paul Ballora 

1977.7 PASTORAL LANDSCAPE , c. 1790-l800, oil/canvas, French 
by Louis Gabriel Moreau the Elder (l7^0-l8o6) 

Gift of the Mildred Anna Williams Fund 

1977.8 LA PARTIE QUAERES , 1712, oil/canvas, French 
by Antoine Watteau (1684-1721) 

Gift of the Mildred Anna Williams Fund 

Correction to the Annual Report of 1975-1976 

The following painting has been reassigned to the collections of the M. H, 
de Young Memorial Museixm, and has therefore been renumbered as shown below: 

1976.4 LA BAIGNADE (The Bathing Place), 1786, oil painting, French 
becomes by Joseph Vernet (1714-1789) 

76.29 Georgia M, Worthington Fund Purchase 


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Loar:^'? FROM the Lepiion of Honor 


1962.21 


1966.50 


19 ^ 1.28 


1941.6 


1958.11 


1950.30 


1951.28 


HARVEST TIME , I 873 , TO: Villa Hugel, Essen, Germany 

oil painting by 9/22/76-12/12/76 

William Hahn AND: Osterreichisches Museum Ftir 

( 1829 - 1887 ) Angewandte Kunst, Vienna, Austria 

1/16/77-3/31/77 

FOR ; FRONTIER Al^IERICA: THE FAR WEST 
EXHIBITION, INDIANS AND SETTLERS IN 
THE AI4ERICAN VJEST , continuing exhibition 
circulated by The Museum of Fine Arts, 
Boston, since January 1975 


FEMALE TORSO , black TO; Tlie San Francisco Museum of Modern 

granite sculpture by Art, San Francisco 

Beniamino Benvenuto Bufano Sept, 3-Nov. 21, 1976 
( 1898 - 1970 ) AND: The National Collection of Fine 

Arts, Smithsonian Institution, 
V/ashington, D.C., May 20-Sept. 11, 1977 
FOR ; PAINTING AND SCULPTURE IN CALIF- ^ 
ORTJIA, THE MODEPl^ ERA 


ON THE RIVER MEUSE , 

oil painting by 
Louis Eugene Boudin 

(1824-1898) 

SACRAMENTO VALLEY 
IN SPRING , oil painting 
Alfred Bierstadt 

( 1830 - 1902 ) 


TO; The Santa Barbara Museum of Art 
Santa Barbara, California 
Oct, 9-Nov. 24, 1976 
FOR; BOUDIN, PxRECURSOR OF D^IPRESSIONISM 

TO; The Nev; Milv/aiikee Art Center, 1976 
Milwaukee, V/isconsin, Oct. l4-Nov, 28, 
FOR: FOREIGN BORN ARTISTS 


LE PONT DE LA TOURNELLE , TO; Smith College Museum of Art, Mass., 
PAPJS , 1851, oil painting Oct, l4 - Dec, 5» 1976 

AND: Sterling and Francine Clark Art 
Institute, Williamstown, Mass, 

Dec. 17, 1976 - Feb. 13, 1977 
FOR; JONGKIND AND THE PRE-IMPRESSIONISTS ; 

PAINTERS OF THE ECOLE SAINT-SIMEON 


STILL :UFE, 1778 , oval 
oil painting by 
Anne Vallayer-Coster 

(1744-1818) 


TO; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 

Dec. 21, 1976 -Mar. 13 , 1977 
AND; University Art Museum, Austin, 

Texas, April 12- June 5, 1977 
AND: Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pa,, 
July 14-Sept. 4, 1977 
AND; The Brooklyn Museum, New York, 

Oct, 4 -Nov, 27, 1977 
FOR; WOITEN ARTISTS: 1550-1950 


STARLINGS, CARAVANS, 1948 TO; Herbert F, Johnson Museum, Ithaca, 
oil painting by New York, Jan. 26-Mar. 13, 1977 

Kay Sage (I 898 -I 963 ) AND: University of Maryland Art Gallery, 

College Park, Md., April 5-May 15, 1977 
AND: Albany Institute of History and Art, 
New York, June 8- July 20, 1977 
FOR: KAY SAGE EXHIBITION 


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Loans FROM the Lef^ion of Honor (Continued ) 


1975 * 5.13 STANDING MDE , polished steel TO; University of California, 


Mary Porter Sesnon Art Gallery, 
Santa Cruz, California 
Feb, 13 -Mar. 13 , 1977 
FOR; MODERN SCULPTURE; EUROPEAN AITO 

AMERICAN WORKS IN V/EST COAST 

COLLECTIONS 


sculpture by 
Alexander Archipenko 
( 1887 - 1964 ) 

1273.71 V/OMAN VriTR A CRAB , small 
bronze sculpture by 
Aristide Maillol (l 86 l- 1944 ) 

1973 . 5.19 DOE WITH LIFTED LEG , bronze 
sculpture by 

Elie Nadelman ( 1885 - 1946 ) 

1974.11 HEAD OF A JEV/ISH BOY . l 892 
bronze sculp tujre by 
Medardo Rosso (I858-I928) 

54.2 THE GOOD MOTHER, or THE VIRGIN TO; The Taft Museum, Cincinnati, Ohio 

V/ITH THE CHILD IN THE CRADLE , Mar. 24 -May 8, 1977 
AFTER REMBRANDT , painting by FOR: Their commemorative exhibition 
Jean Honore Fragonard THE BEST OF FIFTY (Museums) 

(1732-1806) 


13 Theater & Dance Collection Sculptures ; 

T 8 cD 1962.129 KARSAVINA , and * 

T&DI962.I3O PAVLOVA AS GISELLE , and 
T&DI962.I32 PAVLOVA IN BACCHANALE , and 
T 8 J) 1962.143 KARSAVINA IN PETROUCHKA , all 
by Seraphin Soudbinine 
T&DI962.I34 FANNY ELSSLER IN LE DIABLE 
BOITEUX , by Jean Auguste 
Barre 


TO; California State University, 
Fresno, California, 

April 17 - May 8 , 1977 
FOR: FESTIVAL: A CELEBPJ^TION OF THE 
ARTS AT THE BEGINNING OF THE CENTURY 
THE SPIRIT OF ISilDORA DUNCAN / THE" 

VISIOM OF SERGE DIAGHILBV 


T8CDI962.I39 PAVLOVA 8 c NOVIKOFF IN LA PERI . 
1959.62 PAVLOVA & MORDKIN IN BACCHANALS , 
1959.72 PAVLOVA IN LA GAVOTTE , all 

by Malvina Hoffman ( 1887 - 1966 ) 
T8DI962.145 PAVLOVA SEATED. 1915 . by Paul 
Troubetzkoy (I866-I938) 

T&DI962.I3O VIOLININE . by Paul de 
Boulogne (d. 1938) 

1959.75 PAVLOVA IN SWAN LAKE . 

1959.76 NIJINSICY AS HARLEQUIN IN CARNAVAL , 

1959.77 FOIgNE AS HARLEQUIN IN CygTAVAL , 

all by Emanuel Rosales (l 873 -n.(i. ) 


Min. 53 AMERICAN PAINTINGS TRANSFERRED 
from CALIFORNIA PALACE OF THE LEGION 
OF HONOR 


TO: M, H. de Yoxmg Memorial Museum, 
May 1977 

FOR: Consideration for Inclusion in 
New American Galleries Installation 


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Loans TO the California Palace of the Lepiion of Honor 


3176 PORTRAIT OF ALT-IA SEVEIIING , painting by Louis Betts 

loan offered as gift by Lawrence V/estdahl (became 1976o3) 

32.76 LACEMAKER«S PILLOW , lent by Kaethe KLiot 
33*76 LACEMKER’S PILLOV/ ^ lent by Gertrude Biermann 

Lent for museimi lace collection esdhibition 

3^*76 SLEEPING LIOMESS , painting by Eugene Delacroix 

Extended loan by The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art 

35*76 LE PONT DU CHATOUT , painting by Mauii.ce Vlaminck 

Lent anonymously to the French paintings reinstallation 

36.76 VIEW OF THE COLOSSEUM, ROME , painting by Antonio Canaletto 
Anonymous loan, declined for purchase 

37*76 ST. JEROME IN I-HS STUDY , painting by Claude Vignon 
Anonymous loan, which became a gift (1976.6) 

38*76 LA SOURCE , bronze sculpture by Edme Bouchardon 
Anonymous loan, which became a gift (1976.8) 

39*76 DEUX FEMMES EN CONFIDENCE * pastel by EcF. Aman-Jean 
Anonymous loan, which became a gift (1976.8) 

40.76 HARMONY IN GREEN AND PINK , painting by James A. V/histler 
Anonymous loan, declined for purchase 

41.76.1 CHRIST APPEARING TO SAINT PETER , Flemish l6th Cen. Tapestry 
Lent by Grace Cathedral for exhibition and extended loan 

41.76.2 VIRGIN’S I^ANTLE . Polish l8th Cen. Tapestry Cape 
Lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art 

41.76.3 ST. PAUL/PLAUTILLA’S VEIL . Franco-Ilemish late 15th Cen. Tapestry 
Lent by The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

41.76.4 THE RESURRECTION TAPESTRY, REDEMPTION SERIES , 1510, Flemish Tapestry 
Lent by The Art Institute of Chicago 

41.76.5 MAY AND JULY, FROM THE MORTLAKE MONTHS , l8th Cen. Tapestry 
Lent by Mr, and Mrs, Fred Kohlenberg 

41.76.6 GREAT WING . American Tapestry by Mark Adams 
Lent by Mr, Cyril Magnin 

41.76.7 ECCE HOMO , flemish 15th Cen, Tapestry 

Lent by the University Art Museum, Berkeley 
To ”Five Centuries of Tapestry Exhibition" 

42.76 UPSET , painting by Joseph Decker 

Loan offered as Gift by Alfred Frankenstein (became 77*7) 

43.76. CAROUSEL ANIMALS . Lent by Maurice Fraley for "A is for Animal" 

1-3 

44.76 SKETCH FOR A TAPESTRY , drawing lent by Ihrs. Anna Bennett 
To "Five Centuries of Tapestry Exhibition" 




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^5.76.1-72 

4^?.76,1-37 

47.76.1- 2 

48.76.1- 31 

49.76.1- 16 

50.76.1- 2 

51.76.1- 8 

52.76.1- 17 

53.76.1- 24 

54.76.1- 57 

55.76.1- 10 

56.76.1- 5 

57.76.1- 2 

58.76.1- 4 

59.76.1- 11 

60.76.1- 25 

61.76.1- 2 

62. 76.1- 14 

63.76.1- 7 

64.76.1- 21 

65.76.1- 5 

66.76.1- 4 

67.76.1- 5 

68.76.1- 10 

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72.76 

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77.76 


(1977 Loans 

1.77 


2.77 


4.77 


5.77 


GROUPS OF ANIMAL TOYS & AHTIFACTS , as numbered at left were lent 
to the "A is for Animal” exhibition by the following Lenders, 
(from California, unless otherwise indicated): 

Museum of New Mexico, Folk Art Division, Santa Fe 
Lowie Museum of Anthropology, Berkeley 
David Mather, Santa Fe, New Mexico 
The Oakland Museum, Oakland, Calif, 

Ward ICimball, San Gabriel, Calif. 

Charles Gast, Sonoma, Calif, 

Fill Pearson, San Francisco, Calif. 

Elsa Cameron, San Francisco, Calif. 

George Gerhard, San Francisco, Calif. 

NOAII«S ARK (I), George Cody, Palo Alto 

National Gallery of Art, Index of Design, V/ashington, D.C. 

Bob Gross, Lafayette 

R, E, Lewis, San Rafael 

Japan Airlines, San Francisco 

Ruth Chriss, Palo Alto 

Elsa Cameron, San Francisco 

Marshall Roath, San Francisco 

Katherine Rossbach, Berkeley 

Imogen and John Gieling, San Francisco 

Jean Johnson, San Francisco 

Tony Galarza, San Francisco 

Susan Hoy, Susan's Storeroom, San Anselmo 

Shelley Dowell, San Francisco 

Susan Harrison, Forest Knolls 

NOAH'S ARK (ll), George Cody, Palo Alto 

Ian McKibbin Vihite, Ross 

Museujn of the City of New York, New York 

DENTZEL REINDEER , Maurice Fraley, Berkeley 

Museum of New Mexico, History Division, Santa Fe 

JAPANESE CLOCKl'/OPvK BIRD , John Wilson, San Francisco 

John V/ilson, San Francisco 

VIEVif OF TIVOLI , painting by Gaspard Dughet 
Anonymous loan, declined for purchase 

HEROIC LANDSCAPE , painting by Gaspard Dughet 
Anonymous loan declined for purchase 

IN to Legion;) 

PASTURES NEli/ , painting by Farny 
Anonymous loan, for one-day viewing 

PORTRAITS OF THE COUNT AIR> COUNTESS OF RANCHICOURT 

Pair of paintings by Theodore Chasseriau 

Anonymous loans, declined for purchase 

MARINE SCENE , American 1913 Tapestry - Herter loom 
Anonymous loan, which became a gift (77.5) 

PORTRAIT OF J, B, COLBERT , painting by P. de Champaigne 
Anonymous extended loan 


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Loans TO The Legion of Honor (Continued ) 


6.77 COFFEE LUCE , painting by John Sloan 
Anonymous loan 

7.77.1 A MAREIAGE CONTRACT , oil painting, by Jean Baptiste Greuze 

7.77.2 PORTRAIT OF THE DUC D» ORLEANS , drawing 

7.77.3 SEPTIMUS SEVERUS REPROACHING CARACALLA , oil painting 
Lent by the Musee du Louvre to the Greuze Exhibition 

8.77.1 PORTRAIT OF AN OLD WOMAN , Private Collection, Paris 

8.77.2 S EATED MAN HOLDING A BOOK , Mus6e Lyonnais 

8.77.3 SEATED OLD V/OMAN hUTH HANDS CLASPED , Musee Lyonnais 
8.77.^ SEATED MAIE NUDE , Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris 
8.77.3 PORTPJO:T of Joseph , Mus6e du Louvre, Paris 

8,77.6 STUDY OF LALIVE DE JULLY , V/allraf Collection, London 

8.77o7 GENOESE V/OMAN SELLING FLOliJERS , Museum Boymans-van Beuningen, Rotte 

8.77.8 PEASANT WOMAN OF PARMA , Museum Boyraans-van Beuningen 

8.77.10 INDOLENCE , Wadsworth AtheneiM, Hartford, Conn, 

8.77.11 STUDY FOR SEATED MAN TUNING A GUITAR , Bibliotheque Nationale 

8.77.12 THE FOWLER , Museum Narodwe, V/arsaw, Poland 

8.77.13 OLD V/OMAN WITH ARMS OUTSTRETCHED , McCrindle, New York 

8.77.16 PORmiT OF ABBE GOUGENOT , Musee de Dijon 

8.77.17 PORTRAIT OF GEORGE GOUGENOT , Musee Royaux, Brussels 

8.77.18 MADAIiE DE GOUGENOT , New Orleans Museum of Art 

8.77.19 PORTRAIT OF ABRAHAM DE ROQUENCOURT , Wildenstein, New York 

8.77.20 PORTRAIT OF MLLE, COURTEILLE , Brunswick, Germany 

8.77.21 PORTPvAIT OF MARQUISE DE BESONS , Baltimore Museum of Art 

8.77.23 silence; LE REPOS , Collection of the Queen, London 

8.77.24 YOUNG SHEPHERD WITH FLOVffilR , Petit Palais, Paris 

8.77.25 DPvAVJING AFTER RUBENS , V/olf Collection, New York 

8.77.28 THE IMPROPER PROPOSAL , Collection Stralem, New York 

8.77.29 THE SURPRISED HOUSEKEEPER, Musee Grobet-Labadie , fferseilles 

8.77.30 STUDY FOR A MARRIAGE CONTRACT , Petit Palais, Paris 

8.77.31 HEAD OF AN OLD t-lAN, STUDY , Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven 

8.77.32 HEAD OF A GIRL, STUDY , Private Collection, New York 

8.77.33 YOUNG MAN STANDING, STUDY , Art Institute, Chicago 

8.77.35 PORTRAIT OF V/ATELET , Private Collection, Paris 

8 . 77.36 PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST , Ashmolean Museum, Oxford 

8.77.37 PORTPJIIT OF THE BISHOP OF MACON, Musee Municipal, Macon, France 

8.77.40 PORTMIT OF CHEVALIER DAMERY , Private Collection, Boston 

8.77.41 DEPARTURE FOR THE IfflT NURSE , Norton Simon, Los Angeles 

8.77.42 RETURN FROM THE ITST NURSE , Norton Simon, Los Angeles 

8 . 77.43 THE MOTEIEELY REPR.IMAND , Clark Art Institute, Williamstown 

8.77.46 SEATED ELDERLY WOMAN , Musee du Louvre, Paris 

8 . 77.47 SEATED FEMALE FIGUPI] , Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford 

8.77.48 THE UNGRATEFUL SON , Musee des Beaux-Arts, Lille 

8 . 77.49 THE PUNISHED SON , MusSe des Beaux-Arts, Lille 

8 . 77.50 PORTRAIT OF DENIS DIDEROT , The Morgan Library, New York 

8 . 77.51 DEATH OF A GOOD FATHER , Private Collection, Strasbourg 
8 , 77,32 DEATH OF A CRUEL FATHER , Musee Greuze, Tournus 

8 . 77.54 THE DEPARTURE OF A YOUNG SAVOYARD , Amsterdam Museum 

8.77.55 CHILD PLAYING VJITH A DOG , Private Collection, Ixjndon 


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RECAPITULATION OF ITEIiS ILINDLED BY THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTI^AR 

CALIFOPJ'ttA PAL.ACE OF THE LEGION OF HONOR MSEUM - Fiscal Year 1976-1977 

(Not including those accessioned by the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts) 




IN 

OUT 

TOTAL 

Additions to the Permanent 

Collections 

l 8 l 

-- 

l 8 l 

Collection Objects Loaned 

to Borrov;ers 

12 

25 

37 

Temporary Exhibition Loans 

to the Museum 

938 

1132 

2070 

Possible Acquisition Loans 

to the Museum 

21 

13 

34 

Extended & liiscellaneous Loans to the Museum 

32 

276 . 

308 

TOTAL NUMBER OF ART OBJECTS IN MOVE£-IEI\fT 
PROCESSED BY THE PJDGISTPJIR; RECEIVED, 

EXAMINED, DESCRIBED, PJIGISTSRED, PJICEIPTED, 
PxECORDED, INSUPJID, DELIVERED & FORV/ARDED IN 
SHIPMENT 

1184 

1446 

2630 


PERI^ANENT COLLECTION PHOTOGRAPH ORDERS 
Ordered, Labeled, Invoiced & Forwarded 

No. of 
Orders 

No. of 
Photographs 

July-Deceraber 

1976 

15 

19 

J anuar y- June 

1977 

28 


TOTALS: 


43 

61 


- 75 - 


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Loans TO the Legion of Honor (Continued ) 


8.77.57 

8.77.58 

8.77.59 

8.77.60 

8.77.61 

8.77.62 

8.77.63 
8 . 77 . 6 ^ 
8.77.66 
8.77.67 

8.77.71 

8.77.72 

8.77.73 
8.77.7^ 
8.77.76 

8.77.78 

8.77.79 

8.77.80 
8.77.83 

8.77.85 

8.77.86 

8.77.89 

8.77.90 

8.77.91 

8.77.92 

8.77.93 
8.77.9^ 
8.77.95 

8.77.97 

8.77.98 
8.77.100 

8.77.102 

8.77.103 

8.77.104 

8,77.10^ 

8.77.107 

8.77.108 

8.77.109 

8.77.110 

8.77.112 

8.77.113 

8.77.11^ 


LOT AKD HIS DAUGHTERS , Private Collection, Strasbourg 

FEMALE NUDE STUDY , Ins ti tut Neerlandais, Paris 

SEATED FEMALE NUDE , Fogg Musetun of Art, Cambridge 

CIMON AND PEPvO , Musee du Louvre, Paris 

SEATED V/OMAN V/ITH BOOK , STUDY, Musle Greuze, Tournus 

STUDY FOR SOPHHONIE . Staatliche Kunsthalle, Karlsruhe 

KN.EELING YODTH, STUDY , Fogg Museum of Art, Cambridge 

FEMALE ITUDE , Private Collection, Paris 

TES FUNEPAL OF PATROCLUS , Private Collection, Paris 

STUDIES OF HEADS AFTEP MTIQUE MEDALS , Musee T.yon 

GREUZE & HIS MOTHER , fevate Collectd.on, Paris 

WOMAN Vi/ITH A SPANIEL , Mus^e d' Angers, Angers 

THE DREAMER , Wildenstein and Co. , New York 

MADAME DU BAP^RY , V/ildenstein and Co. , New York 

WOMAN V/ITH HAI'IDS CLASPED , MusSe des Beaujc-Arts, Dijon 

THE LOVE LETTER , Collection Wolf, New York 

the PvETURN of the young hunter , Mnneapolis Institute of Ai-ts 
THE RETURN OF THE OUTLAW , Wadsworth Atheneum, Hai'tfoi-d 
HEAD^ of a BOYV CoilectTon Megret, PaadLs 
HEAD OF A MAn\ Private Collection, Baltimore 
embrace, study , Institut Neerlandais, Paris 
THE BOAT OF HAPPINESS , Museum Boyraans, Rotterdam 
THE BOAT OF IC^FORTUNE , Mus6e Greuze, Tournus 
THE WHITE HAT , Boston Museimi of Fine Arts 
MAI^ STANDING ~V/ITH ARM UPRAISED , British Museum, London 
TVJO HANTS, STUDY , Yale University Art Gallery, Nex^ Haven 
THE DRUNKEN COBBLER , Portland Art Museum 
iPORTRAlT' OF ARTIST , Mus^e du Louvre, Paris 
~^C0'NCILIA^0t'l ,~ Ri'oenix Art Museum, Arizona 
the lECOMPENBE R^TJSED , British Museum, London 
INNOCET'fCE CAREEET OFF BY CUPID , MusSe du Louvre, Paris 
portrait of baron l^lALCidj^AIIR , " Collection Walckenaer Family 
portent of JEANNE-PEEllBERTE LEDOUX , Semans Collection, N, C. 
PORTRAIT OF A WO^IAN AS CALLISTOV Delacorte Collection, Nex^^ York 
C0I4TESSS MOLUIIi AS A CHIID Baltimore Museum of Art 
PORTRAIT OF BILLAHD^VaRENNE , Dallas Museum of Fine Arts 
MONSIEUR DE SOMBREUIL AS PRISOi^IER OF THE REVOLUTION, 

Private Collection, Paris 

PORTRAIT OF NAPOLEON BONAPARTE , Collection Fabius, Paris 
ST, MARY OF EGYPT liCCTH A SKULL , Musle des Beaux- Arts, Dijon 
THE DEPARTURE TOR THE HUNT , MusSe du Louvre 
ST. I4ARY OF EGYPT , dirysler Museum, Norfolk, Va. 

PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST , Musle des Beaux Arts, Marseille 

Lent by the Wadsworth Atheneum to the Greuze Exhibition 


9.77 LA PARTIE QUARREE , painting by Watteau 
Anonymous loan which became a gift (1977.8) 

10.77 PROPOSED MOI^IENT FOR ELLIS ISLAND-FRAI'IK^TER 
D^raxd.ng by Claus Oldenberg ('POth Century) 

Lent from Private Los Angeles Collection to the 
American Watercolors & DraxvLngs Exhibition 


- 76 - 


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Loans TO the Lep:ion of Plonor (Continued) 


11.77 


12„77. 

1-265 

13.77 


14.77.1 

14.77.3 

14.77.5 

14.77.2 

14.77.4 

14.77.6 


15.77 


16.77 

17.77 

18.77 

19.77 

20.77 

21.77 

22.77 

23.77 

24.77 

25.77 


unnumbered 


26.77 


27.77 


CHELSEA SHOP , drawing by James A, VJhistler 
Lent by The Art Institute of Chicago to the 
American V/atercolors & Drawings Esdiibition 

265 American Watercolors and Drawings 

Exhibition organized by American Federation of the Arts, NYC 

85 Assorted Handprinted & Published Works of Calligraphy 

on paper by Frie^ich Neugebauer (b, ISll/ Kojetein, l^Iahren, 

Geixnany). Lent for "The Art of Calligraphy” ExOiibition 

THE BROKEN EGGS , oil painting by Jean Baptiste Greuze (Cat. 9) 

HEAD OF AN ELDERLY WOMAN , red chalk drawing (Cat, 27) 

RIVER GOD, STUDY D drav/ing (Cat. 56) 

AEGINA VISITED BY JUPITER , oil painting (Cat. 65) 

THE ANGRY WOMAN , drawing (Cat. 96) 

ANACREON IN HIS Op AGE CROVJNED BY LOVE , drawing. Straus 
Collection (101) 

Lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Straus Collection 
to the Greuze Exhibition 

LANDSCAPE , painting by Moreau the Elder (l740-l8o6) French 
Anonymous loan, which became a gift (1977.7) 

V/OMAN 8t CHILD FEEDING \7ATER FOIJL , painting by Claude Monet 
STREET SCENE , painting by Maurice Utrillo 
ORCTIARD AT PONTOISE , painting by Paul CSzanne 
PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN , x^ainting by Eugene Speicher 
DRAVilNG OF A WOMAN , dra\o.ng by John Singer Sargent 
DRAVi/ING OF VEIDECE , by Francesco Guardi 
RIO MAGDALENA, painting by Frederic E, Church 
DRAWING OF A CHI^IESE GIRL , by Eugene E, Speicher 
MOTHER AI'ID CHILD , drypoint by Mary Cassatt 
PING PONG PLAYERS , painting by Milton Avery 
Lent from a Private Collection 

8 PAINTINGS & DRAVJINGS 

Lent from a Life Estate Gift Collection 

JACOB *S LADDER , Tapestry Fragment after B, van Orley 
Anonymous loan, offered to collection (became 77. l4) 

MARKET SCENE VHTR STILL LIFE , painting by Strozzi (l58l-l684) 
Anonymous loan, declined for purchase 

THE SEINE AT ARGENTEUIL , l875, painting by Claude Monet 
Extended Loan from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art 


28.77 


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Loans TO the Lep:ion of Honor (Continued ) 


Unntunbered 

23.11 

30.77 

31.77 

32.77 

33.77 

3^.77. 
a — d 


3 FLENCH PAINTINGS 

Iient from a Private Collection 

NUDE STUDY FOR THE DPJDSSED BALLET DMCER , bronze sculpture 
by Edgar Degas^ (1^34-1917) » Ft'ench 

Extended Loan from William M, Roth 

CUPID & VENUS AT VULCAN »S FORGE , painting by LeSueur 
Anonymous loan, which became a gift (1977.10) 

YELLOV/ CALLA LILY , 1927, painting by Georgia O'Keeffe 
Anonyraoiis loan 

TROMPE L'OEIL , painting by Louis-Leopold Boilly 
Anonymous loan 

AUTOMTE CLOCK , l6th Century German 
Loan by Yale University Art GaJ.lery to 
"The Triumph of Humanism" Exhibition 

h DOCUMENTS FROM A FAIgLY COLLECTION 
3 hand lettered Certificates of Award, il’amed 
1 City of San Francisco Resolution of Honorary Citizenship, 
Lent from the Private Collection of a Museum Donor 


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APPENDIX IV 


DEPAROIIENT OF PUBLIC PROGRAJ^IS 


1, T\A/ilight Concerts by the San Francisco Qiamber Orchestra 


(May 13, 1976) 
(May 30, 1976) 

July 29, 1976 
August 3, 1976 


— previous fiscal yeeir but 


part of 1976 stunmer season 


May 29 , 1977 


2* Exhibition Related Programs 


As We Were, As We Are - Educational Programs 


October 9, 1976 — 
October I 6 , 1976 — 
October 23, 1976 — 
October 30, 1976 — 
November 6, 1976 — 
November 13, 1976 - 
November 20, 1976 - 
November 27, 1976 - 
December 4, 1976 — 
December 11, 1976 - 
December I 8 , 1976 - 
December 19, 1976 - 
January 8, 1977 — 
January 13, 1977 — 


Opening Day Celebration 
Lecture/Discussion/Slide Presentation 
Debate/Panel Discussion 
Panel Discussion 
Dialogue 

Lecture/Slide Presentation 
Lecture/Slide Presentation 
Panel Discussion 
Lecture/Panel Discussion 
Lecture 

City V/alking Tour 
City V/alking Toiur 
Lecture/Slide Presentation 
Lecture/Slide Presentation 


As V/e Vfere, As V/e Are - Film Series 


October 17, 1976 
October 24, 1976 
October 31, 1976 
November 7, 1976 
November l4, 1976 
November 21, 1976 
November 28, 1976 
December 5, 1976 
December 12, 1976 
December 19, 1976 
January 9, 1977 
January I 6 , 1977 
January 23, 1977 


““ "San Francisco" 

— "The Maltese Falcon" 

— "It Came From Beneath the Sea" 

— "Bullitt" 

— "Greed" 

— "Old San Francisco" 

— "Dark Passage" 

— "Barbary Coast" 

— "Frisco Jenny" 

— "Gentleman Jim" 

— "Experiment in Terror" 

— "The Conversation" 

— "Petulia" 


- 79 - 


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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PROGRAMS (Continued) 
Exhibition Related Programs (Continued) 


Five Centuries of Tapestry — Performing Arts Series 


November 20 , 
November 21 , 
November 27 , 
November 28 , 
December k, 
December 
December 11 , 
December 12 , 
December l8, 
December 1 $, 
January 1$, 
January l6, 
January 22 , 
January 23 , 


1976 — Double performances by Amici Musicae 
1976 — Double performance by Aiiiici Musicae 
1976 — Lute concert in the galleries 
1976 — UC Davis Early Music Ensemble 
1976 — Harmonice Musices 
1976 — Harmonice Musices 

1976 — Double performance by SF Actors Ensemble 
1976 — . Double performance by SF Actors Ensemble 
1976 — . Double performance by SF Actors Ensemble 

1976 -- Double performance by SF Actors Ensemble 

1977 — Martha Cook, harpsichordist 
1977 — Martha Cook, harpsichordist 

1977 — Baroque flute and harpsichord concert 
1977 Baroque flute and harpsichord concert 


Five Centuries of Tapestry ~ International Symposium 


Saturday and Sunday, November 20 and 21 , 1977 


Masterpieces of Primitive Art - Educational Programs 


March 27 , 1977 
April 3 , 1977 
April 10 , 1977 
April 17 , 1977 
April 2 k, 1977 
May 1 , 1977 
May 8 , 1977 
May 15 , 1977 
May 22 , 1977 
May 29, 1977 
June 5 , 1977 


Opening Day Celebration 
films on Africa 
films on Oceania 
films on the Americas 
films on the Americas 
films on Africa 
films on the Americas 
films on the Americas 
films on Oceania 
films on Oceania 
films on Africa 


Jean Baptiste Greuze ~ lecture 


March 5 , 1977 — Lecture by Edgar Munhall 


American Drawings and V/atercolors -- lectures 


April 2 , 1977 Lecture by Donelson Hoopes 

April 9, 1977 — Lectures by Donelson Hoopes and George Fitch 


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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PROGRAMS (Continued) 


Pecos Bill , The Clown and The Parking Meter 


The Parasites and Passinp; Shots 


3. Bay Area Playwrights Festival 

October 9, 1976 — The Meter Beggar and The String Gatherer 
October 10, 1976 
October l6, 1976 
October 17, 1976 
October 23, 1976 
October 2^, 1976 
October 30, 1976 — 

October 31, 1976 — 

November 6, 1976 — 

November 7, 1976 — 

November 13,1976 — " ” 

November 14,1976 — • ” ” 

November 10, 1976 — Special show of Passing Shots for Jxmior League 

4, Childrens’ Programs 

Young Audiences of the Bay Area, Inc . 

February 3, 1977 — The Pyramids 

February 12, 1977 — Oakland Ensemble Theater 

February 19, 1977 — Robert Murphy Street Dance Company 

February 26, 1977 v*- G, S. Sachdev’s Music of India 

March 3, 1977 — - Bay Area Brass Quintet 

March 12, 1977 — Magic Carpet Play Company 

March 19, 1977 — Acme Woodwind Quintet 

March 26, 1977 Silver String Macdenoia Band 

San Francisco Attic 'Theater 


April 2, 1977 
April 9, 1977 
April 16, 1977 
April 23, 1977 
April 30, 1977 
May 7, 1977 
Itay 14, 1977 
May 21, 1977 


"Alice Through the Looking Glass" 

"The Roar of the Grespaint, the Smell of the Crowd" 
"Peter Pan" 

"Alice Through the Looking Glass" 

"The Roar of the Greasepaint" 

"Peter Pan" 

"Alice Through the Looking Glass" 

"Peter Pan" 


Berkeley Stage Company 


May 1, 1977 — Poetry Playhouse 


3. Other Miscellaneous Programs 

Center Stage for Music - talented student concerts 

March 6, 1977 
April 17, 1977 
May 13, 1977 
June 12, 1977 


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DEP/^Tt4ENT OF PUBLIC PROC4PJUIS (Continued) 

5. Other MiGcellaneous Programs (Continued) 

Gid.tar Concert Series 

January 30, 1977 — Vincenzo Macaluso 

February 27, 1977 — Philip Rosheger 
March 27, 1977 — George Sakellariou 
Ax^ril 24, 1977 Pd chard Stover 

San Francisco Opera Piccola 


March 17, 1977 -- Hie. Boas? and Le Mari a la Porte 
March 19, 1977 — • ” ” 

March 26, 1977 — • '' 

Violin Recitals 


August 21, 1976 — Bruce Freifeld, violinist 
August 22, 1976 — Bruce Freifeld, violinist 

Orchestra Concert 


December 3, 1976 — Reno (Nevada) Clirmiber Orchestra 
Avant-Garde Theater 


April 1, 1977 


Vocal Recital 


June 6, 1977 — Vahan Toolajian, Bass 
Rock Opera 

May 20, 1977 ■— He Taro , a light opera by the Sufi Choir 
May 21, 1977 ” 

May 22, 1977 ” 

May 27 , 1977 

Ifey 28 , 1977 ” 

May 29 , 1977 " 

June 3, 1977 ” 

June 4, 1977 ” 

June 3, 1977 ” 

June 10,1977 " 

June 11,1977 ” 


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APPEI'fDIX V 


Board of Trustees - Delores C, Malone, Director 


Resig^iation Board President 


Ransom M, Cook 
Election Board President 

V/alter S, Nevmian 
Re-election of Trustees 


I-Irs. Edward T. Harrison 
Mrs, Robert A, Magowan 
lies, V/illiam Pe Roth 
Mr, Harold L, Zellerbach 
Mr, R, Gvnn FoUis 

Trustees Elected 


Dr, V/alter Horn 
Mr, John H, Jacobs 
Mr, John Lov/ell Jones 

Death of Trustee 


11-3-76 


11-3-76 


11-3-76 


11->76 

11-3-76 

6-9-77 


Mr, Charles de Young Thieriot 3-21-77 

Personnel Changes 

Marie S, Jensen retired . as Executive Secretary after l8 years service 
at the Museums, 6-30-76, She was replaced on 7-1-76 by Delores C, Malone, 
Royal A, Basich retired as Exhibition Designer after 30 years service at 
the Legion of Honor, 


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I, ACTIVITIES SUPPORTED V.'HOLLY OR IN PART BY THE MUSEU14 SOCIETY 
A, Exhibitions 


1* American Art; An Exliibition from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs, 

John D, Rockefeller 5rd; April 17 ~ August 15, 1976: de Young 

Museum. Initially reported in 1975-76 i^nntial Report. 

2. America Observed (Walter Evans photographs and Edward Hopper 
etchings): September 4 - October 24, 1976: Legion of Honor. 

3# As V/e Were, As V/e Are: A Century of San Francisco Life in Archi- 

tecture: October 9, 1976 •- January 30, 1977: de Young Museum. 

4, David Lance Goines: Posters 1968-1976: October 30, 1976 - 
January 9, 1977: Legion of Honor. 

5, five Centuries of Tapestry: November 20, 1976 - January 30, 1977: 
Legion of Honor. 

6, "The History of Jacob’’ Tapestries: November 20, 1976 - January 
30, 1977: Legion of Honor. 

7« American Master Drawings and Watercolors: Vtorics on Paper from 

Colonial Times to the Present; February 19 - April 17, 1977: 
Legion of Honor. 

8, The Flute and the Brush: February 26 - April 10, 1977: Legion of 
Honor, 

9* Jean-Baptiste Greuze 1725-l805: March 5 - May 1, 1977: Legion of 
Honor. 

10, Masterpieces of Primitive Art ; March 19 - Jime 19, 1977: 
de Young Museum, 

11, The Museimi Society and an outside donor provided funds for the 
reinstllation of the Museums* permanent collections of classical 
art from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome in a completely renovated 
gallery at the de Young Museum, 

B, Exhibition Programming 

1. In conjunction \fLth As V/e Were, As We Are , a public celebration 
on October 9, 1976, a film series, and 13 lectures/discussions/ 
tours were financed by gifts from several outside donors, with 
some funding assistance from the Society, 


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2. International Tapestry Symposium , held in conjunction v/ith the 
Tapestry e3diibitions at the Legion of Honor: November 20-21, 1976, 

Thirteen tapestry experts from the United States and abroad pre- 
sented papers on the art, science and history of tapestries, 

"Medium and Material": Mrs, C,M, Thurman (Art Institute of Chicago) 
and Dr, Harold Lundgren (Univ, of California, Davis), 

"Conservation and Design": Miss Nobuko Kajitani (Metropolitan 
Museum) and Mr, Mark Adams (San Francisco). 

"Tai^estries of the Late Middle Ages": Dr, L, Masschelein-ICLeiner 
(Institute Royal du Patriomine Artis tique, Brussels) and Mr, Larry 
Salmon (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston). 

"Tapestries of the l6th and 17th Centuries": M, Guy Delmarcel 
(MusSes Royaux d'Art et d*Histoire, Brussels) and Mme Madeleine 
Jarry (Mobilier National and Gobelins, Paris). 

"Tapestries of the 17th and l8th Centuries": M. Bertrand Jestaz 
(Musee du Louvre, Paris) and Miss Edith Standen (Metropolitan Mus,) 

3. In conjunction vd.th the Tapestry exhibitions, a series of 
musical programs was held in the Legion of Honor galleries on 
weekend afternoons from Nov, 20, 1976 through Jan, 23, 1977. 

In conjunction with Masterpieces of Primitive Art , a series of 
20 films examining primitive cultures in Africa, Oceania and the 
Americas was presented on Sunday afternoons at the de Young Museum. 

C, Performing Arts 

1, V/eekend Performing Arts, A contimiing series of v/eekend programs 
of music, dance, drama and poetry readings was presented on week- 
end afternoons at the de Yotmg and Legion of Ilonor. 

2, Summer Twilight Concerts . Three early evening concerts by the San 
Francisco Chamber Orchestra, with Edgar J, Braun conducting, v/ere 
held at the Legion of Honor on July 29 & Aug, 3? 1976 and May 29, 
1977. 

3, Museum Theater . Six plays by six local playi'/rights were produced 
in the Little Theater at the Legion of Honor during the Bay Area 
Playwrights Festival in October and November 1976. 

D, Lectures 

1, Edgar Munhall, Curator of the Frick Collection, New York, on 
"Greuze Anew: A Rediscovered l8th Century Artist": March 3j 1977. 

2, Donelson F, Hoopes, Visiting Curator, Dept, of Painting and 
Sculpture, on "The Watercolors of V/inslow Homer": April 2, 1977. 

3, Donelson F, Hoopes on "The Watercolors of John Singer Sargent": 
April 9, 1977. 


83 - 


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Publications 


America Observed; Edward Hopper/V/alker Evans , a catalogue compiled 
by Robert Flynn Johnson to accompany the exhibition of Edward 
Hopper etchings and photographs by V/alker Evans* 

2. Five Centuries of Tapestry from The Fine Arts Tluseums of San Fran- 

cisco by Anna G, Bennett, a catalogue to accompany the Tapestry 
exhibition. 

Members^ Events 


1* Champagne Evening at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 
honor of the exhibition The "VJild Beasts’*; Fauvism and Its 
Affinities: July 12, 1976/ ^-9 p*m, ^^s, Alan S. Robinson, Chairmai' 

2, Members* receptions in connection with the Tapestry exhibitions at 
the Legion of Honor: November 22 and 23j 1976, 6-9 p.m, ; Mrs. 
Joachim Bechtle and Mrs, John G, Bowes, Co-chairmen. 

3, Family Holiday Party for members and their children at the de Young 
Museum: December 12, 1976, 6-9 p*m.; Mrs, V/illiam V/aste and lirs, 
Richard Love of the Museum Society Auxiliary were Co-chairmen. 

4, Champagne Evenings in honor of the American Watercolor and Greuze 
exhibitions at the Legion of Honor: March 7 ^-nd 8, 1977* 6-9 p,m, : 
Mrs, John N, Callander and Mrs, Robert Patton, Co-chairmen, 

Special Events (non-member ) 

1, Reception and dinner to celebrate the opening of the Tapestry ex- 
hibitions at the Legion of Honor: November 19} 1976: reception, 

6-8 p.m,: dinner, 8 p.m. Reception Co-chairmen: Mrs. Joachim 
Bechtle and lirs, John G, Bowes: Dinner Chairman, Mrs, James K, 
McV/illiaras, 

2, Buffet dinner for Tapestry Symposium panelists at Mark Adams’ 
firehouse: November 21, 1976, 7 p.m,: W, Scott Martin, Chairman. 

3. Private reception in honor of the American Vfetercolor exhibition 
at the Legion of Honor: February 24, 1977} 5:30-7:30 p.m,: 
Co-chairmen: Mrs, V/, Robert Phillips and Mrs. James K. McWilliams. 
Co-sponsored by the Bay Area Graphic Arts Council. 

4. Dinner and reception for the Association of Art Museiim Directors, 
May 25 and 28, 1977} at the Legion of Honor and de Young Museum 
respectively. 


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H. Travel 


1, ’’ Splendours of the Orient /* October 17 - November l8, 1976, 

A tour through Japan, Korea, Thailand, Sri Lanka and Singapore, 
led by William D, Y, V/u, a member of the Museum Society Board. 

17 participants. 

2, East Coast Art Tour , October 15-25, 197<o, ivith visits to museums 
and private collections in Philadelphia, Baltimore and V/ashington, 
D,C., led by Ian McKibbin Itiite, 17 participants. 

3* "Splendours of Vienna and Eastern Europe. ” May 19 - June 13, 1977, 
a tour through Austria, Hungary, Romania, the TJ.S.S.R, and 
Czechoslovakia. 8 participants. 

EXPENDITURES ON BEHALF OF THE MUSEUMS 


Director’s 1976-77 Contingency Fund: ^27,000 


1976-77 appropriation for the Asian Art Museum: 1^16,000 

de Young Museum Art School: Scholarship program: ^j2,500 

Trip-out Truck: 13,000 

Art Apprenticeship program: 1,000 

Downtov/n Center exhibition: 1,000 

Downto\m Center workshops: 465 

Downtovm Center Paper show 

lecture: 150 

sU8",115 


Exhibitions; 1J2l4,827 
Education : 75 , 151 


Installation of American Galleries: Professional services 
of Ronald Egherman, Thomas 
Seligman, Donelson Hoopes and 
Stan Reifel: $32,110 

Supplies, etc.: 68,776 

aborts 


Plant care at de Yoimg Museum: $460 

Re-installation of French galleries at Legion; $l8,552 
New lighting, Galleries 15, 17, l8, 19 at Legion: $16,577 


Renovation, Galleries, A and B at de Young: $751 


Entertainment expenses for the Association of Art Museum Directors, 
May 25 and 28, 1977”. $4,821 


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The salaries of the follo\cing Fine Arts Musetims staff memhers were 
funded by the Society in 1976-77 i 

Joanne Backman, Administrative Assistant, 

James Baldocchi, Theater Manager, effective October 1, 1976. 

Kathleen Berrin, Assistant Curator, Dept, of Africa, Oceania and 
the Americas. 

Michael Cox, Exliibitions Manager, effective October 1, 1976. 

Renee Beller Dreyfus, Assistant Cinrator, Education and Interpretation, 
effective February l6, 1977* 

Edward T, Engle, Jr,, Publications Manager (part-time) 

Ron Rick, Graphic Designer, 


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APPENDIX VII 




REVENUE AND EXPENDITUPvE STATEMENT 

Museums Admission Fund 

July 1 , 1976 through June 30 , 1977 


Revenues: 


July 1976 

34,534.93 

August 

34,094.85 

September 

20,502.30 

25,694,70 

October 

November 

25,894.85 

December 

25,379.05 

January 1977 

33,918.08 

February 

19,263.11 

March 

23,904,71 

April 

23,296.50 

May 

21 , 046.25 

June 1977 

23,023.90 

Total Revenue for the period 

310,553,23 

Deduct: Actual expenditures (see schedule belov/) 

53 , 415.96 

Revenues in excess of expenditures 

257,137.27 

Deduct: Pursuant to Ordinance No. 488 - 75 > 30 % to 

the City and Coimty of San Francisco 

128,568,63 

Balance due to Museums (The Fine Arts Museioms 

of San Francisco Fund.) 

128,568,64 


Actual Expenditures for Fiscal Year 1976 - 1977 

Expenditures, per Controller's Statement, Jime 30 , 1977 


6. 621 0 116. 010. 000 - permanent salaries 35jl51.19 

6.621.112.010.000 - holiday pay 1,113.^7 

6.621.1204010.000 - temporary saiaries 1 , 249.80 

6.621.200.010.000 - contractual services 4 , 748,98 

6.621.300.010.000 - materials and supplies 850,94 

Mandatory Fringe Benefits, per Payrolls 

Social Security 1 , 660.27 

Retirement System 5 , 228.99 

Health Service 539.65 

Prior Year's Appropriation, Expenditures this year 

5.621.200.001.000 - contractual services 2 , 562.21 

5. 621 0 400 . 001 . 000 - equipment 330,46 


Actual expenditures for the period 33 j 415,96 


- 89 ~ 


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APPENDIX .VIII 




Grants Awarded for Fiscal Tear 1976-77 


Grants and Programs 

Period of Support 

Amount Av/arded 

R6O-2O-32 

Triumph of Hui^ianisra 

I'lEA: Museujn Program 

9/1/76-12/31/77 

^^ 20,130 

T- 70 - 20 - 70 .f 

/vmerican Galleries Installation 
Utilization of Collections 

NEA: Museum Program 

11/1/76-10/31/77 

30,000 

R 70 - 20-212 

Conservation Master Apprentice 
NEA: Museum Program 

Vl/77-3/31/78 

11,000 

R6O-2O-493 

De Young Art School 

Video Film Project 

I'lEA: Museum Program 

7/1/76-9/30/77 

10,110 

Grants Av/arded for Programs Beginning Prior to Fiscal Year 1976-77 

A 40 - 20-89 

French Drawings Catalogue 

NEA: Museum Program 

6A/74-I2/3I/77 

20,000 

765-0238 

French Drawings Catalogue 

Ford Foundation 

3/25/76-12/31/77 

19,460 

A 40 - 20-331 

Rodin Sculpture Catalogue 

NEA: Museum Program 

6A/74-I2/3I/77 

^ 20,000 

765-0234 

Rodin Sculpture Catalogue 

Ford Foundation 

3/25/76-I2AI/77 

19,923 

R 50 - 20 - 271 B 

3/1/76-12/31/76 

3,000 


Security Roll-dovm Doors 
IffiA: Museum Program 


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Grants and Programs 


Period of Support Amount Av/arded 




R30-20-93 

Flemish Paintings Catalogue 
NEA: Museum Program 

1/1/76-6/30/77 

i:520,000 

R60-20-371B 
de Young Renovation 

NEA| Museum Program 

1/1/76-6/30/77 

159,030 

Rockefeller Interns 

Rockefeller Foimdation 
de Young Art School 

1976-1978 

180,000 

Conservation Laboratory Equipment 

Cowell Foundation 

25,000 

Conservation Equipment 

Packard Foundation 


3,000 


Roral Funds ^^471 , 4l3 


Grants Av;arded Beginning After 

Fisccil Year 1976-77 


San Francisco Foundation 
Dovmtown Art Center 

7A/77-6/30/77 

23,000 

Bo thin Helping Fund 

Downtovm Art Center 


3,000 

Fleishhacker Foundation 
Dovmtoim Art Center 

NEA: Expansion Arts Program 
Do\^mtown Art Center 

7/1/77-6/30/77 

2,300 

3,000 

Skaggs Foundation 

Triumph of Humanism Exhibit 


3,000 

California Arts Council 
Playv/rights Festival 

1 / 1 / 78 - 12 / 31/78 

3,000 


Total Funds ^^5,300 
17 Active Grants Total F\mds 

S568,135 


- 91 - 




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Grants Pending 



Grants and Prograiiis 

Period of Support Requested 

Amount Requested 

Art of the Huichol fbchibit 
NEA: Museum Program 

10/1/77-6/30/78 

20,000 

French Paintings Catalogue 
NEA: Museum Program 

10/1/77-9/30/79 

30,000 

Conservation Apprentice 
Decorative Arts 

NEA: Museum Program 

4/1/78-3/31/79 

10,000 

Museum Education 
de Young /irts School 

ItEA: Museum Program 

7/1/77-9/30/78 

29,730 

Trip Out Trucks 
de Young Art School 

MEA: Museum Program 

7/1/77-6/30/78 

17,000 

Climate Control Renovation 
NEA: Museum Program 

1/1/78-12/31/79 

112,608 


Total $219,358 


- 92 - 



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THE FINE ARTS MUSEUMS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES 

FOR THE 


FISCAL YEAR 1977-1978 



i 


THE FINE ARTS MUSEUMS OF SAN FRANCISCO 


SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1977-1978 


What follows is a summary of activities of the Fine Arts Museiims of 
San Francisco for fiscal year 1977-1978. A more comprehensive review 
is forthcoming with the FAMSF Annual Report, which will be pubished 
in several months. 


Contents , Page 

Department of Africa, Oceania & Americas 1 

Department of Decorative Arts & Sculpture 2 

Textiles 2 

American Decorative Arts 3 

American Galleries 3 

Department of Paintings 3 

Achenbach Foundation 4 

Department of Exhibitions 5 

Registrars ' 5 

Library 5 

Publications 6 

l^ucation Division 6 

Public Programs 6 

Art School 7 

Docent Council 9 

Department of Interpretation 10 

Volunteer Council 10 

Administration 10 

Museum Society 11 



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Africa, Oceania & Americas 


The Department of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas focused its at- 
tention on three major areas: enriching its collections, presenting 
exhibitions, and publishing. 

A number of fine new pieces were acquired this year, many by Depart- 
ment Curator Thomas K. Seligman on the Museum Society Trip to Melanesia 
in the summer of 1977. A Washkuk female ancestor figure, two Tambanum 
Ancestral Masks, and five Mud Masks from New Guinea are amongst these 
recent acquisitions. Mr. Andy Williams donated his collection of fifty 
Navajo rugs and blankets, and the North American Indian collections 
further developed with fourteen Northwest Coast Indian Baskets, a 
beaded 0 j ibway Pouch, and a Northern style Portrait Mask actually carved 
in the gallery by artists Tony and Calvin Hunt. The African Collection 
also grew; a Dan Female Mask and a Beggar Figure were among many 
other highlights this year. 

Form and Freedom : Indian Art of the Northwest Coast (CPLH: March 25- 
May 29 , 1978) was the primary exhibition effort. Baskets, boxes, combs 
and masks were among the one hundred and two works of art dating from 
the late 18th century to 1930. The exhibition was organized by Rice 
University's Institute for the Arts, in cooperation with the Metro- 
politan Museum, and was drawn from the collections of the de Menil 
Family and the de Menil Family Foundation. Photographs, a film about 
the Northwest Coast Culture, carving demonstrations, and a lecture 
enhanced the exhibition. 

In early 1978 the African section of the Department's permanent gallery 
was entirely re-installed to accomodate the many recent gifts to the 
Museums. The Department's photography program, designed to document 
the cultures of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, continued with two 
exhibitions Photographs of Bopieo (de. Young: Nov. 11-Feb. 12) , and 
Photographs of Southwest Ethiopia (de Young: Feb. 12-May 14) .' Finally, 
a large portion of the Williams textiles were moved to the Art School's 
Downtown Center, and Mother Earth , a selection of large ceramic pots 
from the Museums' collection (April 1-July 7) was moved to the Downtown 
Center . 

The Department is now preparing a large exhibition of Huichol Indian 
Art to be on view in San Francisco from November 4th through March 4th, 
1979. Approximately one hundred and fifty objects were borrowed from 
Museums and private collections across the country. In connection with 
this exhibition the Museums are co-publishing a comprehensive catalogue 
of Huichol Art with Harry N. Abrams. The catalogue, which will be over 
two hundred pages, will feature illustrations of the exhibition objects 
and essays focusing on approaches to the art. 


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Finally, Gallery Interpretive Sheets, guiding the visitor through the 
AOA collections, were published, and the textile collections were 
thoroughly organized and carefully stored. 

Dept, of Decorative Arts and Sculpture 

Graeme Keith retired as Curator- in-Charge after nearly twenty years 
of invaluable service, and was succeeded by Michael Conforti, who 
arrived in November, 1977. At that time, the Department was in the 
midst of exhibitions which would consume its energies throughout the 
coming year. A stunning exhibition of Renaissance objects, organized 
by Mr. Keith and entitled The Triumph of Humanism (CPLH: Oct. 22- 
Jan. 8, 1977) featured two hundred and titty objects from the Renais- 
sance, and included programs of dance, literature, music, and lectures. 

A comprehensive catalogue accompanied the ejdiibition, documenting the 
objects and exploring the exhibition through scholarly essays. 

The Treasures of Early Irish Art (de Young: Feb. 21-May 21, 1978) was 
a landmark exhibition of seventy national treasures from the Republic 
of Ireland, and came to San Francisco after opening in New York. Legen- 
dary masterpieces such as the Book of Kells, Tara Brooch, and Brian’s 
Harp drew crowds totalling approximately 200,000, greater than the at- 
tendance at the Metropolotan Museum months earlier. 

The Department also organized a small exhibition of Continental Por- 
celain from the Permanent Collection and finished the year with English 
Silver irom the Untermyer Collection (CPLH: June 29-Aug. 20, 1978) . 

The staff is now working towards the massive exhibition from the German 
Democratic Republic, The Splendor of Dresden: Five Hundred Years of Art 
Collecting . which will fill the Legion in February, 1979, and The Trea- 
sures of Tutankhamun , coming to the de Young in June of 1979. 

Despite this demanding schedule of exhibitions, the Department managed 
to acquire a number of important works. An early 19th century Secre- 
taire and a large equestrian figure of Charles III of Spain from the 
Italian Baroque were notable additions. 

The Department of Decorative Arts and Sculpture encompasses furniture, 
sculpture, ceramics, and a wide variety of objects d* art ; within this 
broad spectrum are two important divisions: Textiles, under the cura- 
torship of Anna Bennett, and American Decorative Arts, under the direc- 
tion of Donald Stover. 

Textiles 


The Textiles Division conserves and presents the Museums' ever-expand- 
ing collection of tapestries, costumes and their accessories, rugs, 
and textile pieces. The emphasis in 1977-78 was on costumes: the Cura- 
tor, a conservator, and ten interns and volunteers began moving each 
piece to new storage facilities, carefully packing the collection, photo- 
graphing it (in order to minimize future needless handling of the ma- 
terial) , and cataloguing it. This painstaking task is still in progress. 


( 2 ) 




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The blossoming of interest in costumes also resulted in the exhibition 
A Century of Brides (de Young: July 22-Sept. 24, 1978) which presented 
twenty-one wedding gowns and twelve cases of accessories from 1826 
through the 1920s. This exhibition introduced the public to the Mu- 
seums' little known collections and is the first in a series of similar 
exhibitions . 

As the collections are becoming more widely known, increasing numbers 
of students are using the Museums as a study aid: college classes 
from as far away as Tennessee have visited the Textile laboratories 
for slide lectures on costumes, discussions, and selected samplingsof 
actual material. 

Meanwhile, a travelling version of Five Centuries of Tapestry , which 
gathered many of the Museums ' choice tapestries, was circulated to 
other museums across the country. 

American Decorative Arts 

American Decorative Arts is a new division within the Department, re- 
presenting the Museums' commitment to American Art. In its first year 
the division has begun the organization, evaluation, documentation, and 
expansion of the collection. Twelve new objects were acquired, includ- 
ing an important silver tankard by the patriot. and master silversmith 
Paul Revere. 

American Galleries 


The Museums ' commitment to American Art was reaffirmed with the opening 
on July 4th, 1977, of the American Galleries, a suite of eleven gal- 
leries which integrate American painting, sculpture, costumes, furni- 
ture, and decorative arts from the colonial period to the present. In 
January of 1978 came the announcement of the intention of Mr. and Mrs. 
John D. Rockefeller, 3rd to donate their exceptional collection of 
American Painting to the Fine Arts Museums. San Francisco is on its 
way to becoming one of the foremost centers of American Art in the na- 
tion. 

Department of Paintings 

The American Galleries occupied much of the attention of the Depart- 
ment of Paintings this year, along with the complete rehanging of the 
European paintings collection, excluding the French School. As a re- 
sult, five hundred works of art have found new homes throughout the Mu- 
seums . 


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In addition to the munificent Rockefeller bequest, the collections 
were enriched by a number of Italian works , including a seventeenth 
century masterpiece by Strozzi, Market Scene with Still Life . Also 
in the Italian School, Giovanni Battista Pittoni's Descent Trom the 
Cross , a gift from the Mildred Anna Williams Fund, brings to the Mu- 
seums our first representation of religious art in the eighteenth 
century. Other rare additions to the collections included The Story 
of Brutus and Portia , by Jacopo del Sellaio, and a superb landscape 
from the seventeenth century in France by Gaspard Dughet. 

Two major exhibitions were also sponsored: Russian and Soviet Paint- 
ings (de Young: Aug. 6-Oct.9, 1977) and In Celebration of Loie Fuller 
(CPLH: Dec. 10, 1977- March 26, 1978). The first exhibition featured 
one hundred and twenty-five works of Russian art from the twelfth cen- 
tury to the present; Loie Fuller combined paintings, drawings, sculp- 
ture, and costumes to honor the renowned tum-of-the-century dancer. 

Achenbach Foundation for the Graphic Arts 

The Achenbach Foundation, which serves as the Museums' Department of 
Prints and Drawings, houses the largest collection of graphics in the 
Western United States. In March of this year Fenton Kastner retired 
after thirteen and one-half years of conscientious service as Curator, 
and was honored in May of 1978 with an exhibition entitled A Tribute 
to Fenton Kastner (CPLH: May 15-July 31, 1978), which presented signi- 
ficant purchases made during his years as Curator-in-Charge . 

Under the direction of Robert Flynn Johnson, fourteen drawings and 
thirty-five prints were selected for purchase this year, including 
drawings by Hokusai and Toulouse Lautrec, and prints by Frankenthaler 
and many other masters • Much of the collection's growth sprang from 
the generosity of a number of donors, who presented forty-three draw- 
ings and two hundred and ninety prints . 

The Department was responsible for seventeen exhibitions throughout 
the year. Most exhibitions drew primarily upon the resources of the 
Foundation, and ranged from North European engravings to Indian minia- 
tures . 

The use of the Achenbach as a teaching resource for the community is 
a prime responsibility. Classes of art historians, artists, and grad- 
uate students have met with the staff for seminars and private viewings 
of the collections. 

The Graphic Arts Council doubled its membership this year under strong 
leadership and sponsored the Graphic Arts Council Members' Exhibition 
(January 19-March 5, 1978) during the winter. 


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Department of Exhibitions 

The Department of Exhibitions was involved in the planning, coordina- 
tion, and mounting of twenty-three exhibitions, with an additional 
five shows installed at the Downtown Center. Many of these are des- 
cribed in the individual departmental summaries. Two of these, Russian 
and Soviet Painting and Treasures of Early Irish Art were major inter- 
national exhibitions, absorbing much of the staff's energies and time. 

Two more international exhibitions. The Splendor of Dresden : Five 
Hundred Years of Art Collecting and Treasures of Tut ankhamun w ill be 
shown at the Legion of Honor and the de Young Museiim respectively, 
in the coming year. In preparation for these two major exhibits, both 
buildings are under construction with major capital improvements. New 
flooring, roofing, lighting, climate control, and moveable walls are 
being installed in the temporary exhibition galleries at the de Young. 

A similar climate control system is being installed at the Legion. 

These improvements will not only accomodate these particular exhibi- 
tions, but will also enhance the Museums' ability to attract future shows. 

Registrars 

The Registrars act as custodians of all art objects owned and borrowed 
by the Museums. Each piece must be documented, and its physical, legal, 
and insurance protection assured. The permanent collection alone num- 
bers nearly sixty thousand works, while the volume of temporary objects 
processed in 1977-78 numbered around six thousand. 

Previously the Registrar at- each building functioned independently; 
this year steps were made to consolidate the two Registrars into a 
single team. The method of record-keeping was made uniform, and a cen- 
tralized system for ordering photographs was established. The Registrars 
also worked together in de-accessioning a large group of furniture. 

A new policy was instituted which periodically reassigned each staff 
from one Museum to the other, so that each Registrar will be familiar 
with both operations . The result is that they will be able to concen- 
trate efforts at whichever building is busier, such as during the up- 
coming large international exhibitions. An Assistant Registrar posi- 
tion was added by the Museum Society to facilitate this interchange. 

We note with regret and respect the passing of Frederick Snowden who 
served ably for six years and nine months as Registrar of the de Young 
Museum. 

Library 

The Library is housed in the de Young Museum and contains twenty 
thousand volumes, plus numerous sales and auction catalogues and bound 
periodicals . 


( 5 ) 




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It is available to the public by appointment, and the library staff 
answers hundreds of reference questions by telephone and mail each 
year. In the first half of 1978, two professional librarians managed 
the facility. This was later reorganized to consist of one librarian, 
assisted by three part-time volunteers. A total of eight hundred 
and eleven books were added to the collection. Nearly sixty periodi- 
cals are currently received. Moreover, an exchange program of museum 
catalogues sent nearly two hundred copies to participating museums 
and libraries. 

Publications 


The Publications Department, funded by the Museum Society, is respon- 
sible for all aspects of the Museums' publishing program, from com- 
pletion of the manuscript through the bound book and its distribution. 
This year has seen the completion of three new volumes: The Triumph 
of Humanism in October of 1977; Rodin's Sculpture and Four Centuries 
of French Drawings in March of 1978 . 

A number of projects are nearing completion: Art of the Huichol is 
on schedule for completion in September of 19781 The Arts of tTie 
Tapestry Symposium , which will be completed in fall of 1978, will be 
a useful companion piece to Five Centuries of Tapestry (published in 
November 1976) . The Fine Arts Museums are also collaborating with 
Apollo Magazine to produce two issues of the magazine devoted to FAMSF. 
This publication is scheduled for early 1979. 

Three scheduled projects have been changed: French Paintings has been 
postponed for a year; A Tribute to Walter Heil is undergoing a change 
of format; and Flemish Paintings will become part of a larger catalogue 
of European paintings in the collections. 

Education Division 


Public Programs, the de Young Museum Art School, Docents, Volunteer 
Council, and the Department of Interpretation all fall under the 
Education Division. Each group's activities are reviewed here separately. 

Public Programs 

The Department of Public Programs provided educational support, 
enhancement, and amplification of the exhibition program for the 
Museums. This was accomplished through lectures, demonstrations, and 
concerts which compliment the visual arts. The attendance for events 
produced soared to over thirty-four thousand in 1977-1978. 


( 6 ) 


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Over one thousand people attended a three day symposium on Early 
Irish Art and Culture. Similar programs surrounded Russian and Soviet 
Painting and The Triumph of Humanism , and a dance exhibition accompanied 
In Celebration of Loie Fuller . 

Relationships with Bay Area performing groups were renewed and expanded 
in 1978. For the second season the Fine Arts Museums worked together 
with the Recreation and Park Department and the San Francisco Guitar 
Society to produce a series of concerts in the Museums' theatre and 
auditorium. The San Francisco Attic Theater worked once again with the 
Museums, this time to produce three separate runs of several different 
productions. The San Francisco Chamber Orchestra once again drew 

overflow crowds and critical acclaim for its Twilight Concerts series , 
presented in the Little Theater of the Legion. A new fall/winter series, 
"Sunday Strings" grew from this success, and presented recitals by 
orchestra members on Sunday afternoons. 

The Little Theater was also the site for the Second Bay Area Playwrights 
Festival in April and May of 1978. Growing from the first Festival in 
1976 , it presented world premieres of five plays by regional and national 
authors . 

Finally, the fifty-year tradition of organ concerts each Saturday and 
SLinday at the Legion continued under the able musicianship of organists 
Ludwig Altman and Newton Pashley. 

Art School 

Another major aspect of the Education Division is the de Young Museum 
Art School, which conducts four programs: 1) The Museum Art School 
housed in the de Young, 2) the Trip-Out Trucks, 3) The Downtown Center, 
and 4) the Internship Program. 

1. THE DE YOUNG MUSEUM ART SCHOOL is committed to providing low-cost 
classes taught by professional artists to Bay Area residents. Over 
one hundred classes, special workshops, and art-related field trips 
are offered in four quarter semesters. The School is a non-profit 
corporation and is entirely supported by students' fees. 


Enrollment figures for 1977-1978 
Summer 1977: weekly enrollment 
(10 wk. session) 

were : 

909 

Community and 
School Groups 
30 

Fall 1977 : weekly enrollment 
(12 wk session) 

962 

80 

Winter 1978: weekly enrollment 
(12 wk session) 

895 

120 

Spring 1978: weekly enrollment 
(11 wk. session) 

954 

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In addition to the regular class program, a summer intern program for 
teenagers, funded by the NEA Expansion Arts Program, allowed eight teen- 
agers to assist with childrens' classes and to serve as apprentices 
to teachers at the Art School. 

2. THE TRIP-OUT TRUCKS visit school classrooms four times each year 
in an effort to integrate art into the school curriculum (through 
studio-art classes, lectures, and demonstrations) and to initiate the 
teacher to using the Museums as an educational resource. This year the 
Trip-Out-Trucks visited one hundred and one schools, or eight hundred 
and eight classrooms, which totalled twenty-eight thousand, two hun- 
dred and forty participating students. Also, eight childcare centers 
and four community centers (translating to eleven hundred and sixty 
children total) were visited. The trucks also visited nine special 
events around San Francisco, and in so doing came in contact with nearly 
fifteen thousand people. 

Funding for 1977-1978 was as follows: 


City & County of SF $ 500.00 
CETA salaries, SF 32,000.00 
Museum Society 15 , 000 . 00 


TOTAL $47,500.00 


3. THE DOWNTOWN CENTER, established in 1976, is a branch gallery of 
the Museums located in the downtown business district. During the 
year the Center held six major exhibitions with supporting programs 
directed towards artists, school grounds, and importantly, the business 
community. An estimated forty-eight thousand people visited these 
exhibitions; nine thousand, eight hundred and ninety participated in 
lectures and demonstrations, and an additional eighteen thousand 
children visited the Center for special tours and programs. The Center 
is open five days a week, Tuesday through Saturday, 11 am to 6 pm. , 
and is moving from 651 Howard Street to more convenient quarters at 
Three Embarcadero Center. 


Funding for 1977-1978 was as follows: 

Operating Costs and Exhibitions: 

Museum Foundation 

$16,000 

Museum Society 

10,000 

SF Foundation 

25,000 

Fleishhacker Foundation 

2,500 

Bothin Helping Fund 

5,000 

Lurie Foundation 

5,000 

Special Education & School Programs : 

NEA 

8,000 

TOTAL 

$71,500 


( 8 ) 





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4. THE MUSEUM INTERNSHIP PROGRAM selected six fellows from the 
Western United States to work and study at the Museums. Funded by 
the NEA and the Rockefeller Foundation, the program assists the Mu- 
seums in achieving national visibility for its education programs, 
and helps other museums initiate programs for their communities. 

In the summer and fall of 1977, and spring of 1978, the following 
people were selected: Kathy Zimmerer, Israel Alcantar, William 
Sandoval, Randy Holladay, John Sierra, and Michael Milligan. 

Docent Council 


A Docent is a selected and trained volunteer, who conducts tours of the 
Museums' permanent collections and special exhibitions. Aside from 
the regular series of tours in the Africa, Oceania and Americas and 
Western Areas, the Docents conduct a School Program and tours for the 
deaf and the visually handicapped. The Docents are also active in the 
Asian Art Museum. Of the three hundred and nine active Docents, thirty- 
four successfully completed their qualifications this past year for the 
Africa, Oceania and Americas galleries, and thirty-one for the Western 
Areas . 

Statistics for tours and attendance for 1977-1978: 


Western Collections Tours Given Visitors 

General, American 

& Special • 1,655 36,084 

School 510 4,278 

2TT65 40 ;3'6'(T 

Africa, Oceania & Americas 

General & Special 489 4,663 

School 277 1,242 

5,905 


(Each of these figures represents a substantial increase over 
the 1976-1977 statistics) . 

The Deaf Program has also been widely attended, with a total of sixty- 
five tours given to one thousand and fifty-six visitors in both the AAM 
and the Fine Arts Museums ; the Visually Handicapped Program conducted 
fifty-three tours to one thousand, five hundred and thirty-eight visi- 
tors . 


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Department of Interpretation 

The Docent Tours are one of the responsibilities of the Department of 
Interpretation, which develops labels, wall panels, brochures , audio- 
visual presentations and other means of enhancing the visitor's museum 
experience. Curriculum pamphlets and teachers' workshops have been 
produced, self-guided tours developed, and gallery sheets prepared. 

With the Museums' growing concern for the special needs of disabled vi- 
sitors, several programs were offered and others are being planned for 
the coming year. The Department designed an exhibition of photographs 
of the late nineteenth century deaf photographer Theophilus Hope d' 
Estrella, accompanied by a brochure about the artist, and printed by 
the students of the California School for the Deaf. 

Volunteer Council 


Volunteers are an important ingredient in the successful implementa- 
tion of the Museums' many programs. For special exhibitions they 
served as membership information specialists, sold tickets, catalogues, 
and posters, and helped to host members' receptions. Throughout the 
year volunteers provided assistance to Museum staff, worked in the 
bookshop and information desks , and performed a variety of valuable 
services. This year two hundred and sixty-six volunteers contributed 
over thirty-five thousand hours of their time. At current City pay 
rates, this contribution represents a minimum of $215,000 in services 
to the public. Two new programs were begun: Museum Surveillance at 
the Legion side door and Information Volunteers in the galleries of 
the de Young. 

Administration 


The Museums experienced a 197o increase in attendance over the last 
fiscal year, with 616,000 visitors to the de Young building and 
187,466 to the Legion of Honor, for a total of 803,566. This repre- 
sents a partial recovery toward the 1,000,000 annual level attained 
before admission fees were instituted in 1975, when the Museums suf- 
fered a 37% drop in attendance. Total admission revenue collected 
for 1977-1978 was $358,461. 

Plans for access ramps for the handicapped and for installation of 
heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems at both buildings 
were developed in preparation for the two international exhibitions 
in 1979. (see page 5). 

The Museums have added several administrative and curatorial staff 
members with temporary private funding to handle logistics and plan- 
ning for these exhibitions. On the permanent staff there is a lack 
of clerical support and security personnel, which becomes more criti- 
cal each year. The permanent guard force of thirty-three is augmented 
by nineteen CETA guards ; five CETA clerical workers aided the permanent 
clerical staff of four. 


( 10 ) 



During the fiscal year 1977-78, the Fine Arts Museums Foundation 
applied for and received the following grants from NEA: 

$ 20,000 for the exhibition Art of the Huichol 

20.000 for a catalogue of the French paintings collection. 

10.000 for support of a master apprentice intern in decora- 
tive arts conservation. 

5,000 for purchase of works of a living American artist 
for the Achenbach Foundation. 

The Fine Arts Museums Foundation also received grants from the 
following agencies : 

$ 25,000 from the San Francisco Foundation. 

10.000 from the Hears t Foundation. 

150,000 from the Irwin Charity Foundation. 

5,000 from the California Arts Council. 

50.000 from the Merrill Trust. 

The Foundation also applied for an NEA Challenge Grant of $1,000,000, 
pending decision in October 1978. 

Museum Society 

The Museum Society serves as the membership organization for the Mu- 
seioms. It maintains a paid membership of 30,904, and supported, in 
whole or in part, a variety -of Museum activities in 1977-1978: 


Activities Quantity 


Exhibitions 8 
Exhibition programs 7 
Performing arts series 6 
Lecture series 2 
Publications 3 
Special events 8 
Travel tours 5 
FAMSF staff salaries 12 


The Museum Society also maintains an auxiliary in San Francisco with 
ninety-four active members and forty-one sustaining members. This 
group sponsored the Treasure Hunt Auction in March, which netted 
$176,869 for the Museums, and co-sponsored several other events. Three 
suburban auxiliaries were maintained in Belvedere-Tiburon , Hillsborough, 
and Ross. 


( 11 ) 










The Graphic Arts Council (see page 5) sponsored an exhibition, lecture 
series, and receptions, and purchased an eighteenth century Indian 
miniature for the Achenbach Foundation. 

The Museum Society is also responsible for the Volunteer Council, serves 
as the financial guarantor of the Docent Council, and sponsors the two 
Museum bookshops along with the Salvage Shop in San Francisco. Special 
shops were operated for The Triumph of Humanism and Treasures of Early 
Irish Art , and the Society contracted the catering of Museum cafeterias. 

The following is a breakdown of Museum Society expenditures on behalf 
of the FAMSF: 

1 . Exhibitions 


Tutankhamun 

Dresden 

Annual Exhibitions 


$ 97,569 

16,227 
401,004 


2 . Education 


Programs 

Lectures 

Irish Art Symposium 
Other 


$ 47,646 


8,520 

16,596 

18,260 


3 . de Young Museum Art School : 


Scholarship Program 
Trip-out trucks 
Art Apprentice Program 
Downtown Center 
Community Programs 


$ 2,500 


15.000 

1,000 

10.000 

11,165 


4. Gallery Re-Installation 


Permanent Collection 
American Galleries 


$ 41,126 

26,180 


5 . Administration Costs 


FAM Contingency fund 
Indirect Costs & equipment 
Private receptions 
Museum staff 
Publications 


$ 25,500 


11,619 

4,509 

116,422 

72,746 


( 12 ) 









THE FINE ARTS MUSEUMS OF SAN FRANCISOD 
SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES 
FOR THE 

FISCAL YEAR 1978-1979 


DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

NOV 2 0 1979 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 


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THE FINE ARTS MUSEUMS OF SAN FRANCISCO 


SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1978-79 

What follows is a sunmary of activities of The Fine Arts Moseums of San 
Francisco for fiscal year 1978-79. A more conprehensive review is forth- 
coming with the FAMSF Annual Report, \^hich will be published in several 
months. 

Contents Page 


Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas 1 

Department of Decorative Arts and Sculpture 2 

Textiles 2 

American Galleries , 3 

Department of Paintings 3 

Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts 5 

Department of Exhibitions 6 

Registration 6 

Library 7 

Publications 7 

Public Programs 8 

Art School ; 8 

Docent Council 10 

Interpretation 11 

Volunteer Council 11 

Administration 12 

Miseum Society 13 


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Africa, Oceania and the Americas 


The Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas had a very active and pro- 
ductive ye^ in the areas of collections , exhibitions , publications , related 
projects and future planning. 

In the area of collections and acquisitions, the planning, legal work and ne- 
gotiations got under way for a substantial donation of wall paintings from 
Mexico. This involved cataloging and uncrating, photographing, storing and 
researching the collection with aid from outside consultants . ^ Iirportant 
acquisitions for the Africa, Oceanic and Pre-Columbian collections continued 
as did a steacfy stream of donations frcm Bay Area collectors. A complete con- 
servation report and assessment was performed on the City's collections, both 
those in storage and on permanent display. 

Exhibitions included "The Art of Being Hiiichol", a major e^diibition of over 
200 objects \diich was originated by tdie Museums and traveled to Chicago and 
New York after its initial showing in San Francisco; "Mother Earth: A Sele- 
ction of Ceramic Containers From the Permanent Collections"; "Scrimshaw": 
"Photographs of Southern Ethiopia"; "Photographs of Micronesia"; and a display 
of Navajo blankets frcm the Museums collection. Plans for a major reinstallation 
of the permanent collectico in the Gallery of Africa, Oceania and the Americas 
were also instituted. 

A major publication was produced by The Fine Arts Museums and co-piiblished with 
Harry N. Abrams Inc. : Art of Huichol Indians (200 pp. ,over 100 b/w photographs 
and 40 colorplates) . Forthccming articles on "Maori Art and Artistry", empha- 
sizing the finest Maori pieces in the City's collections, and an article on 
Islam and our African Tribal Mask were written for Apollo magazine. "The Art of 
Being Huichol", an article explaining the development o£ the exhibition, was 
written for Natural His to:^ Ifagazine . The Fine Arts Miseums were also repre- 
sented at the annual meeting of the American- Association of Museums with a paper 
presented on this exhibition. 

Other projects completed this year were a docent training series on the art of 
Oceania, reorganization of the storage areas and registration procedures, partic- 
ipation in the Oakland Museum Wilcomb Grant Project, as well as participation 
in a special project involving San Francisco Unified Schools and objects the 
Museums have placed on long term loan for use in study kits in elementary schools. 
Three major grants were written by the department and submitted to federal agencies. 
Proposals included : AOA Conservator (IIB) , Aesthetics of Power : Secret Societies 
on the Western Guinea Coast of Africa (NEH) vdiich was funded, and Teotihuacan 
Morals Conservation Planning Grant (NEA) . 

The year closed with plans proceeding on five public exhibitions and active 
reinstallation of a major portion of the City's collections and educational 
presentations in the permanent gallery of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, the 
Introductory Gallery and Gallery H. 


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Decorative Arts and Sculpture 


The past year has been one of tremendous activity for this department. In 
addition to 'working and continuing research on the permanent collection, we 
have also devoted much time and energy to the two major exhibitions of this 
year, "The Splendor of Dresden" (CPLH February - llay 31, 1979) and "The 
Treasures of Tutankhaniun" (de Young May 31 - SeptGE±)er 30, 1979). In pre- 
paring for 'Dresden", the CPLH had to be entirely de- installed and redesigned, 
with its collection going either into storage or on loan to other museums. 

Now that "Dresden" is over, we are in the process of reinstalling the Legion, 
an exciting but difficult project. In conjunction with "Dresden", the depart- 
ment organized a successful weekend seminar. The ''Tutankhamun'' e^^bition 
also necessitated the de-installation of part of the de Young, and we are 
currently preparing for reinstallation there as well as at the Legion. These 
two major shows precluded any other large in-house exhibitions; however, the 
Textile Department did organize several smaller ones which are mentioned 
below. 

During this hectic period, the department continued to make inportant acqui- 
sitions such as George I brass inlaid majogany side table by the noted English 
cabinetmaker, John Chamon, a Chinese export lacquer side chair of the Queen 
Anne period, an early eighteenth-century Italian altar frontal embroidered in 
gold, and a nineteenth-century terra-cotta bust of Diane by Flaguiere. We also 
received several gifts from Mrs. Dorothy Spreckles Muam, including a French 
Enpire mahogany and gilt bronze side board, c. 1810, a Paris porcelain orni- 
thological dessert service, c. 1820, and a pair of Meissen vases, c. 1750. 

The above activities and the necessary research involved, combined with the 
day-to-day dealings with the public and with other museums, have made this a 
very busy year in the department. 


Textiles 


This year marked the retirement of Anna Bennett as full-time Curator of 
Textiles. As a result of the years of dedicated work put in by Mrs. Bennett 
and her husband Ralph, the department has emerged as one of the finest in the 
country. Mrs. Bennett is continuing to work in the department on an exhibition 
and catalog of its eighteenth- century European fans. During the year, the de- 
partment presented several shows: "A Century of Brides" and "Victorian Acces- 
sories" (de Young, July 22 - September 24, 1978); "Persian Tribal Rugs Frcm the 
Collection of H. McCoy- Jones" (de Young, June 1 - Septorber 30, 1979) and 
"Tapestries: 15th - 20th Centuries" (Transamerica I^ramid, July 25 - September 
10, 1979). 

The department also made several loans for exhibitions in Utah and Virginia. 

The permanent collection continues to expand with various gifts frcm Mrs . 

Leslie Roos, Mrs. D.L. Wemple, and Mrs. A.F. Jostes. As with the other de- 
partments in the museim, the textile department is very involved with the re- 
installation of the Legion and in the past year, has been working on the con- 
servation of many of the Mjseums' tapestries and tapes try- covered chairs. 


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Wit±i its new storage facilities and large volunteer conservation staff, the 
department is looking forward to another year of expansion and development. 


American Galleries 


Ihe American Galleries, now entering their third year, have become a center 
for the study and enjoyment of American art. In addition to a large general 
visitation, the galleries are increasingly being used by classes and student 
groups from the Bay Area. These activities are sij^jplemented by gallery talks 
lectures and regularly scheduled Docent tours. 

The tenporary closing of the American Galleries, necessitated by construction 
in adjacent areas, provided the opportunity for a major reinstallation of the 
galleries. This reinstallation includes works not previously exhibited and 
recent acquisitions to the collection, including a selection of works of art 
from the bequest of Mr. John D. Rockefeller 3rd. 


Department of Paintings 

Rockefeller Bequest 

Through thought and action the late John D. Rockefeller 3rd manifested his 
desire to serve his fellow man. His benefactions towards the study of world 
population growth and the . understanding of Asian cultures will long have an 
impact on the world. Of imnediate inportance to us is the collection of 
American art vdiich had been premised to San Francisco just months before his 
tragic death and which his family presented to the Miseums. Long acknowledged 
as the finest private collection of American art, this magnificent gift brings 
San Francisco to the forefront as a center for the study of our national artistic 
heritage. The gift augments the permanent collection with the work of forty- 
three artists \dio previously had been unrepresented. At the same time, the works 
of artists such as Eastman Johnson and Albert Bierstadt can now be studied in 
depth through multiple examples . One nust also note the unusually high concen- 
tration and quality of early American portraiture, outstanding contributions 
in the areas of tronpe l*oeil painting, and individual masterpieces by artists 
such as Bingh^, Anshutz, and Grant Wood. Mr. Rockefeller's challenge to us to 
form a significant center for the study of American art is one that we will 
meet with enthusiasm in the ceming years . 

Acquisitions 

Althou^ few in number - in part reflecting the depletion of funds in the Mildred 
Anna Williams Trust - acquisitions have been of the greatest importance. The 
opportunity to acquire a rare and beautiful marriage salver, Diana and Acteon; 
Jj^tice , was realized by the San Francisco Foundation, which presented this 
Florentine double-sided panel (ca. 1400) to the Roscoe and Margaret Oakes Col- 
lection. Possibly by the Lazzaroni Master, an anonymous artist working in the 
circle of Lorenzo di Nicolo Gerini, it is among the earliest and best preserved 
salvers known today. Funds remaining in the Mildred Anna Williams Trust were 
used to purchase the Jiiseums' most important French portrait, a masterpiece by 


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Baron Gerard, La Cantesse de ^brel-Vinde and her Daughter Claire . Standing 
two meters high, this work had been exhibited in the Salon of 1798 and had 
remained with descendants of the sitter until coming to San Francisco. Of 
equal iiipoitance to the French collections is the acquisition of George 
Seurat's The Eiffel Tower . In its innovative technique and modem subject 
matter, this work represents the apogee of Seurat's brief career. Signif- 
icant gifts of landscape paintings joined the collections this year. A canvas 
by Thomas Barker of Bath, a gift of Mrs. Alfred Ehrman, extends our under- 
standing of late eighteenth-century English art. A work by Sanford Gifford 
from Mr. and Lfrs. Will Richeson, Jr. adds to the Auierican Galleries a major 
luminous painting. Harry William and Diane Vernon Hind's gift of two paintings, 
one by Ernest Lawson and another by Albert Bierstadt, enhanced our growing 
collection in these respective areas. For their continuing support and loans 
of paintings, Peter and Jacqueline Hoefer, R. Lockwood Tower, Dr. Joseph Shaw, Mrs. 
Jacob Kaplan, and Dr. William P. Jordan and two anonymous lenders receive our 
warmest thanks. 

Exhibitions and Loans 

In preparation for "The Treasures of Tutankhamun'', the American paintings were 
relocated on several occasions to insure their safety while the adjacent galleries 
were renovated. Of greater inportance to the department was the preparation for 
"The Splendor of Dresden". Since the French collections would not be available 
during most of this report period, forty-five of our best paintings traveled to 
Denver, New York, and Minneapolis with twenty- two drawings in the exhibition 
"Ilasterpieces of French Art". Individual loans included our Le Nain Pedants 
Before Their House to Paris for the major retrospective on the Le Nain family, 
and Sargent's A Bottle of Claret and Whitsler's The Gold Scab to inportant 
exhibitions . 

Conservation 

Iftider the supervision of Mrs. Teri Oikawa-Picante , our French paintings were 
examined and prepared for traveling. At the same time, full attention was given 
to the spectacular loans from Dresden. Work proceeded on the permanent collections 
with major attention being given to our two inportant paintings by Boucher, now 
returned to their original format; Largilliere's Portrait of the Marquis de 
t^ntespan , David's Portrait of the Baroness Meuniir , and The Flagellation o^f 
Christ by the Master of Kappenberg. 

Staff and Research 

The departmental files were reorganized by Marie Luise Huntington, Northern 
European; Dorothy Kenper, English and American; Mary Small, Italian and Spanish; 
Marion C. Stewart, French. With this inproved efficiency, information and docu- 
mentation were made more readily available for the special numbers of Apollo 
magazine devoted to the Mjseums' as well as for the continuing work on the 
European paintings cataloges. 

At the close of this report period we still have no information concerning the 
Christmas eve theft of Rembrandt's Portrait of a Rabbi , Delorme's Interior of 
the St. Lawrence Church , van der Velde's Harbor Scene or van der Neer's Moonlight 
Scene. 


( 4 ) 



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Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts 


IMs year t±ie Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts' normal exhibition pro- 
gram, with'-new exhibitions scheduled every two or three months, was severely 
curtailed because of the Museums' comnitiiient to "Treasures of Tutanhkamum" 
and "The Splendor of Dresden" exhibitions. Two exhibitions, the annual "Re- 
cent Acquisitions" and "French 19th Century Drawings from the Permanent Col- 
lection", were abruptly terminated viien an unforeseen emergency in the reno- 
vation of the building closed the Legion more than a month ahead of schedule. 
However, during the Dresden e>diibition the department organized two exhibitions 
frcm the permanent collection designed to it: "European Drawings 1570-1800" 
and "German Expressionist Prints and Drawings". At the de Young fLiseum, the 
Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts was responsible for several small print 
exhibitions: "Italian Renaissance Prints" and "Dutch I^Iamerist Prints" and, in 
the American Galleries, "J. Alden Weir" and "Wbodengravings After Winslow Homer". 
"Still Life: 20th Century American Prints, Drawings and Watercolors Frcm the 
Achenbach Fomdation for Graphic Arts" was organized in May for the Downtown 
Center. In the next two years, the Western Association of Art Museums will 
circulate to eight institutions an exhibit of 61 prints entitled "Artists' 
Portraits and Self Portraits". These works were selected from two larger 
exhibitions on the same subject drawn frcm the permanent collection and ex- 
hibited in the gallery at the Legion of Honor in 1976 and 1977. 

Despite the curtailment of exhibitions, the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic 
Arts has continued to be a teaching resource for classes, individual scholars, 
and other visitors at nearly the usual rate. Loans to other institutions have, 
if anything, increased over the past year. 

Gifts and bequests of prints, drawings and posters have continued at a remark- 
able rate, supplementing and enriching an acquisition program that continues to 
strengthen the quality and diversity of the collection. A relatively quiet ex- 
hibition schedule has allowed more time to research, catalog and mat these fine 
acquisitions . 

The dramatic rise of interest in the Graphic Arts Council has been of the utmost 
inportance. A large nuriber of the greatly increased membership have attended a 
variety of programs, such as lectures, round table discussions, and field trips. 
Ihe Council has also presented several important works to the collection. The 
board of the Graphic Arts Council, with Ifrs. Richard Lockwood Tower as its hard- 
working and conscientious chairman, has provided both support and enthusiasm. 

The library remains the responsibility of Brenda Palley and Martha McDaniel 
under Jane Nelson's direction. Without the loyalty and efficiency of Cheryl 
Faus and conservation technician Niccolo Caldararo, the department would not 
function. In December, 1978 Maxine Ross ton was promoted to assistant curator. 
When Aimee Troyen, formerly with the Yale Center for British Art, arrived in 
June 1979, to assume her duties as assistant curator, the department was 
brought to full strength for the first time since Fenton Kastner's retirement 
in March, 1978. 


( 5 ) 


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Department of Exhibitions 

The Department of Exhibitions was responsible for the planning, coordinating 
and mountii^ of eleven exhibitions, and two major reinstallations of the per- 
manent collection. TWo of the temporary exhibitions, "The Splendor of Dresden: 
Five Centuries of Art Collecting" and "The Treasures of Tutankhamun" , were among 
the most inportant ever to be shewn in the United States. 

In late 1978, the California Palace of the Legion of Honor was completely cleared 
of the permanent collection to accomnodate the installation of a gallery climate 
control system for "The Splendor of Dresden". Over seven hundred objects were 
displayed from February 24 to June 3, 1979, setting a record for the largest 
traveling esdiibition in this country, attracting a total attendance of 544,516. 
The permanent collection will be reinstalled during the autum of 1979 and will 
reflect a new interpretation of the Miseums' collections. 

At the M.H. de Young Memorial Hiseim, approximately 10,000 square feet of tem- 
porary exhibition gallery space were renovated, and a climate control system 
was installed to acccoinodate "The Treasures of Tutankhamun" extiibition. On 
display from June 1 to September 30 , 1979 , it drew a record-breaking attendance 
of approximately 1,367,000, the largest ever for such an event in San Francisco. 

Both of these exhibitions focused national attention on The Fine Arts Miseums of 
San Francisco, causing mertbership in the Miseum Society to reach 78,000, the 
largest such membership in the Ihited States. The capital improvements required 
for each show (climate control systems , equipment purchase , renovated galleries , 
new roofing and lifting) will have future benefits for preserving the permanent 
collection and will also increase the Museums' ability to attract exhibitions of 
equal stature in the future. 


Registration 

A principal function of the Registration Department is to record and supply in- 
formation about the over 60,000 works of art in the Museums' custody, as well as an 
increasing volume of tenpDrary loans and object movements. This function en- 
tails preparing complete documentation of every object along with maintaining 
location control. The Registrars are also responsible for scheduling and super- 
vising physical art object movement. 

While registration duties used to be assigned according to building, the Regis- 
trars have found that a more logical division of labor is to divide responsibili- 
ties between permanent collection and temporary exhibitions. Cceprehensive 
catalog information for the Moseums ' permanent collection is now housed at the 
M.H. de Young Ifemorial Fiiseum Tdiile the California Palace of the Legion of Honor's 
registration office holds comprehensive exhibition files for past and current 
exhibitions. These reorganized records should be physically integrated into one 
library system for staff and public information as soon as possible. Estimates 
for microfilm and cenputerization have been obtained, and the department awaits 
funding for this most urgent need. 


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The two major ejdiibitions "The Splendor of Dresden" and "The Treasures of 
Tutankhamun" were the main focus of the Registrars, for they involved the 
transportation and registration of almost one thousand objects loaned to 
the liiseums. The space they required displaced the permanent collection 
so that adequate storage accomiodations became a prime concern. 

In addition, The Fine Arts Museums organized and circulated two exhibitions: 
"Masterpieces of French Art" and "The Art of Being Huichol". The regis- 
tration responsibilities involved with these exhibitions were also h^dled 
by the Registration Department. In addition, the department supervised the 
transfer of the John D, Rockefeller 3rd gift of 109 American paintings from 
New York to San Francisco. 


Library 

Ihe library of The Fine Arts Miseiins is located in the M.H. de Young Memorial 
Museim. It contains twenty thousand volumes, plus numerous sales and auction 
catalogs and hundreds of bound periodicals. 

The library staff consists of one full-time librarian and four part-time 
volunteers . 

Last year the librarian answered over 500 reference questions frcoi the public, 
by telephone and by letter. In 1978-79 300 volumes were purchased for the 
Library, and 363 volumes were received as gifts or on exchange, to make a 
total of 663 volumes added. 

Eighty periodical titles are currently being received. Three catalogs : 

Rodin Drawings , Four Centuries of French Drawings , and pie Triunph of Humanism , 
were sent on exchange to 200 participating museiins and libraries . 

Because of lack of staff, the library is open to Moseum staff members only. 


Publications 


During the fiscal year 1978-79, the Publications Department completed two 
major volumes: Art of the Huichol Indians , co-published with Harry N. Abrams, 
Inc. , in New York (November 1978) , and Acts of the Tapestry Symposium (June 
1979). Additionally, the brochure Masterpieces of Fr^ch Art was pi±>lished to 
acconpany the Museums' traveling exhibitim of paintings and drawings (December 
1978) , and two brochures for use by the Development Office were produced ( Ihe 
Corporate Role and Your Investment in the Future of The Fine Arts Museuns of 
San Francisco) . 

Planning and production of the Museums' first published Biennial Report began 
in late 1978, and work on the Apollo magazine issues devoted to The Fine Arts 
Museums of San Francisco, originally scheduled for publication in early 1979 
but postponed for a year, continued to be a major project. 


( 7 ) 


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Along wit±i format planning for the French Paintings and European Paintings 
(expanded from the original Flemish Paintings project) , arrangements for 
publication of a catalog of fans and a theater and dance design catalog 
began taking shape. Finally, first steps were taken toward the development 
of a quarterly publication for The Miseum Society membership. 


Public Programs 

The Department of PL±)lic Programs has increased its education suppc)rt of 
exhibitions, both permanent and tenporary, since last year. Synroosia, 
lectures and an innovative concert program, plus special children's events 
were among the programs offered vdiich were attended by 62,928 people. In 
order to reach the conraunity more effectively and to extend the influence 
of exhibitions, the department has presented concerts and lecture programs 
at ccmnunity sites throughout San Francisco. 


Art School 


The M.H. de Young Memorial liiseum Art School is responsible for conducting 
programs in public education and studio art techniques. It is a nationally 
recognized imseum education program which also serves as a training ground 
for young professionals who wish to pursue careers in museum education. The 
department is staffed by two curators , CETTA personnel and museum interns . 

In the fiscal year 1978-79, the Art School conducted four programs; 1. studio 
art classes at the de Young Itiseum; 2. extension services to schools and com- 
munity centers: the Trip-Out Trucks; 3. The Fine Arts Maseums of San Francisco 
Downtown Center, a branch gallery in the business comnunity, and, 4. the in- 
ternship program. 

1. Art School 


The de Young Museum Art School offers low cost studio art classes to Bay Area 
residents. Classes are designed to relate to the Museums' collection and to 
encourage patronage and understanding of traditional art forms and the art of 
past cultures as well as contenporary art developments. Over one hundred 
classes, special workshops and art-related field trips are offered in four 
quarterly semesters. The school is a non-profit corporation and is sijqjported 
by student fees. Several of the artists are hired through the Mayor's Office 
of Employment and Training. 


Enrollment figures for 1978-79 were: 


Ccranunity and School Groins 


Sumner 1978 (9 weeks) 

1,082 

80 

Fall 1978 (12 weeks) 

910 

49 

Winter 1979 (11 weeks) - 

611 

20 

Spring 1979 (10 weeks) 

591 

35 


( 8 ) 



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Art School Exhibitions : 


A series of exhibitions designed for the cctnbination child/ adult viewer were 
held at the Art School. Special tours and workshops for organized groups 
were held in conjunction with the exhibits. 

Work: Clothes (September - November) , contained over fifty uniforms , hats and 
accessories from many varied occupations . Studio tours : 35 

Space Place (January - February) , included many actual size and large scale 
models frcm NASA and a private collection of many rare toy spaceships and 
robots. Studio tours: 22 

Children's Art From the Collection of Rhoda Kellogg (February - March) , a fore- 
most authority and collector of children's art. Studio tours: 6 

Introductions (April) , introduced works on paper by Anne Doering , Ann Rohney and 
Kay Russell, ti^ee practicing artists on the staff of the Art School. Studio 
tours: 9 

Felt: Forms and Traditions (May) , was held in conjunction with A Weaver's Art 
at the Downtown Center, ^e exhibition included a visual explanation of tech- 
niques involved in feltmaking and work by contemporary feltmkcers . Studio tours : 


McMillan (June - July) , an exhibition of the original drawings created since 1970 
by illustrator Michael McMillan for the de Young Museum Art School/Downtown Center. 
Studio tours: 10 

2 . Trip-Out Trucks 

The Trip-Out Trucks develop an art program in conjunction with the school curricu- 
lum in an effort to integrate art into the daily learning routine of school children. . 
The trucks are cannitted to training teachers as well as working with school-age 
children. Trucks visit child care centers, public schools, senior centers, libraries, 
public hospitals and comnunity centers. Each program involves two planning meetings, 
four studio art sessions and an evaluation meeting (seven visits total to each par- 
ticipant) . This year the program was commsnded by the State Department of Edu- 
cation as an innovative eckicational program and received wide recognition throu^ 

David Rockefeller's Committee on the Arts and the national seminars held in con- 
junction with the publication, Ccming to Our Senses . Two trucks operated four 
days each week visiting 645 conmunity centers in this fiscal year, and had over 
30,000 participants. 


Funding: 


City and County of San Francisco (CETA salaries) 
Museum Society 

National Endowment for the Arts grant 


$32,000 

20,500 

15,300 


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3. Fine Arts Haseums of San Francisco Downtown Center 

The Downtown Center, established in 1976, is a branch gallery of the Museums 
located in the business comiiunity. During the fiscal year 1978-79, the Down- 
town Center 'was staffed by the de Young ILiseum Art School and provided a 
training center for the Rockefeller/National Endowment for the Arts interns. 

The Center provides exhibition and education programs for the business com- 
munity at Three Embarcadero Center, where it relocated in August 1978. Ten 
exhibitions and related programs were offered during this fiscal year which 
had an attendance of over 100,000 people. 

On April 5, 1979, the Board of Trustees voted to discontinue the Downtown 
Center. However, after a great deal of comiiunity interest in retaining the 
Center was esqiressed, the Trustees reconsidered their decision on June 7, 
1979, and voted to keep the Center. At this tine, a split in financial ac- 
countability between the de Young liiseum Art School and the Downtown Center 
was recomnended. Coinnencing with the fiscal year 1979-80, the FAIiSF DTC 
funds will be administered through the FM Foundation. 

4. Intern Training Program 

The museum internship program is funded by the Rockefeller Foundation and 
the National Endowment for the Arts. The curricultm is designed to train 
persons in the field of museum education and to place these persons in po- 
sitions throughout the liiited States. Nine persons were participants in 
the program this year: Israel Alcanter, Michael Milligan, Jose Iferia Bustos, 
Gail Gorton, Susan Rare, Lori Starr, Jess McElroy, Anne Wilson, and Cleveland 
Bellow. 


Docent Council 


The Docents are a select and highly trained groip of men and wcmen who give 
time to conduct tours of the permanent collections of the Asian Art Museum and 
The Fine Arts Museums for the public on a regular and continuing basis. In 
addition, tours of special exhibitions are given by request on special topics, 
to the deaf, to the handicapped, and of course, to school children. Workshops 
are offered for teachers to enable them to conduct a better museum visit with 
their classroom. Programs are carried out in conjunction with the appropriate 
museum Education Department. 

Highlights of the past year include: 

1. Coordination of the visual format of letterhead, roster and bulletin in line 
WTith the museum "look". 

2. Publication of monthly Bulletin of future events. 

3. Joint workshops for all Docents (including Arboretum and California Academy 
of Sciences) on tour techniques for disabled persons. 

4. Comnunity Lecture/Speaker's Bureau for special exhibitions. 

5. Participation in Docent Forum in San Jose. 


( 10 ) 


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6. l-Mntenance of records of Docent activities and individual Docent 
participation . 

7. Continuation of training programs in the Asian Art Moseum and Africa, 
Oceania and the Americas galleries. 

8. Preparation of new trainee program for Western Docents. 

9. Questionnaire sent to all Docents to deteronine effectiveness of Docent 
Council - organization, programs, commLmications , training. 

10. Establishment of peer evaluation for and by Western Docents. 

11. Provision of Western Docents for research projects, for Master’s thesis 
material written by a former Docent, for Curatorial staff. 

12. Participation in Teacher Workshops. 

13 . Continuation of tours of the permanent collections , and special exhibitions 
to the public. 

1,742 general and special tours were given in the Asian Art Museum this year, 
as well as 298 school and in-school tours. 421 general and special tours were 
given in the ADA galleries and 396 school and in-school. In the Western col- 
lections, 731 general, American and special tours took place along with 413 
school tours and 358 hours spent in tours given for the Dresden and Tut exhibi- 
tions. 229 comnunity lecture programs were offered in conjunction with Dresden 
and Tut, serving a total of 26,300 visitors. 

83 tour programs were offered for the visually handicapped, 54 of these being 
associated with the "Tut Tactile" program. Total participants numbered 1,393. 
57 tours were given in both The Fine Arts Miseums and Asian Art: liiseum as part 
of the program for the deaf, general, school and in-school ccmbined. These 
served 1,292 visitors. 

Total active docents as of July 1, 1979 numbered 287. 


Interpretation 

The activities of the Department of Interpretation have expanded greatly this 
year due to our extensive exhibition schedule and the enlargement of our school 
and comnunity outreach programs. Docents continued to be used as guides through- 
out the Mjseums and also visited schools, delivered slide- illustrated ccoinunity 
lectures, and were involved in our programs for the disabled. Labels, wall 
panels, brochures, audio-visual presentaticris , and recorded tours were developed 
to enhance the visitor's imseum experience. Curriculum packets, slide presen- 
tations, and teacher's workshops oriented teachers and students to our special 
exhibitions, and several methods were developed to make our collections and 
ejdiibition programs accessible to the disabled. 


Volunteer Council 


The special exhibitions "Splendor of Dresden" and "Treasures of TutankhamLin' ' 
challenged and motivated The Fine Arts Museums' 600 volunteers in 1979, re- 
sulting in a paraprofessional staff of dedicated and well-trained miseun 
■workers. About 500 volunteers worked about 15,000 hours selling admissicn 


( 11 ) 


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tickets and exhibition catalogs, dispensing information, and working in the 
special gift shop during "Dresden". For the exhibition "Treasures of 
TutankharaLin" , 460 volunteers helped disabled visitors, gave out information, 
monitored school group tours, and answered telephones in the Tut Office, 
working approximately 5,000 hours per month. 

In 1978-79, volunteers provided clerical and research services in museum 
staff offices, worked in the library, repaired tapestries and decorative 
art objects, sold items in the bookshops, and generally filled in as museum 
warkers \dienever needed. Averaging between 3,000 and 5,000 hours per month 
in donated time, volunteers gave as much as $300,000 in labor to The Fine 
Arts Miseums of San Francisco in 1978-79. 


Adminis trat ion 

The activities of the Adminis trat ion Division of the Museums were dominated 
during fiscal year 1978-79 by the administration and planning of major ex- 
hibition budgets as well as the daily operations of a conplex instituticn. 

Along with fiscal management, security and building maintenance, and per- 
sonnel administration, an active development program became a vital function 
of this division. Due to Proposition 13, the Museums' City budget reductico 
of 197o underscored the need to secure alternative long range funding. 

Foundations and federal agencies are two inportant sources on which the Museums 
increasingly rely for support. Grants awarded for this fiscal year included: 

Frcm the National Endowment for the Arts : 

$5,000 for Purchase of Drawings by Living Artists 

$250,000 HVAC: Legion/ de Young 

$13,000 Decorative Arts Projects in de Young 

From Other Sources : 

$5,000 frcm the Institute of Miseim Services for unrestricted operations 
$5,684 frcm the San Francisco Foundation for adaptations to de Young for the blind 
$10,000 from the Hearst Foundation for a feasibility study: reconstructing the 
Spanish Monastery 

$150,000 frcm the Irwin Charity Foundation for HVAC at the Downtown Center and the 
Legion 

$15,000 frcm the Hearst Foundation unrestricted 

During this report period, attendance at the Museums was greatly increased due to 
"Splendor of Dresden" exhibited at the Legion of Honor. Attendance for this ex- 
hibit alone was in excess of 550,000 frcm February to June 1979. Attendance at 
the de Young was estimated at 500,000. 

Major renovation of both Museum buildings took place during this reporting period 
as part of preparations for the two major e^duibits and long term inprovement plans. 
New heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems were installed in order to 
bring the Museums ip to acceptable standards for the safe display of works of art. 


( 12 ) 


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I'liseum Society 


The Museum Society serves as the membership organization for The Fine Arts 
Miiseums of San Francisco and the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco. As of 
June 30, 1979 it had a paid membership of 76,202, and si:pported, in \d-iole or 
in part, a variety of activities at The Fine Arts Museums in 1978-79. 


Activities Quantity 

Exhibitions 8 

Exhibition programs (synposia, films, music and dance) 5 

Exhibition-related Lecture Series and Comnunity Lecture 
programs (Dresden and Tut) 3 

Performing arts programs and series 3 

Lectures 3 

Programs for children 4 

Publications 2 

Ifenibers' events (includes six Dresden members' evenings) 10 

Special events (non-member) 5 

Travel tours 4 

FAt'ESF staff salaries (permanent salaried payroll as of June 
30, 1979) 14 


The Museum Society Auxiliary, a fund-raising arm of The Museum Society, has 
97 Active moiibers and 41 Sustaining members. ILembers of this affiliated group 
assisted at four evening receptions, decorated two Christmas trees in the 
American Galleries at the de Young, and netted $10,864 frcm a benefit lecture 
by Thomas Roving on "The Tomb of Tutarikhamun, a Detective Story". 

The three suburban Auxiliaries in Belvedere-Tiburon , Hillsborough and Ross, 
organized to stimulate interest in the Museum Society and the Museums , each 
held three programs for their menbers during the year. 

Members of the Graphic Arts Council participated in visits to private col- 
lections, lectures, gallery tours, lectures and exhibition previews. A com- 
plete set of William Wiley prints and three other acquisitions were donated by 
the Graphic Arts Council to the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts at the 
Legion of Honor. 

The Museum Society also sponsors the Volunteer Council which trains and organizes 
the over 500 volunteers who staff major exhibitions and assist in many other 
areas of the Miseums. The Bookshops at the de Young and Legion of Honor are 
LLiseum Society projects, as were the special exhibition shops for the Dresden 
and Tutarikhamun ejdiibitions . The Society is also responsible for the catering 
contracts for the Cafe de Young and the Cafe Chanticleer. 

Following is a breakdown of Museum Society expenditures on behalf of The Fine 
Arts Museums in 1978-79. Figures for 1977-78 are included since expenses often 


( 13 ) 


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spanned two fiscal years. 


Exhibitions 

1978-79 

1977-78 

Prints. by Peter Milton 

$ 424 

$ 1,205 

English Silver from the Ibteniyer Collection 

18,366 

8,128 

A Century of Brides 

9,592 

3,146 

The Art of Being Huichol 

50,163 

4,818 

The Splendor of Dresden 

1,507,778 

14,953 

Acquisitions 1978 

5,387 

- 

Masterpieces of French Art (traveling 
exhibition of Legion French paintings) 

57,124 

_ 

Treasures of Tutankhanun 

1,410,747 

98,325 

Education 

Exhibition progranming (symposia, films, 
lectures) 

49,348 


Other programs (lectures, films, 
performing arts) 

14,415 


de Young Museum Art School 

Downtown Center 

15,000 


Trip-out Truck 

15,000 


Scholarship program 

1,875 


Art Apprentice program 

750 


Conminity programs 

7,850 


Gallery Re-installation 

Permanent collections (de Young and Legion) 

10,006 


Adininistration Costs 

FAM Director's Contingency Fund 

45,000 


Indirect costs and equipment 

34,374 


Private receptions /dinners 

63,505 


FAM staff salaries (14 permanent positions) 

233,547 


Publications 

42,075 


Contribution to NEA Challenge Grant 

200,000 



( 14 ) 




I! 








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